4.21.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

The path between birth—a bloody, painful miracle that gives us breath—and death, another draconian miraculous bloodbath that closes our eyes forever, may be no more a matter of will than the atomic results of fused hydrogen that yield the stuff that makes us, yet an affirmation of human inclination and desire are arguably essential attributes of anything other than shrugs and sighs in response to life’s exigencies.

Quote of the Day
“What kept me sane was knowing that things would change, and it was a question of keeping myself together until they did…. “You can’t help it. An artist’s duty, as far as I’m concerned, is to reflect the times.”  Nina Simone
This Day in History
Giovanni Paolo Panini (Italian, Piacenza 1691–1765 Rome) - Ancient Rome
Giovanni Paolo Panini (Italian, Piacenza 1691–1765 Rome) – Ancient Rome

Today is the birthday of Rome, and, on the other side of our globe, it is Vietnam Book Day; near the Tiber river in the Italian Peninsula, two thousand seven hundred and sixty eight years prior to today, Romulus founded the City of Rome; one thousand one hundred and fifteen years ago, in what is now known as the Phillippines, the earliest known written document from that area known as the Laguna Copperplate Inscription was created, which records the Commander-in-Chief of the Kingdom of Tondo, as represented by the Honourable Jayadewa, Lord Minister of Pailah, pardoning from all debt the Honourable Namwaran and his relations; eight hundred and seventy three years previously, the French philosopher and theologian Peter Abelard drew his last breath; five hundred and nine years prior to the present pass, the three-day Lisbon Massacre, which massacred almost 2000 suspected Jews, came to a bloody end; three hundred and sixteen years ago, Jean Racine, famous French playwright, met his final reward; two hundred and thirty three years before today, King Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke foundedthe city now known as Bangkok; ten years later, in 1792, a revolutionary Brazilian leader was hanged, drawn, and quartered; twenty four years later, in 1816, the baby who would grow up to be Charlotte Brontë, English author and

pens Keith Williamson Flickr
pens Keith Williamson Flickr

poet, drew her first breath; one hundred and seventy nine years ago, Sam Houston’s forces defeated Mexican troops in the Battle of San Jacinto; two years after that, in 1838the infant who would become John Muir, Scottish-American environmentalist and author uttered his first cry; eighteen years subsequently, in 1856, Stonemasons and building workers on building sites around Melbourne marched from the University of Melbourne to Parliament House so as to win an 8 hour day in the Australian Labour Movement; eight years after, in 1864,  Max Weber, German economist and sociologist, was born; one hundred and seventeen years prior to today, The U.S. Navy blocked Cuban ports during the Spanish American war; one hundred and five years prior, Mark Twain, American author and creator of Huckleberry Finn, perished; one hundred and three years ago, in 1912, Marcel Camus, French director and screenwriter, was born; one hundred and one years prior to the present pass, a German arms shipment to Mexico is intercepted by the U.S. Navy near Veracruz, Veracruz, in the Ypiranga Incident; only eleven years after that point, in 1925, the Manifesto of the Fascist Intellectuals was published in Il Mondo, establishing the political and ideological foundations of Italian Fascism; eight years later, in 1932, Elaine May, American actress, director, and screenwriter, came to this world; and seven years after that, in 1939, Sister Helen Prejean, American author and activist, was born; sixty eight years prior to the present pass, the

By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons
By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons

influential economist John Maynard Keynes drew his last breath; two years later, in 1948, Aldo Leopold, American ecologist and author spent his last day on earth; sixty years ago, Secretary’s Day, which is now Administrative Professionals’ Day, was first celebrated; eight years afterwards, in 1960, Brasilia, Brazil’s capital city, was first inaugurated; two years later, in 1962, the Seattle World’s Fair, also known as Century 21 exposition, opens; one year after that, in 1963, a Transit-5bn satellite failed to reach orbit after launch; as it re-entered the atmosphere, 2.1 pounds (0.95 kg) of radioactive plutonium in its SNAP RTG power source was widely dispersed; forty eight years prior to today, anticipating by a few days the general election in Greece, Colonel George Papadopoulos lead a coup d’état, establishing a military regime that lasted for seven years; forty years ago, in the climactic end of the Vietnam War, President of South Vietnam Nguyen Van Thieu fled Saigon, as Xuan Loc, the last South Vietnamese outpost blocking a direct North Vietnamese assault on Saigon, fell; twenty six years before the present moment, the Tiananmen Square Protests begin in Beijing, when approximately 100,000 students gathered in Tiananmen Square to commemorate Chinese reform leader Hu Yaobang; three

"Lspn comet halley" by NASA/W. Liller - NSSDC's Photo Gallery (NASA)
“Lspn comet halley” by NASA/W. Liller – NSSDC’s Photo Gallery (NASA)

years afterwards, in 1992, the first discoveries of extrasolar planets was announced by astronomers Alexander Wolszczan and Dale Frail. They discovered two planets orbiting the pulsar PSR 1257+12; one years later, in 1993, the Supreme Court in La Paz, Bolivia, sentenced former dictator Luis Garcia Meza to 30 years in jail without parole for murder, theft, fraud and violating the constitution; twelve years prior to today, jazz singer and activist Nina Simone met her end; and five years ago, the controversial Kharkiv Pact (Russian Ukrainian Naval Base for Gas Treaty) was signed in Kharkiv, Ukraine, by Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych and Russian President Dimitry Medvedev; it would be unilaterally terminated by Russia on March 31, 2014. From Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
racism definition analysis critique OR debunk OR refutation OR rebut OR disprove rationale OR purpose OR explanation history OR origins

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TOP OF THE FOLD

MONOPOLY MEDIA TROLL FLOTILLAS

http://sputniknews.com/columnists/20150420/1021135202.html         An incisive indictment from Sputnik News of the hypocrisy, propagated imperial propaganda, and generally fatuous superficiality and distortion that typify standard outputs of corporate news, culture, and information in the so-called ‘West,’ where ‘free’ markets are all fixed and groupthink reigns supreme: “The multi-billion-dollar Western news media networks are replete with an unquestioning, unwavering anti-Russian agenda.  This agenda is recklessly inflaming international tensions to the point of inciting further conflict and even an all-out global war. …In unison, (corporate outlets) are functioning as a global ministry of propaganda.
Reputable Russian news media have not indulged in the unquestioning Western narrative asserting that Russian aggression is the cause of the entire Ukrainian conflict.  In other words, the Russian news industry is providing proper journalistic services.
Russian media do not talk blindly about Russia’s ‘annexation of Crimea.’  Russian media have refused to toe the Western media line that, against voluminous evidence, denies the Neo-Nazi character of the Western-backed Kiev regime.
Therefore, the Western reasoning goes, the Russian media are a Kremlin propaganda tool and Moscow has despatched a ‘Troll Army’ to disseminate disinformation.  How richly ironic is that?”
JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

PRESS 53 AwARD FOR POETRY 
This contest is open to any writer, regardless of his or her publication history, provided the manuscript is written in English and the author lives in the United States. The winner of this contest will receive publication by Press 53, a $1,000 cash advance, travel expenses and lodging for a special reading and book signing party in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and ten copies of the book; all prizes will be awarded upon publication. Deadline July 31, 2015.

CRAB CREEK REVIEW POETRY PRIZE 
$16 ENTRY FEE.
Deadline May 15, 2015. $500 prize for the winning poem. The winner and finalists will be published in the following volume of Crab Creek Review, and all entries will be considered for publication. Welcomes up to four poems per entry, eight pages maximum.

ST LOUIS REGIONAL ARTS COMMISSION ARTISTS SUPPORT GRANTS 
Deadline April 23. $500 to $3,000 awards. These funds can be designated for (but not limited to) equipment and materials, rental space, arts-related travel, conference fees, project completion, salaries, professional and artistic development, training, and other resources for individual artists of all disciplines. Open to artists living in St. Louis City or St. Louis County for at least one year with documentation.

 EDWIN WAY TEALE ARTISTS-IN-RESIDENCE AT TRAIL WOOD PROGRAM 
Connecticut Audubon Society is now accepting applications for the 2015 Edwin Way Teale Artists-in-Residence at Trail Wood program. Connecticut Audubon invites writers and visual artists, chosen through a juried process, to spend one week in residence at the former home of Pulitzer Prize-winning naturalist writer and photographer Edwin Way Teale. After the completion of the residency, participating writers and visual artists are invited to attend a follow-up event, Trail Wood’s Under the Harvest Moon festival, held annually on-site in September.

ROOTS RATED 
Specifically seeking freelance writers to create articles about outdoor recreation in and around Hilton Head, but we publish detailed profiles of trails, parks, nature preserves and wilderness areas. RootsRated is a media platform that connects users with the best outdoor experiences, hand-picked by local outdoor retailers and their networks of local experts. We are NOT another website full of crowd-sourced trail reviews. We harness the collective expertise of high-level local runners, skiers, riders, paddlers, and climbers. Then we share it through exclusive stories and destination reviews — curated city by city — about the best trails, runs, routes, crags, and more. RootsRated brings people who love the outdoors together, through insights from locals who are most in the know. Some samples follow.

http://rootsrated.com/chicago-il/trail-running/deer-grove-forest—trail-running
http://rootsrated.com/chicago-il/mountain-biking/kettle-moraine-state-forest—southern-unit—mountain-biking

We also offer weekly feature article assignments that pay $125. Pays $70 for destination profiles. Prefers to work with freelances on multiple assignments rather than one and done.

FAMILY TREE MAGAZINE
Family Tree Magazine is a special-interest consumer magazine that helps readers discover, preserve and celebrate their family’s history. We cover genealogy, ethnic heritage, personal history, genealogy websites and software, photography and photo preservation, and other ways that families connect with their past. Pays up to $800 depending on length and experience. Pays 25 percent kill fee.
today’s listing thanks to Funds For Writers
pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Reporters Without Borders – The Advocacy and Communications Officer will implement, develop and promote the advocacy strategies and campaigns of Reporters Without Borders in the United States, under the supervision of the US Director.  Reporters Without Borders USA (a 501c3 non-profit organization) is the U.S. office of the global organization Reporters sans frontières (RSF), based in Paris, a world leading defender of freedom of information with 30 years of experience.

Job Opening: Managing Editor Tikkun Daily

Do you believe journalism has a crucial role to play in healing and transforming the world? Are you a skilled editor who can move effortlessly from reshaping a news story on the struggle for a living wage to editing a scholarly essay on feminist theology? Tikkun magazine is looking for a full-time managing editor to produce its award-winning print magazine and manage its lively online content.

Gannett Co. Inc. : News and Sports Reporter (Coshocton-OH) – 04/08/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9019

– The Seattle Times : Investigative Reporter (Seattle-WA) – 04/09/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9024

 

Expert Home Improvement Writer Needed (Maine)

Major home improvement company is looking for a talented, detailed-oriented writer with expert knowledge in both home repair and installation. We are looking for a writer to build a long-term relationship with and offer competitive rates, schedule flexibility, as well as a number of opportunities to enhance your online reputation. Compensation: Rates based on experience.

 

Cannabis Reviews & Culture Writing (Greater Seattle)

We’re a pouplar cannabis new and knowledge website looking to do more pieces on culture and product reviews specific to Seattle. 
For product reviews we will compensate for the cost of the products. Compensation: Per Post Based on Experience / Rate

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

Bob Jagendorf
Bob Jagendorf

War on Drugs Claims Next Victim

A Truth-Out opinion piece that contextualizes a recent police abuse case that had much to do with the bigoted War on Drugs: “To make matters worse, Baltimore police officials admitted today that the reasons for Gray’s arrest are still “vague,” and that cops probably just thought that he was “immediately involved or had been recently involved in criminal activity.”

In other words, Freddie Gray was probably just guilty of being Black in a neighborhood known for its drug problems.

Thanks to Nixon and Reagan’s war on drugs, this is the reality that millions of people of color live with everyday all across the US.

They live in fear of law enforcement because law enforcement, instead of trying to protect them, acts like an occupying force.”

 

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Posthumous Prize Scorned

A Guardian article that discusses fellow Nigerian author’s scorn and contempt for a posthumous prize for his recently deceased compatriot: “”Let us quit this indecent exercise of fatuous plaints, including raising hopes, even now, with talk of ‘posthumous’ conferment, when you know damned well that the Nobel committee does not indulge in such tradition. It has gone beyond ‘sickening’. It is obscene and irreverent. It desecrates memory,” Soyinka told Sahara Reporters. “This conduct is gross disservice to Chinua Achebe and disrespectful of the life-engrossing occupation known as literature. How did creative valuation descend to such banality? Do these people know what they’re doing – they are inscribing Chinua’s epitaph in the negative mode of thwarted expectations. I find that disgusting.””

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

 

"Internet1" by Rock1997 - Own work
“Internet1” by Rock1997 – Own work

Local Governments Shaping Wikipedia

A Route Fifty article that discusses an important role that governments could have in making Wikipedia more useful for local governments, and thus increase and improve the updating of information: “For Wikipedia to maintain its current standards—let alone improve—new contributors and new types of participation are needed. In recent years, Wikipedia has built partnerships with museums, libraries and similar institutions, including at the federal level.

So far, local governments have not played a big role in this. But there is good reason to think they can.

From the local government perspective, the argument for participation is simple: constituents are already there, agencies have information to share, and Wikipedia’s stated mission to provide “free access to the sum of all human knowledge” creates possibilities for collaboration. If your organization has something to offer—and is up to the challenge—here are some steps toward getting involved.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

Dismantling Nuclear Wreck

A Japan Times article that discusses the research and development effort being undertaken to undo the damage caused by the wrecked nuclear reactor in Japan: “In a ceremony Monday, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency marked the opening of a research center in Ibaraki Prefecture to promote the decommissioning process for the heavily damaged Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

At the ceremony for the state-funded Collaborative Laboratories for Advanced Decommissioning Science, science minister Hakubun Shimomura described the center’s mission.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Loan Difficulties Target Minorities

A Hechinger Report article on the consequences of loan diminutions on minority college-bound populations: “Historically black colleges and universities, where black students make up more than 80 percent of the student body, were particularly hard hit. The number of recipients of federal parent loans fell 46 percent, compared to a 29 percent drop at other colleges that educate students from low-income families*. The steep fall in college loans coincided with a 3.4 percent drop in the number of students enrolled at historically black schools, a loss of almost 100 students per institution on average.”

4.20.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

IMG_0159The institutional gargantuans that rule the current context, inasmuch as such behemoths control practically speaking all the lucre and most of the militarized might that the world now contains, may seem insuperable, yet just as little David overcame mighty Goliath, so too regular citizens—if they can figure out how to unite, in any case—can conquer any counterforce that plutocracy and tyranny put forth.

Quote of the Day
When you stop learning, stop listening, stop looking and asking questions, always new questions, then it is time to die…  Segregation is evil; there is no pattern of life which can dehumanize men as can the way of segregation… for segregation is spiritual lynching.”
Lillian Smith
This Day in History
"Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing" por W. Müller
“Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing” por W. Müller

Today is 4/20 Day, an international celebration of Cannabis culture; in Rome, seven hundred and twelve years ago, Pope Boniface VIII instituted the Sapienza University; five hundred and sixty two years in the past, the last naval battle in Byzantine history occurs, as three Genoese galleys escorting a Byzantine transport fought their way through the huge Ottoman blockade fleet and into the Golden Horn; five hundred and twenty one years previous to the present moment, Johannes Agricola, German theologian and reformer, drew his first breath; four hundred eighty one years prior to the present pass, the explorer and mariner Jacques Cartier begun the voyage during which he first ran into the territory that later European settlers denominated Canada and Labrador; one hundred and nineteen years later, in 1653, revolutionary protestant leader Oliver Cromwell dissolved the parliamentary body that allowed for the execution of King Charles I; four years subsequently, in 1657, the then-city of New Amsterdam granted freedom of religion to its Jewish residents; two hundred and twenty three years back, France declared war against the King of Hungary and Bohemia, an act that brought about the French Revolutionary Wars; two hundred and five years prior to this moment, the governor of Caracas declared independence from Spain, thus shoving off the Imperial yoke; one hundred and eighty seven years ago, Rene Caillie became the first non-Muslim to enter the West African city of

"Caillie 1830 Timbuktu view" by René Caillié (1799-1838) - Caillié, René (1830), Journal d'un voyage à Temboctou et à Jenné, dans l'Afrique Centrale
“Caillie 1830 Timbuktu view” by René Caillié (1799-1838) – Caillié, René (1830), Journal d’un voyage à Temboctou et à Jenné, dans l’Afrique Centrale

Timbuktu; one hundred and fifty three before the here and now, scientists Louis Pasteur and Claude Bernard completed the experiment that falsified the theory of spontaneous generation; nine years afterwards, in 1871, the Civil Rights act became law; one hundred and twenty two years ago, the baby who would soon grow up to be the legendary surrealist painter Joan Miro drew his first breath; one hundred and thirteen years prior to the present pass, the scientists Pierre and Marie Curie refined radium chloride; ten years later, in 1912, the Irish author Bram Stoker breathed his last; two years after that, in 1914, a Colorado workers’ strike lead to a tragic encounter with predatory capitalists’ armies, leading to the Ludlow Massacre; seventy six years prior to the current moment, the legendary blues singer Billie Holiday recorded Strange Fruit, what would turn out to be the first Civil Rights song; seventy years ahead of the present moment, the baby who would grow up to be Alistair Cooke, Baron Lexden, noteworthy English historian and author, uttered his first cry; sixty nine years before the here and now, the League of Nations officially dissolved, ceding most of its power to the United Flag_of_the_League_of_Nations_(1939–1941).svgNations; sixty four years before today, the baby who grew up to beLuther Vandross, American singer, songwriter and producer, was born; ten years later, the disastrously embarrassing and fascistic imperial Bay of Pigs invasion took place; thirty three years prior to the present pass, Archibald MacLeish, American poet, passed on to his greater reward; eleven years later, Cantinflas, Mexican actor, producer, and screenwriter, died; sixteen years ago, one of the many SSRI murder sprees took place in Columbine, CO, when Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed 13 people and injured 21 others; five years previous to today, the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, an environmental catastrophe that killed eleven workers and begun an oil spill that would last six monthsFrom Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"identity politics" fetish OR diversion OR deflect OR deflection OR "divide and conquer" = 76,300 Citations.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

A THOROUGH DEBUNKING OF ‘JUST-SAY-NO-TO-DRUGS’

https://www.contributoria.com    For readers willing to spend some time reading, an extensive analysis, replete with massive evidence and evident insight, of ‘drug culture,’ drug wars, and the political economy of contraband, “From Heroin to Ritalin”: “We live with the split personality that these lyrics from (“Prohibition Blues”) illustrate.  This affects us spiritually.  It colours our ethics and whatever sense of integrity that people have.  It means that, psychologically, we are both as often as not living against our better selves, and unable to avoid states of deeply experienced, almost insufferable, anxiety and stress and panic—not for nothing is ours ‘the age of terror.’
In no other realm than in relation on the one hand to contraband and on the other hand to so-called ‘medications’ do these tendencies more profoundly express themselves in the contemporary arena.  We live with these contradictions and little hypocrisies about ‘substances’ almost every second that we breathe.
Reports and analyses from sources as diverse as Interpol and the United Nations, on the official side, and private think tanks like the Soros Justice Initiative and the Drug Policy Alliance, on the Non-Governmental Organisation side, detail and document such complicated skeins.  Often enough, scholars who have served to advance agendas of ‘fighting narcotics’ or ‘developing treatments’ have opened their hearts and their files to reveal the venality and profiteering at the root of such duplicitous policing battles and pseudo-scientific ‘healthy-living’ campaigns.
These and many other decidedly suboptimal effects—combining repression and malfeasance—of what lying thugs call ‘The War on Drugs’ or that self-serving ‘authorities’ label diagnostic and therapeutic intervention are not the heart of our problems, however.  This core conflict appears as a three-part dynamic that rules the present moment, an overarching ubiquity that confronts us with a choice either to accept it and live in misery or to face and deal with it and transform the world.”
JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

WE NEED DIVERSE BOOKS SHORT STORY CONTEST 
Open to emerging diverse writers from all diverse backgrounds  who have not been published in a traditional print fiction book format, including self-published, independents, small and medium publishing houses, in all genres whether for the children’s or adult market. The winner receives US$1,000 and publication in the “Stories For All Of Us” anthology. Deadline May 8, 2015.

MIDDLE SHELF MAGAZINE’S COMPETITION FOR BEST INDIE CHILDREN & YOUNG ADULT BOOKS
$40 ENTRY FEE. Any independently published book for children or teens in any genre is eligible. The overall winners in each category (children, middle grade, young adult) will each receive $500 and a year’s worth of full-page ads in Middle Shelf Magazine (rate card value $4,500). In addition, more than 100 books deemed by the editors as “notable” entries will be featured in the November/December issue of Middle Shelf Magazine. “Independently Published” books include self-published books and e-books, and/or books and e-books published through small presses releasing less than five titles per year. The competition is open to authors worldwide; books must be in English. Any length book and any publication date is eligible.
Deadline August 1, 2015. The winners will be notified by September 4, 2015.

thanks to Funds for Writers for previous listings

Buzzfeed – Aspiring writers who want to build a successful writing career are encouraged to apply for BuzzFeed.com’s Emerging Writers Fellowship. Along with ongoing mentorship and editorial support, each fellow receives a $12,000 stipend for financial support.Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission
Commonwealth Short Story Prize Prize
is an annual award for unpublished short fiction open to citizens of the 53 Commonwealth countries. The prize covers the five Commonwealth regions: Africa, Asia, Canada and Europe, Caribbean and Pacific. One winner will be selected from each region, with one regional winner to be selected as the overall winner. The overall winner of the Commonwealth Short Story Prize will receive £5000 (US$8200) and the remaining four regional winners receive £2500. Entries for the 2016 Commonwealth Short Story Prize are expected to open in October 2015.

 

Ploughshares Emerging Writer’s Contest
is open to writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry who have yet to publish a book. Fiction entries must be under 6000 words. The winner in each genre will be awarded US$1000 and publication. Entries close 15 May.

Tupelo Press: Berkshire Prize for a First or Second Book of Poetry  Deadline: April 30. The Berkshire Prize for a First or Second Book of Poetry includes a cash award of $3,000 in addition to publication by Tupelo Press, 20 copies of the winning title, a book launch, and national distribution with energetic publicity and promotion. We suggest submitting a manuscript of 48 to 88 pages of poems, but all manuscripts will be read and considered with full respect, regardless of length.

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Seeking Experienced Wine, Yoga, Astronomy, and Astrology Writers Are you a published writer with experience writing about one of the subjects mentioned above? Callisto Media is a startup publishing company of best-selling non-fiction.

The details:
• We provide meticulous book outlines and project requirements
• A typical project takes 60-100 hours (30,000-40,000 words) to complete and pays $3,000-$4,000
• Writers who work successfully on our titles have the opportunity to complete multiple projects each year

 

Atlanta magazine is looking for a writer, whose role will consist primarily of enhancing the daily news coverage at atlantamagazine.com. The ideal candidate will be a news junkie with insatiable curiosity and deep knowledge about one of the most fascinating metro areas in America. Areas of expected coverage will include, but aren’t limited to, politics, growth, transit, and the changing demographics of an increasingly international city.

 

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology COPYWRITER / CONTENT MARKETING SPECIALIST

We are currently seeking a Copywriter / Content Marketing Specialist to be responsible for the written representation of the ETD (Economic & Technology Development) department’s mission and brand, primarily through the development of branded messages and communications materials. They will also responsible for researching, writing and editing articles and publications and translating scientific and technical ideas in simple language for a general audience.

 

 

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS WRITER  Strategize and write original highly distinctive and competitive content for a range of communications materials, including web content, brochures, ads, tradeshow displays, scripts, etc. to support branding and growth objectives across CACI markets with specific focus in the healthcare market area of a solutions and services IT company serving the U.S. federal government. Recommends overall organization, editorial standards, quality control, continuity of message, and publication methods.

Editorial Development Associates Editorial Development Associates seeks an experienced writer/editor for the Pflaum Gospel Weeklies, a Catholic K-8 religion curriculum, published by Pflaum Publishing Group, a division of Bayard Inc. Writer/Editor is responsible to develop, create, write, copy, edit, and proof age-appropriate stories, features, activities, prayer services, reader-response features, and teaching guides. Option of part time hours can be considered

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

Jon Sullivan - public domain
Jon Sullivan – public domain

Charitable Works of Famous Writer

An Inside Philanthropy inside look at the philanthropic work of a well-respected popular writer who has populist leanings and Southern background: “Many of Grishman’s novels have populist themes, hinting at the author’s liberal worldview. All have sold well. Grisham’s net worth has been estimated at upwards of $200 million and Grisham and his wife Renee have a rather long history of giving money away.

The Grishams channel much of their philanthropy through the Oakwood Foundation Charitable Trust, which has given away between $2 and $4 million annually in recent years. The couple’s philanthropy mainly focuses on Mississippi and Virginia, two states where they have residences. But money goes further away, too. Here are a few things to know about Grisham philanthropy.”

Child Shooting Sparks Outrage

A World Socialist Web Site report that discusses a protest spurred by brutal military attacks, and showing the ways that people power is increasing:  “The latest killings triggered a series of angry protests, which were first met with renewed police violence, including the use of stun grenades and pepper spray against protesters, several of whom were beaten and arrested. Protesters retaliated with rocks and bottles.

Images of the body of the 10-year-old child sprawled in a pool of blood at his family’s doorstep triggered widespread outrage, sparking protests in other nearby favelas and a march for “peace” in the wealthier beachside neighborhood of Copacabana.”

 

Desk - Bright Meadow Flickr
Desk – Bright Meadow Flickr

 Hispanic Organization Media Conference

A link to an event that gathers media makers from Hispanic backgrounds: “Two weeks ago, Happiness Engineers Karen Arnold, Marjorie R. Asturias, and Jamil Abreu, as well as Code Wrangler Damian Suarez, attended the sixth annual Hispanicize conference in downtown Miami, Florida. The event, which took place from March 16-20, is billed as the “largest annual event for Latino trendsetters and newsmakers in journalism, blogging, marketing, entertainment, and tech entrepreneurship,” drawing over 2,000 attendees. Marjorie shares her experience meeting and getting to know some of the most influential bloggers in the Latino community. “

Teaching Grant Writing

A Library of Congress announcement of new grant opportunities for those interested in media and education: “Today, the Library of Congress announced the availability of $950,000 to support the development of engaging web- and mobile-based applications, for classroom use, on Congress and civic participation.

The Library seeks to identify one or more educational partners who can help the Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) program develop online interactives and mobile apps on Congress and civic participation, designed for use in K-12 education. The selected partners will be expected to use and incorporate not only the Library’s online primary sources, but also the many other resources available online from the Library of Congress”

guitar music art performanceStory of Protest and Oppression

A TeleSur article that discusses the tragic life of a protest song legend from the 70s who documented an acute moment of hope alongside a terrible moment of dissappointment in South America: “One of the greatest protest musicians in American history took his life exactly 39 years ago. Driven into a deep depression by both his own demons and the demoralization that faced radical leftists in the mid-70’s, Phil Ochs in many ways died with the movement. This week, I wanted to write about a lesser-known story from Phil’s life, and of his run-ins with another significant part of the history of that time period.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

NYTNon Profit News

A Columbia Journalism Review article that discusses prognoses for non profit news outlets: “If the report were a weather forecast, the prediction for nonprofits would be partly cloudy with a chance of sun. Most of the 20 news organizations it examines aren’t sustainable yet, though a few are, and Knight argues that a handful of others are on their way.

But beyond that optimistic framing, the details of the report point to continuing problems. Of the 14 nonprofits included in both this report and the last one, published in 2013, only three have been able to grow, while four have cut staff, and the other seven have held steady. Web traffic gains have been modest, once we account for traffic inflation across the internet. And finding a revenue model to keep the lights on remains a daunting challenge.”

Media Fact Checking Growth Industry

A Poynter posting that discusses some opportunities for academics and scrappy writers in a field of journalism that is actually thriving: “As some wring their hands about a decline in newsroom resources and quality, there’s a “huge growth” in fact checking in the coverage of politics, according to a new academic study.

Several thousand papers were delivered at the Midwest Political Science Association conference, including, “Where and Why Do Journalists Fact-Check.” The paper contends that reporters now fact-check politicians more than ever. One co-author describes it as an “explosion” that coincides with an obvious growth in the coverage of national politics.

“Every single elite organization engages in visible fact checking of politics,” Lucas Graves of the University of Wisconsin told a small audience on Thursday as he sketched the study’s preliminary findings.”

 

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

smartphone twitter social mediaTwitter for News Campaigns

A Nuclear Free California posting that describes the ins and outs of utilizing twitter as a powerful tool for activists: “One of the most valuable tactical tools for Twitter is during public events when the media is covering the issue.  The Nuclear Industry has long been prepped at using the twitter feed to promote its side of the issue during these events and can be counted on to show up.  By collecting the best stories and content and feeding them rapidly onto the feed during the event, you can counter the industry’s spin and influence reporters that will more than likely be watching the live twitter feed.  A good place to collect hot tweets you want to use for such an event is with the “Favorite” option that will allow you to quickly find yours or other folks best posts.  Being at the event makes it a bit tricky to do, but if you have a live video stream of the event, then you can monitor tweets and the events.  A best practices strategy for this is to prepare well in advance and contact your techies for content they may think is appropriate. “

RECENT HAPPENINGS

Kenya Massacre U.S. Connection

An international politics blog post that discusses the possible ramifications of U.S. imperialist actions in Africa: “The systematic murder of 147 Kenyan university students by members of the Somalia-based Shabab organization on April 2 is raising an uncomfortable question: was the massacre an unintentional blowback from U.S. anti-terrorism strategy in the region? And were the killers forged by an ill-advised American supported Ethiopian invasion that transformed the radical Islamic organization from a marginal player into a major force?”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

 

"DreamyWeed" by Psychonaught
“DreamyWeed” by Psychonaught

A New Weed Seller on the Horizon

A Rolling Stone article that discusses a famous rock star’s foray into the world of selling weed: “Rolling Stone recently caught up with Nelson on his bus backstage near San Antonio, Texas, where he discussed the product. “I will make sure it’s good or it won’t be on sale,” the singer says. “There should be a menu just like in a restaurant because there’s so many different kinds of pot that do many different things. It’s a good idea to have everything labeled for what it does, what it don’t do [and] how powerful it is.””

4.17.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

 

hector gomez
hector gomez

A casual use of terminology—describing political sensibility in terms of ‘left’ and ‘right;’ speaking of “middle class” as an actual descriptive category; arguing about the effects of “race” as if some such analytical descriptor really applied to humans—certainly makes conversation easier, since neither do participants have any responsibility for their arguments, which are inherently devoid of meaning, nor do disputants have much more to disagree about than that they “believe” one thing or another at variance with some ultimately trivial notion that somebody else “believes:” however, such superficial and easygoing attitudes toward language and content also guarantee that all of our discourses will add up to zero, or maybe in the end slightly less, inasmuch as we will often enough surmise that we’ve talked about something of substance when, manifestly, that is not the case.

Quote of the Day
“Fiction has helped my journalism because it has given it literary value.   Journalism has helped my fiction because it has kept me in a close relationship with reality. …In journalism just one fact that is false prejudices the entire work.  In contrast, in fiction one single fact that is true gives legitimacy to the entire work.  That’s the only difference, and it lies in the commitment of the writer.  A novelist can do anything he wants so long as he makes people believe in it.”  Gabriel Garcia Marquez; “The Art of Fiction:” 
This Day in History

Today is World Hemophilia Day, and, in Syria, Evacuation Day, celebrating the end of French Rule from across the Mediterranean; in Persia six hundred sixty-six years ago, the almost seven century reign of the Bavand Dynasty in what is at this point contemporary Iran came to a close; just two years less than

Chaucer ellesmere
Chaucer ellesmere

half a century later, in 1397, England’s bard Geoffrey Chaucer performed The Canterbury Tales for the first time at the King’s court, supposedly exactly a decade following his original departure on a pilgrimage to the archbishopric there; half a decade shy of a century hence, in 1492, Italian navigator Christopher Columbus and Spain’s rulers signed the agreement that would govern his trip to the ‘Indies’ in search of ‘spices;’ four hundred ninety-one years before this exact moment in time, Martin Luther went on trial for his teachings before the Diet of Worms, which process, though it frightened him, led to his ultimate break with the Catholic Church; three years subsequently, in 1524, the Florentine seaman Giovanni da Verrazzano, in the employ of France’s king, reached the central part of North America from Europe, at New York Harbor, for the first time since the Norse crossings many centuries passed; four hundred twenty-nine years before today’s passage, a baby English boy was born who would mature as prominent writer and playwright, John Ford; a hundred nine years thereafter, Southeast across the Atlantic in 1695 Mexico, the genius nun, poet, and thinker Juana Inez de la Cruz died from a plague infection that likely resulted form her ministering to other victims; two and a quarter centuries 468px-Benjamin-Franklin-U.S.-$100-billback, Benjamin Franklin’s long and productive life came to an end; seven years after that juncture, in 1797, in the Caribbean, the British general Ralph Abercromby led ten thousand soldiers, including German mercenaries, in an opportunistic attempt to dislodge the Spanish from Puerto Rico, an effort which failed, and, across the Atlantic in Verona, Italy, ‘leading’ citizens started an uprising against France’s revolutionary occupation there that also did not succeed; one hundred fifty-four years prior to the present pass, Virginia’s legislature voted to become the eighth former U.S. State to join the Confederacy; twelve decades before the here and now, Japanese victors in the First Sino-Japanese War forced a treaty on China that ceded the Korean Peninsula, parts of Taiwan, and other islands to Japan’s hegemonistic expansion in the region; seven hundred and thirty-one days later, in 1897, an American baby boy uttered his first cry on his way to a life as writer and gadfly Thornton Wilder; eight years precisely beyond that point, the U.S. Supreme Court vitiated human rights and democracy and decided in Lochner v. New York that any legislation that interfered with property’s contractual plunder of workers or others was a violation of sacrosanct ‘liberties;’ two years beyond that juncture, in 1907, the Ellis Island immigration-processing facility in New York City had its

"USA-NYC-Statue of Liberty" by Ingfbruno - Own work
“USA-NYC-Statue of Liberty” by Ingfbruno – Own work

busiest one-day through-flow, of nearly twelve thousand newly arrived residents; half a decade hence, six thousand miles away in Siberia in 1912, Russian troops shot down a hundred fifty or more protesting miners, an incident that helped to cause the sort of outflow that led to Ellis Island’s through-flow; eighty-seven years ago, a baby girl from a different Russian diaspora was born in New York who would mature as the storied crafter of prose, Cynthia Ozick; sixty-nine years before this moment in time, modern Syria first gained its independence from French ‘protection’ and colonial predation; three years after that conjunction, a couple thousand miles North in 1949, Ireland formally sundered all but its Northern Irish portion from the United Kingdom; a dozen years henceforth, and four thousand miles Southwest in 1961, Central Intelligence Agency trained, financed, and directed terrorists invaded Cuba at the Bay of Pigs in an operation as inglorious as it was unsuccessful; six years yet more proximate to the present, in 1967, a girl child took her first breath on her way to a life as feminist, radical, popular crooner and rocker, Liz Phair; on the opposite side of the globefour years later, in 1971, the nation of Bangladesh first came into existence as a formally separate entity from Pakistan; around the world again two years to the day after that juncture, in 1973, George Lucas began composing his film treatment for what would become the StarWars franchise; just three hundred sixty-five days back, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Kepler program first discovered a planetary body of roughly Earth’s size more or less a similar distance from its guiding star, and the conscious spirit of Gabriel Garcia Marquez exited his dying frame bound for who knows where. From Wikipedia Day in History

book hor2

SEARCH OF THE DAY
journalism propaganda "monopoly media" OR "establishment media" OR "mainstream media" OR presstitute OR "corporate media" facts context OR history complexity depth lack OR missing OR ignorant OR ignorance"political economy" = 91,600 Hits.

book hor

TOP OF THE FOLD

HONEST ISRAELI H-BOMB BACKGROUND

http://www.i24news.tv    An Israeli media outlet’s overview of the initiation of Israel’s nuclear weapons development, a fact about which the Jewish State still maintains an attitude of ‘plausible deniability,’ a complex, decades-long process in which multiple nations played a part, which clearly reveals the hypocrisy of railing against Iranian ‘nuclear plans(),’ and about which the U.S. has recently released copious formerly classified documents: “‘[Prime Minister David] Ben-Gurion believed in nuclear energy,’ Peres said.  ‘At first we tried to get a nuclear reactor from America.  In America they told us, ‘without supervision, we have nothing to talk about.’  President Eisenhower had an aid plan to use the nuclear reactor to create isotopes for medical purposes.  Those who participated in the plan got $500,000 and a small reactor that was capable of producing several grams of enriched uranium.’

         Israel accepted the offer, Peres recalled: ‘We decided to take it and we built it in Nahal Sorek. But since we were against supervision, we build the additional reactor in Dimona at the same time –we did that with the French.’

Peres was summoned then by President John Kennedy, who suspected the Dimona reactor was being built despite lacking US approval.

Peres remembered that fateful day in the White House. ‘I took (then) Ambassador Abe Herman with me and we climbed the steps to the back door.  We came in the room; Kennedy was sitting on his rocking chair and started asking questions.  Suddenly he asked, ‘do you have nuclear weapons?’  I told him, ‘Mr. President, Israel will not be the first to bring nuclear weapons into the Middle East.’ When we left, Ambassador Herman yelled at me, ‘Who let you say such a thing?’  I said, ‘What do you want me to do?  To tell Kennedy I was going to call (then prime minister) Eshkol and ask him?’ Several weeks later it became the official Israeli policy.  In my conversation with Kennedy, I outlined the ‘nuclear ambiguity’ policy.’

          Peres also explained how he managed to recruit the French for the job. …

(A year or so later)…(d)uring a helicopter ride over the northern Negev in the summer of 1960, American Ambassador Ogden Reed asked Adi Cohen of the Israeli Finance Ministry for an explanation regarding the extensive construction work in the area.  Cohen, the documents explain, was aware of the difficulties that were being encountered at the Israeli Finance Ministry over funding for the nuclear reactor.

Cohen was also concerned over a loss of American aid to Israel and the prospect that the tax-deductible status of American Jewish contributions to Israel would be eliminated.

He knew that Jerusalem architect Rudolf Trostler was planning industrial facilities in the Negev, including ‘Dimona Fibers’ so he used it as a cover story: ‘It’s a textile factory,’ Cohen told the ambassador on the spot.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

ROUNDEL POETRY PRIZE 
£3 ENTRY FEE. First Prize: £200. Second Prize: £100. Third Prize: £50. Deadline May 31, 2015. Open to anyone aged 18 or over. Poems are welcome on any subject. There is no limit to the number of entries per person. Must be written in English and no longer than 40 lines.



BEECHER’S 
$12 ENTRY FEE. Our contests in nonfiction, poetry, and fiction are now open until April 15, 2015. The first place winner in each category will receive $200 and publication in the print edition of Beecher’s 5. Runners-up may also be considered for publication in Beecher’s 5. Fiction and nonfiction submissions must be 4,000 words or less. Poets may include up to three poems per submission. All writers are welcome to submit more than once, but only one story or up to three poems per submission. All entrants will receive a copy of Beecher’s 5.

INKSHARES – CROWDFUNDING 
March was a big month for the Inkshares community! We launched new features (Inkshares Credits), announced new partnerships (Girl Friday Productions), redesigned our homepage, and saw some incredible books hit the platform. We hope you’re enjoying the crowdfunded book publishing journey as much as we are. Our model is simple: Authors pitch, readers fund, we publish.


THE PARIS REVIEW/STANDARD HOTEL WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE 
Deadline: April 8, 2015. Three weeks in a hotel at no cost. For the month of July. Applicants must have a book under contract. Applicants judged by editors of The Paris Review and Standard Culture. Open to prose or poetry, fiction, or nonfiction

INDIEGOGO – CROWDFUNDING 
The second largest crowdfunding resource on the web. Has a category like Kickstarter, with less fees, where it’s an all-or-nothing agreement in which you receive enough pledges for what you budgeted, or nothing. Another category lets you receive all the pledges regardless, with a higher administrative fee.

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Technical Writer (Contract) Hopkinton MA  
Create software/hardware documents including: release notes, user guides, and operator’s manuals for complex scientific instruments, with a strong emphasis on installation and maintenance procedures.
-Gather information through independent research interfacing with scientific, engineering, marketing, and service disciplines. 

 

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT FOR NATIONAL SAILING MAGAZINE (Middletown, RI)

Blue Water Sailing Media has a position open for an in-house, part-time editorial assistant. Qualified applicants should have a BA, a working knowledge of Microsoft Office programs, a keen eye for proofreading and knowledge of sailing, boats and marine terms.

 

News Editor/Reporter opening (Colchester)

The Essex Reporter and Colchester Sun, two family-owned newspapers in Vermont, are looking for a full-time editor/reporter with a proven track record of sound news judgment, solid editing and reporting experience and excellent time-management skills to join our growing weekly newspaper team. Sports experience a plus.

 

Blog Writer for Health/Fitness Food (Montreal)

A new fitness food brand launching this summer is looking for an experienced blog contributor who can write with a fun and edgy voice. The content will be geared towards health/fitness-enthusiasts and athletes. 

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING
"Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant" by Photorush - Own work.
“Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant” by Photorush – Own work.

Documentary on Nuclear Power

A Common Dreams posting that talks of a new documentary that delves into the grave historical issues surrounding nuclear power: “It delves specifically into the story of Gregory Jaczko, who was chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) when Japan’s Fukushima power plant suffered a major meltdown in 2013. The film alleges that Jaczko—an advocate of tightening safety controls at America’s aging nuclear facilities after the Fukushima disaster (his was the only dissenting vote on plans to build the first American nuclear plant in 30 years)—was ousted from the NRC by pro-industry forces who thought he was being “too aggressive” in his efforts to protect the public.”

Killer Robots

A Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists posting that discusses the many frightening implications of semi-autonomous destructive weapons: “But consensus about definitions is not the main problem; the heart of the matter is the need to prevent the loss of human control over fateful decisions in human conflict. The US military has been grappling with this issue for decades, because it has long been possible to build weapons that can hunt and kill on their own. An example is the Low-Cost Autonomous Attack System, a small cruise missile that was intended to loiter above a battlefield searching for a something that looked like a target, such as a tank, missile launcher, or personnel. The program was canceled in 2005, amid concerns about its reliability, controllability, and legality. But the winds have since shifted in favor of such weapons, with increasing amounts of money spent on research and development on robotic weapons that are able to seek out and hit targets on their own, without human intervention.”

U.S. DEPRESSION BREAD LINENational Labor Relations Board Dues 

A Chief Organizer post that discusses  the ramifications of recent decisions in union issues of dues or fee obligations for nonmembers in private sector employment: “Nonetheless, here’s the contradiction involved in right-to-work states under the current practice and operating assumptions of the National Labor Relations Act.  When a union is certified after an election or by demonstrating a clear majority of support from the workforce and achieving voluntary recognition from an employer, the only thing a union
really “wins” are the rights to attempt to bargain a contract over a twelve-month period, if done in good faith, and the fact that the employer cannot legally challenge the union’s majority for that period.  The union under US labor law is the “exclusive representative” of all of the bargaining unit workers.All individual deals that an employer might try to cut with a worker, no matter how favorable, are illegal, because of the exclusivity of the union’s representation.  Any issue involving wages, working conditions or terms and conditions of employment must be exclusively handled through the union.”

Funding Journalists

A Inside Philanthropy article that discusses the realities of funding for journalistic ventures, in the wake of a dwindling viability of for-profit media options:  “Nonprofit news has been booming over the past decade, as funders and entrepreneurial journalists have rushed to fill a void left by the decline of for-profit media. As they got going, some of these new ventures talked a good game about becoming self-sustaining over time by finding viable business models. 

That hasn’t happened. Rather, it seems, funders have acquired a bunch of new mouths to feed for the foreseesable future and, in turn, nonprofit journalists remain locked in financial relationships that are problematic in ways. “

book sq6Education Justice Sought

A TeleSur brief that announces the existence of a powerful student group in South America  that has made great strides in securing quality education for all: “Chilean students will take to the streets of Santiago on Thursday in defense of education reform as a legislative proposal they support is currently being discussed in Congress.   The government of Michelle Bachelet has committed to providing universal higher education by 2016 in response to massive student protests over the last few years demanding serious reforms to the country’s education system.”

Right To Health Care Declaration Blocked

A Global Research article that discusses the imperialist obstructions that the U.S. has imposed on a pan American economic summit, showing once again a desire to interfere at everyone’s cost:  “Bolivia’s President Evo Morales has blamed U.S. President Barack Obama for the failure of the recent OAS (Organization of American States) Summit of the Americas to issue a final declaration, and he says that a major sticking point for Mr. Obama was Obama’s opposition to a provision in the proposed declaration that would have said that health care is “a human right.” Mr. Obama insisted that it’s instead a privilege, access to which must be based primarily upon an individual’s ability-to-pay, as is the case in the United States. 

Said Mr. Morales: “One point (in the drafted declaration) was important: health as a human right, and the U.S. government did not accept that health should be considered a human right … President Obama did not accept” that concept.”

 

By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons
By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons

Addressing Inequality Through Capitalism

A Social Europe posting that discusses the imperative need to do something regarding global inequality, but only putting forward SOP ideas to do so: “Does this mean that current levels of inequality are inevitable and can only continue to deepen? The answer is no. The historical process is not quite as deterministic as implied in these pessimistic scenarios. As recognised by Piketty, models of capitalism are not set in stone. Social and political forces are dynamic and do change direction. There have been two seismic shifts of political economy over the last century: the first, the shift from the pre-war classical market model to the post-war era of regulated, egalitarian capitalism; then, another fundamental turning point, triggered by the stagflation crisis of the 1970s, ushered in the era of inequality-biased market fundamentalism. That model is still largely in place.

Narrowing today’s yawning income gaps will require a similar dose of transformative politics. Tinkering here and there through minor changes on tax and the level of the minimum wage, slightly more generous doses of redistributive welfare and the like – will not be enough to turn the rising inequality tide.”

diego rivera work labor Working Class Blog Studies Reality of Work

A blog that addresses working class perspectives from five different writers, who analyze the fisssured workplace of today: “I was thinking about that experience reading David Weil’s book The Fissured Workplace, a thoughtful and thought provoking reflection on the contemporary US workplace. By ‘fissured’ Weil means the wide range of ways in which work has been desiccated. Where traditional work was stable and intelligible, increasingly one is never sure who is responsible for the product supplied or service purchased. Weil outlines a number of types of fissuring, from subcontracting to outsourcing to franchising. Weil persuasively groups together a range of diverse strategies through which ownership and control are exercised through layer upon layer of intermediaries. The book offers a litany of corporate attempts to squeeze more profit from the bottom-line by laying-off risk and responsibility, citing examples from industries as diverse as cell phones, hotels, and coalmining. Fissuring is about saving money and restricting liability, ideally removing it all together.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Compensation Conversation

A Poynter article that cleverly used the example of pies in jars to illustrate techniques for having the sorts of conversations that can lead to better compensation for “Neville-Rehbehn led a session with Meredith Artley of CNN on compensation during the ONA-Poynter Leadership Academy for Women in Digital Media this week at Poynter. Here are five tips from Neville-Rehbehn on expanding the pie, getting what you want and having the compensation conversation.”

 

social media - jmarketing - flickr
social media – jmarketing – flickr

Twitter Too Fast

A Mediaite posting that discusses one person who has acknowledged that Twitter is not an ideal form of communication: ““I don’t think the speed helps dialogue. I think it’s why everything is kind of fucked up and polarizing, because people are going too fast, they’re trying to react too quickly,” C.K. mused, before going after the dangerous #hottake and the Twitter users mad that he only used the site to promote his shows (“That’s what the fuck it is!”)”

Piracy and Apps

A Wired article that discusses issues of piracy and copyrighted content in the wake of all the apps that allow information to be shared: “Yes, piracy is bad, and HBO is fully justified in protecting its lavish Daenerys and Dragons spectacle, as is Periscope in swiftly responding to valid, copyright-related takedown requests. But there are wildly varying degrees of bad in this world, and devoting serious resources to Periscope and Meerkat piracy is like swatting away a ladybug in a room full of vipers. “

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Politically Deconstructing a Popular Trope

A clever critique from Baffler of a much-ballyhooed book-to-TV series which demonstrates some of the common prejudices and SOP mentality as validated by the shows’ writers and fans: “The language here is more or less indistinguishable from a Tony Robbins seminar. And that’s not an accident. Every character in Game of Thrones lives in an environment of brutal, amoral, unceasing competition, where anyone can and will betray anyone else, where values and ideals are worthless because they prevent one from cultivating a properly sociopathic ambition, and where the audience’s focus and sympathy is encouraged to stay with the most effective sociopaths, who stand around in nice outfits plotting to attain more power and/or complaining that they don’t have enough of it, all while the vast, anonymous masses suffer and starve in filthy, background-filling anonymity.

Fantasy? Hell: this is corporate America in a codpiece.”

 

Braun HF 1
Braun HF 1

Native Advertising Problems

A Digiday post that analyzes the efficacy v. intrusiveness of native advertising, with the consequences of compromised true content: “Brands love to buy native advertising on popular news websites because it makes them look like not advertisers but part of the website, “part of the conversation.” Every organization involved is trying its God darnedest to not even call it the “A” word. Native advertising has even influenced the style of more traditional advertising. See: the aforementioned Dove campaign where the brand has bluntly, repeatedly crammed itself into a woman’s internal conversation about self-worth, a tactic that has apparently sold a lot of soap. But has it dirtied the brand, long-term? Check those numbers five years from now.

What nobody, including BuzzFeed, has been able to prove yet is whether native advertising sells one bit of product. I’ve argued no in the past. But is native advertising a good thing for news websites? Of course! It generates big money for BuzzFeed, Huffington Post and even legacy news sites such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. But how is it affecting the news brands of these sites?”

 

RECENT HAPPENINGS

318px-J_Gundlach_California_Vintage_1889Fighting Big Wine in Northern California

A Counter Currents article that discusses a recent meeting of sustainable agriculture and small farms advocates meeting to discuss the problem of giant monopoly wine producers, whose excesses are particularly egregious during this time of drought: “Sonoma County currently has 70,000 acres (and growing) of wine grapes and only 12,000 acres of food crops. As grapegrower Bill Shortridge says, “We’ve gone from an agriculture that benefitted all, to a monoculture that benefits a few.” Modifying an old statement, “One cannot live by wine alone.”

So what’s the beef? Big Wine controls around 80% of the market in Sonoma County. They take more than their fair share of the water we all need to survive, garden, hydrate our families, pets, plants, and farm animals.”

An Environmentally Damaging Project Gains Speed

A Radio Project posting that discusses a canal project in Central America that seems to be moving forward in spite of its terrible environmental effects: “Officially opening in 1914, the Panama Canal connected the Atlantic and Pacific creating a short-cut for ships. It was the biggest infrastructure project of its time. But originally the United States wanted to build the canal in Nicaragua. The plans shifted largely after French engineer Philippe-Jean Bunau-Varilla convinced U.S. lawmakers otherwise.

Well now the Nicaragua canal plans are back on the table. Nicaragua plans to build a $50 billion canal to connect the Caribbean and Pacific. Supporters argue it will create more than 250,000 jobs. But small farmers and environmentalists say the project will destroy Lake Nicaragua.”

 

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Radical Human Burial Ideas

A Care2 brief that discusses a radical but unexpected solution being posed as an answer to the eternal question of what to do with human remains: “Surely, you don’t want your body’s final act on earth to be further polluting the planet. So is there a better way?

Katrina Spade, founder of the Urban Death Project in Seattle, seems to think so. She believes that human bodies can be composted, just as some farmers do with livestock, at a fraction of the cost and in a way that will benefit the environment. In fact, she estimates this service would cost only about $2,500 — a fraction of the cost of a traditional burial. The idea is that the human body can be broken down into basic nutrients — like nitrogen and phosphorous — if given the proper circumstances. As it breaks down into life’s basic building blocks, the resulting compost can be used to nourish the soil and encourage new plant growth. It’s the same idea as composting fruit peels. Spade hopes to create a building with a 3 story core to accommodate grievers laying their loved ones to rest while initiating and overseeing the composting process.”

 

Mine Free Zone

Nueva Trinidad is the third municipality in El Salvador to hold a consultation on mining. (Photo: Sandra Cuffe)
A Truth-Out posting that discusses a recent triumph by citizen organizers in a Central American nation that has resisted mining, in spite of many setbacks and troubles: “The population of Nueva Trinidad voiced its resounding opposition to mining in an official municipal consultation process on March 29. In seven community voting centers, 99.25 percent of participating registered voters cast their ballots against metallic mining in Nueva Trinidad. The third consultation of its kind in the country, the local exercise in participatory democracy is the latest manifestation of the thriving national movement against mining in the small Central American nation. 
“We defend the territory by any means necessary here,” said Ana Dubón, youth secretary of CCR, the Association of Communities for the Development of Chalatenango.”

4.15.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

no trespassing signAs often as not, or in fact probably much more often than not, self-monitored censors that our parents and our priests and our proctors have inculcated over the years preclude our having anything even resembling a conversation that is at once full and frank and, most crucially, from all sides in its presentation.

Quote of the Day
“Mental illness, of course, is not literally a ‘thing’ — or physical object — and hence it can ‘exist’ only in the same sort of way in which other theoretical concepts exist.  Yet, familiar theories are in the habit of posing, sooner or later — at least to those who come to believe in them — as ‘objective truths’ (or ‘facts’). During certain historical periods, explanatory conceptions such as deities, witches, and microorganisms appeared not only as theories but as self-evident causes of a vast number of events.  I submit that today mental illness is widely regarded in a somewhat similar fashion, that is, as the cause of innumerable diverse happenings.  As an antidote to the complacent use of the notion of mental illness — whether as a self-evident phenomenon, theory, or cause — let us ask this question: What is meant when it is asserted that someone is mentally ill?
           In what follows I shall describe briefly the main uses to which the concept of mental illness has been put.  I shall argue that this notion has outlived whatever usefulness it might have had and that it now functions merely as a convenient myth.”  Thomas Szasz, from The Myth of Mental Illness 
This Day in History

cedar solidarity wood art wall of flameToday is both World Art Day and a Universal Day of Culture, while in the United States, Tax Day is also Jackie Robinson Day; at the Roman Lateran Council twelve hundred and forty-five years ago, attendees considered the fifth Byzantine Constantine’s oversight of the earlier Hierian gathering’s rejection of the use of mediating images in eighth century culture, rejecting in turn practically all of what the former convocation had abjured about much of what was then—and now—possible to accomplish in representation; three centuries and two years subsequently, in 1071, in a more tangible manifestation of the Eastern-Western Roman imperial contention, the Byzantine’s gave up all claim to Bari in Southern Italy; six hundred twenty years prior to the present pass, in internecine rivalries among Mongol leaders, the forces of Timur crush the armies of Tokhtamysh of the Golden Horde and force their leaders absconding with himself to Lithuania; a half century and half a decade henceforth, in 1450, France wound down the Hundred Years’ War, another case of internecine rivalry, with a devastating victory over the British, forever ending English pretensions of dominion over Northern France; seven hundred thirty days after that moment in time and space, in 1452, an Italian baby boy came squealing into the world who would grow to become

Da Vinci Codex
Da Vinci Codex

the redoubtable genius, Leonardo da Vinci; exactly three centuries and another three years beyond that conjunction, in 1755, Samuel Johnson published the first edition of A Dictionary of the English Language in London; two hundred thirty-two years back, the new United States and the United Kingdom both ratified initial agreements to end the American war for independence; just two years short of two centuries before the here and now, Thomas H. Gallaudet and collaborators oversaw the foundation of the first college for the deaf in Hartford, Connecticut; just a year past a quarter-century thereafter, in 1843, an English male child was born whose destiny was to compose strange tales as the American writer Henry James; a decade and a half later still, in 1858, a baby boy came along on the other side of both the Atlantic and the English Channel to cry out as the child who would mature as renowned sociologist and theorist, Emile Durkheim; a hundred twenty-six years prior to this precise point in time, two U.S. baby boys entered our midst who would grow up as working class stalwart A. Phillip Randolph, on the one hand, and upper crust painterly genius, Thomas Hart Benton, on the other hand; just three years hence, in 1892, in a consolidation that foretold the coming depression, General Electric first existed as a corporate ‘person;’ eight years after that moment, in 1900 on the other side of the world Filipino rebels rose up to reject U.S. oversight, laying siege to American troops for the first time at Catubig; two decades on the dot closer to now, in 1920,two security guards died in a shootout and robbery in South Braintree, Massachusetts, for which deaths the anarchists Bartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco eventually died from State-sanctioned electrocution, and across the ocean and part of the European landmass in Hungary, a baby boy took an initial breath on his way to a life as radical psychiatrist and social critic Thomas Szasz; two years afterward, in 1922, back in the United States a male infant cried out who would eventually lead Chicago as Mayor Harold Washington; three hundred sixty-five days after that conjunction, in 1923, insulin first became the treatment of choice for diabetes; another year further onward, in 1924, Rand McNally

A Rand McNally map appended to the 1914 edition of The New Student's Reference Work.
A Rand McNally map appended to the 1914 edition of The New Student’s Reference Work.

published its first road atlas; eighty-four years ago, a Swedish baby boy  was born who would go on to great acclaim for his poetry, up to his 1911 Nobel Prize as Tomas Transtromer, just a few weeks deceased; four years later, across the Atlantic in the District of Columbia in 1935, the members of the Pan American Union signed the Roerich Pact, a little known yet influential agreement for the protection of scientific research and cultural production and historical artifacts in the signatory countries; another leap year subsequently, in 1936, across the Atlantic in the Eastern Mediterranean, Palestinian Arabs rose up in civil war against Jewish immigration to Mandatory Palestine, intense region-wide combat that ultimately failed to forestall the coming of Israel but about which very few contemporary citizens are even aware; nine years after the initiation of that four years of carnage, in 1945, British troops liberated the handfuls of survivors of the Bergen Belsen concentration camp; two more peaceful years after that point, in 1947, Jackie Robinson ‘broke the color line’ and debuted for the Brooklyn Dodgers; fifty-five years ago, at historically Black Shaw University, Ella Baker oversaw a conference that led to the formation of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee; two decades after that point, in France in 1980, the both beloved and despised Nobel Laureate, Jean Paul Sartre, breathed his last; near Rome four years later, in 1984, the first World Youth Day took place in Vatican City; two more years more proximate to this time of ours, in 1986, back in France, working class hero and writer of multiple genres, Jean Genet, died; two years back, the Boston Marathon underwent a bombing that instituted martial law and has resulted in a just-completed trial of the Chechen immigrant convicted of responsibility for that carnage. From Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"mental illness" OR add OR adhd OR depression OR schizophrenia critique OR criticism OR doubt existence OR validity bullshit OR distortion OR fraud "political economy" "drug companies" szasz OR hillman OR laing OR breggin OR glasser = 4,260 Hits.

book hor

TOP OF THE FOLD

Murderous Impunity Again and Again and Again

http://www.washingtonpost.com       From WaPo, something that the Post does better than any U.S. media outlet at this juncture, which is to say analysis–meaning, by the bye, taking apart the data and putting together a narrative that accounts for it–in this case about the waves of protofascist police-state violence that overwhelmingly are afflicting people of color now, having resulted in literally uncounted thousands of deaths of unarmed civilians in the past decade alone, roughly one out of a hundred of which result in any prosecution whatsoever of police, in turn one of thousands of accounts from recent times about this issue, including a Guardian report about a mentally ill, naked Georgian vet’s recent murder, a Common Dreams assessment about recent waves of protests against police predation in dozens of cities, a DailyKos article about the murder of a handcuffed, shackled woman in a suburban Virginia District of Columbia jail cell, aThinkProgress news-analysis of the vicious beating that resulted in a National Basketball Association player’s broken legs at the hands of New York’s finest, a Chief Organizer’s Blog post about the convicted teachers in Atlanta, and a pair of pieces of particular import to writers about citizen rights to record such incidents or obtain government-created recordings, all of which supplement the Post account of a litany of impunity that currently attends police violence against unarmed citizens whom they’ve arrested or are seeking to arrest: “In Cleveland, Officer Michael Brelo, who is white, was indicted for killing a pair of black suspects after a grand jury reviewed a wide range of evidence, including nearly two dozen video recordings from dashboard cameras, traffic cameras and surveillance cameras mounted at businesses and a school.

The deadly encounter began when the pair, Timothy Russell, 43, and Malissa Williams, 30, drove past the Cleveland police headquarters on a November night in 2012 and their Chevy Malibu fatefully backfired.  Officers mistook the sound for gunfire and went in pursuit.  Soon, 62 police vehicles were chasing the Chevy through city streets at speeds of up to 110 mph.

The cameras captured the furious pursuit with officers’ Dodge Chargers rocketing past repeated red lights and weaving through traffic at breakneck speed, tires squealing as panicked drivers peeled onto the shoulders.

The suspects, later found to be under the influence of drugs, came to a stop in a middle school parking lot.  Eleven officers got out of their cars and formed a semicircle around the Chevy, court records show.  Although two police radio broadcasts had reported that the pair was unarmed, according to transmissions compiled by state investigators, the officers opened fire, shooting 139 times.

Brelo himself fired 34 shots at the car and then climbed onto the hood of the Chevy and fired 15 more times ‘at close range’ through the windshield, state investigation records show.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

LAST CALL FOR OUR FICTION & ESSAY CONTEST
23rd Annual Tom Howard/John H. Reid Fiction & Essay Contest
Two top prizes of $1,500 each. 10 Honorable Mentions of $100 each. Winning entries published online. Accepts published and unpublished work. Fee: $16 per entry. Final judge: Arthur PowersSubmit online by April 30.

Nimrod Poetry Prize – Deadline: April 30. It’s time to enter the 37th annual Nimrod Literary Awards: The Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry and The Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction. The Awards offer first prizes of $2,000 and publication, and second prizes of $1,000 and publication. Winners will also be brought to Tulsa for the Awards Ceremony in October. All finalists will be considered for publication. For complete rules, visit Nimrod’s website: www.utulsa.edu/nimrod

 

Sequestrum Reprint Award – 2015

Deadline: April 30. The 2015 Editor’s Reprint Award at Sequestrum offers $200 and publication in the Summer ’15 issue for one previously-published selection of fiction or nonfiction, and a minimum of one runner-up will receive publication and payment at our usual rates (plus a little extra). Finalists listed on the website. Enter online. No length or theme restrictions.

SilkWords (est. 2013) has updated its submission guidelines and is inviting authors to write for its line of short, interactive romance and erotica books. A typical Silkwords book blends the concepts of romance and gaming–it allows readers to decide different paths in the story’s plot, thus creating a new story direction and experience each time. $500 advance.
Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission

Love Hurts Anthology – Pays $200 –  Independent fiction publisher Meerkat Press is seeking submissions for Love Hurts, a planned anthology of short stories that revolve around broken love. The editor welcomes stories of cheats, scandals, love triangles, weird relationships, dating hazards, etc. Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

– Gannett Co. Inc. : Our Celebrities & What’s Trending Reporter (Cincinnati-OH) – 04/08/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9018

The Associated Press : News Editor (Kansas City-MO) – 04/07/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9021

– The Commerical Appeal : Football Beat Reporter (Memphis-TN) – 04/09/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9023

Greeley CO – Are you a recent grad looking for a week long assignment at a college in Greeley? Up to $20 an hour.  We are looking for individuals that have great grammar and communication skills to help new students in the process of applying, getting student ID’s, register for classes, etc. 

Part-time Test Reader / Scorer (Longmont, CO)

 Requirements
– Bachelors degree completed (able to verify with transcripts) OR 48 completed college credit hours 
– Ability to sit for 5 hours per day
– Strong attention to detail
– Ability to follow directions
– Computer skills 

compensation: $11.50/hr

 

Web Content Writer (North Mankato MN)

Love getting your hands on new toys before your friends? Do you like dressing up like a superhero? Is Hello Kitty one of your best pals? Do you know an insane amount of information about Star Wars, Doctor Who, Game of Thrones, and every other pop culture property out there (like, way too much knowledge for your own good)? If you answered “Heck yes, I do!” to these questions, then we might have a place for you on our Web Content team at Fun.com. compensation: $11/hr

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

"Heiwa elementary school 18" by ajari from Japan - cc 2.0
“Heiwa elementary school 18” by ajari from Japan – cc 2.0

Educational Scandal

A Chief Organizer blog about the issues brought up through the issues inherent in the Atlanta educational testing scandal, showing the deep gaps in justice in the education system: “The teaching and testing travesty in Atlanta has been a bitter indictment of almost everything that is off the rails in the US educational system.  When mandatory testing becomes the only measurement of teaching and educational standards, and the testing itself is seen as biased, unfair, and unjust, the temptation for administrators to see an unwritten exemption from normal rules and moral hazards is ever present. In Atlanta, in a vast conspiracy, it seems to have been irresistible.”

 

Bob Jagendorf
Bob Jagendorf

Notes from the Oppressed

A moving poignant reprint on Common Dreams from a brave woman in Federal Prison for participating in anti-drone protest: “We could awake into the world, build affinities between the suffering people locked in Atwood Hall and its managers, between the struggling rural community of Clinton and the urban desperate they wait to see bused in. Just about everyone longs to raise their children in a world where drought, storms, and brutal want won’t loom as insoluble, inevitable catastrophes. Working together we could reclaim misspent resources and correct misguided policies. Our fear and isolation from each other, aiming to get a step up above our neighbors, our reluctance to live in a shared world, may be worse than the other storms we face.”

Police Corruption

A Daily Kos repost about a police officer implicated in conspiring to put others in jail through planting and intimidating: “Fifteen years later, an FBI case revealed a different Jeffrey Walker, then a member of the Narcotics Field Unit. Busted in a sting in May 2013 – the FBI caught him stealing money from a drug dealer – Walker pleaded guilty and began cooperating with federal investigators.

Walker, who is in federal custody awaiting sentencing for his February 2014 guilty plea in federal court, faces a maximum of life behind bars.

In the meantime, he is expected to be a star witness this week in the federal trial against six Philadelphia narcotics officers arrested with his help: Thomas Liciardello, Perry Betts, John Speiser, Michael Spicer, Linwood Norman – Walker’s longtime partner on the narcotics unit – and Brian Reynolds, Walker’s old “Robin.””

 

By JKMMX (Own work) cc 3.0
By JKMMX (Own work) cc 3.0

New Impactful Film

An EcoWatch article that announces a film that discusses one of the many dire straits facing the world: “This Earth Day, a new film, The OceanMaker, will debut on YouTube. Austin-based animation studio Mighty Coconut is releasing the 3D animated short film which highlights how precious our water resources are. The film, which has appeared in many film festivals including SXSW, is set in a dystopian future where the seas have vanished and a young female pilot has to battle sky pirates for the last of the remaining water residing in the clouds. The 10-minute long film contains no dialogue, only music provided by a live orchestra and 60-person choir.”

Gender Equality and Pay

An Economic Policy Institute that discusses problems with pay inequality that persist: “April 14 is Equal Pay Day, a perfect opportunity to reflect upon the fact that women in our country still earn less than men. The figure below shows hourly wages in 2014 for men and women across the wage distribution. At every decile, men out-earn women. At the median, women’s hourly wages are only 83 percent of men’s hourly wages.”

 

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Investing in Journalism

A Poynter posting that talks about ongoing investment in journalism and new technology by a long standing journalism foundation: “Now, in honor of NewsU’s 10th birthday, Knight is making a new investment of $195,000 in the leading online training site for journalists, educators and anyone interested in the craft and values of journalism. Knight funding will support the first phase of the most ambitious rethinking and retooling of Poynter NewsU since it was launched in April 2005.

“This grant will expand NewsU’s capacity as the leader in online training that shapes the transformation of journalists worldwide and allows them to experience Poynter everywhere,” said Poynter President Tim Franklin. “We are grateful that we can continue Knight’s partnership to help us reach NewsU’s full potential across new platforms with new tools and technologies.””

 

"Cocacola-5cents-1900 edit2" by derivative work: Victorrocha
“Cocacola-5cents-1900 edit2” by derivative work: Victorrocha

Advertising Incubation Attempt

A Media Post article that discusses attempts to incubate programs that can heal the financing woes of those who seek to profit off writing: “Some of ad technology’s biggest players started in a garage. Now one of the sector’s biggest is flipping the model and launching a “garage.” In an effort to accelerate innovation and growth for new players to enter the audience exchange marketplace, publicly-traded Rubicon Project today will unveil its latest project, aptly named The Garage. The unit, which has been secretly in development for months, is basically a research and development arm designed to kickstart innovative new solutions for players on all sides of the audience supply chain. Not surprisingly, its first two initiatives service the demand- and supply-sides respectively, and are designed to enable new entrants to come to market.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Ludicrous Contextualization of Police Abuse

A DailyKos reposting of a ridiculous but typical ‘blame the victim’ contextualization from the proto fascist news outlet we all know and love: “Jeanine punctuates that with the end of her pointer finger! Through the dead and poisoned tissue of her face, Jeanine says, “I agree.”

Larry makes a good point. All of the police officers who keep murdering unarmed citizens need some of your empathy. Seriously, those dead guys are dead. They’re in hell or heaven or wherever. They don’t care anymore, but the police officer has to plant evidence and work for hours in the mirror making sad and scared faces for his inevitable statement and/or video-taped interview.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

pens Keith Williamson Flickr
pens Keith Williamson Flickr

Math Stumper Solved

A Mashable posting of a challenging math problem’s answer that students in Singapore were expected to respond, and which demonstrate the quality of education that students are receiving… elsewhere in the world: “Just when you thought math couldn’t get any harder.

A TV presenter in Singapore recently brought up a math problem that has been driving the Internet crazy.

At first, the problem seems impossible to solve. But once you use some logic, the solution is actually rather simple. Rattle your brain — or phone a friend —before you look at the solution below the picture.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

David Wright CC 2.0
David Wright CC 2.0

Terrorism and Electric Grid

A National Press Academies listing of a book that could be of interest to anyone studying issues of energy, terrorism, and the general mayhem that threatens to erupt at any given moment: “The electric power delivery system that carries electricity from large central generators to customers could be severely damaged by a small number of well-informed attackers. The system is inherently vulnerable because transmission lines may span hundreds of miles, and many key facilities are unguarded. This vulnerability is exacerbated by the fact that the power grid, most of which was originally designed to meet the needs of individual vertically integrated utilities, is being used to move power between regions to support the needs of competitive markets for power generation. Primarily because of ambiguities introduced as a result of recent restricting the of the industry and cost pressures from consumers and regulators, investment to strengthen and upgrade the grid has lagged, with the result that many parts of the bulk high-voltage system are heavily stressed.”

4.16.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

files squareGetting organized is much easier to imagine than to attain, at the same time that successful projects to accomplish such aims almost always consist of the same elements, of envisioning a goal or desired final state, strategizing the positioning and engagement of others that will permit the reaching of that objective, and then planning, step by step, the necessary action that will achieve the end that one has seen and fantasized about gaining.

Quote of the Day
“Moreover, I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states.  I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in Birmingham.  Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.  We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.  Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.  Never again can we afford to live with the narrow, provincial ‘outside agitator’ idea.  Anyone who lives inside the United States can never be considered an outsider anywhere within its bounds.
         You deplore the demonstrations taking place in Birmingham.  But your statement, I am sorry to say, fails to express a similar concern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations.  I am sure that none of you would want to rest content with the superficial kind of social analysis that deals merely with effects and does not grapple with underlying causes.  It is unfortunate that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city’s white power structure left the Negro community with no alternative.”  Martin Luther King A Letter From the Birmingham Jail 
This Day in History
"Emancipation Day in Richmond, Virginia, 1905"
“Emancipation Day in Richmond, Virginia, 1905”

Today in the District of Columbia is Emancipation Day, and around the planet, some people celebrate World Voice Day; in the time-out-of-mind conflicted regions of Southwest Asia, roughly thirty four hundred and seventy-two years back, the biblical Battle of Megiddo transpired between Canaanite, or Semitic Palestinian, forces and the troops of Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose; one thousand, five hundred and twenty years subsequently, more or less, in 73, Current Era, Roman legions succeeded in overthrowing the fortress of Masada in the same area, effectively extinguishing the Great Jewish Revolt; six hundred sixty-nine years before today’s passage, a Serbian, Dusan, rose to imperial dominance and maintained a realm in the Balkans and Southeast Europe that represented the last gasp in the region of Orthodoxy, vis-à-vis the advancing Ottomans; in Spain five years shy of five centuries prior to the present pass, communities rose in revolt against Holy Roman Emperor and Spanish king, the fifth Charles and son of Joanna the Mad; a year later, in 1521, in Central Europe, Martin Luther made his first appearance before the Diet of Worms; two hundred thirty-five years back, municipal leaders in Muenster, Germany founded the city’s University on the basis of the Jesuit college there, forming what has become the nation’s third-largest research institution; almost but not quite two decades afterward, in 1799, a thousand miles to the Southeast, Napoleon’s

"La Bataille du mont Tabor, en Syrie, le 27 germinal an VI by Louis François Lejeune Salon de 1804"
“La Bataille du mont Tabor, en Syrie, le 27 germinal an VI by Louis François Lejeune Salon de 1804”

armies defeated Ottoman forces at the Battle of Mount Tabor, on the River Jordan; another nineteen years thereafter, in 1818, across the Atlantic, a more equable border settlement occurs as the U.S. and Canada agree to the strictures of the Rush-Bagot Treaty; a decade henceforth, in 1828, magnificent Spanish Painter Francisco Goya breathed his last; a year more than two decades beyond that ending, in 1849 to the Northeast in France, a baby boy began his life on his way to fame as beloved novelist, Nobel Prize winner, and socialist Anatole France; ten years closer still to the present day, in 1859, also in France, historian and chronicler Alexis de Tocqueville died; one hundred fifty-three years prior to the present pass, in a fit of something like reverse reparations, the U.S. Government paid slaveowners in the District of Columbia to manumit the African Americans whom they held as chattel; just a year less that three decades after that moment in time, in 1881, Bat Masterson took part in his last shootout in Dodge City, Kansas, before going on to journalistic and gambling renown from the Arizona Territory to New York City; across the Atlantic in London eight years subsequently, in 1889, a baby boy was born who would rise from ‘difficult’ circumstances to lead United Artists as Charlie Chaplin, where he would make films till, because of anticommunism, he fled the United States where he had settled; three years later, in 1892, on the North American side of the Atlantic, a male infant uttered his first cry en route to a storied life as an English professor, Howard Mumford Jones, who opened in his office the first book store at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; ninety-eight years prior

"Lenin-Switzerland"
“Lenin-Switzerland”

to this precise conjunction, Lenin returned from Switzerland to a Russia wracked by war and ready to experiment with ending imperial capital’s reign altogether; four years to the day after that juncture, in 1921, in England a child of the multiple diasporas of World War One and its revolutionary upheavals came into the world, destined to go on to fame and accomplishment as actor, director, writer, and savant Peter Ustinov; the very next year, back in Central Europe in 1922, Germany and the young Soviet Union established diplomatic ties through the Treaty of Rapallo, and, back in England the baby boy entered the world who would mature to be the popular and critically appreciated novelist, Kingsley Amis; three years later, in 1925 in the Balkans, the Romanian Communist Party in Sofia sought to decapitate the entire national leadership with a huge bomb inside a church at a funeral for an assassinated noble, a plot that not only failed but also led to the downfall of the party itself; seventy years back, meanwhile, the Soviet Army engaged German troops in the final assault on Berlin as Nazi Germany’s thousand year Reich came to pieces after twelve years of mayhem and carnage; three hundred sixty-five days after that, in 1946, in the Mississippi Delta a baby girl was born who would grow up as Wiccan spiritual leader, environmentalist, and thinker Margot Adler; one more year still more proximate to the current day, in 1947, financier Bernard

Cold War Poster
Cold War Poster

Baruch coined the term, Cold War, to describe U.S. relations with is former Soviet Allies, who bore a majority of all the military casualties of World War Two; almost but not quite a decade and a half further down the road, in 1961, Fidel Castro delivered a speech to the Cuban people in which he declared himself a Marxist and proposed to develop a Communist government in his island nation; seven hundred thirty days down the pike and across the Cuban Straits, in 1963, in Alabama, Martin Luther King penned A Letter From the Birmingham Jail to answer his critics, many of whom were virulent anti-communists; forty-three years back, on the other side of the world, Japan’s first literary Nobel Laureate, Yasunari Kawabata, drew his final breath; twenty-two years hence, in 1994, back in the U.S. Black literary icon Ralph Ellison died; nine years on the dot beyond that point, across the Atlantic in 2003, Europe agreed to the Treaty of Accession, which invited ten new members in the European Union, many of them former communist countries that the U.S. and its allies had sworn would never be part of NATO or the EU; four years later, in 2007, a much reported anti-depressant mass murder occurred on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg;six years farther along, in 2013, Native American anthropologist and curator of indigenous culture George Horse-Capture spent his last day in the land of the living. From Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"nuclear weapons" "atmospheric tests" cancer OR leukemia "lack of research" OR ignorance OR overlooked OR "not fully studied" = 50,900 Results.

book hor

TOP OF THE FOLD
PARADOXES AND SYNTHESES OF THE FIGHT-FOR-FIFTEEN

http://www.telesurtv.net    An in-depth report from TeleSur’s opinion pages, both sympathetic and critical, both paradoxical and synthetic, both richly historical and incisively empirical about ‘on-the-ground’ realities, that details the problems and prospects of the Service Employees International Union’s Fight-for-Fifteen drive, which has had tremendous impact in some place, has led to massive reporting about labor where roughly zero stories had previously dealt with living-on-minimum wage, and has generated immense leverage against worker-crushing companies like MacDonald’s and Walmart, at the same time that the strategy for consolidating and amplifying these gains appears weak or at least not readily apparent: “SEIU has far more resources to confront employer threats of firing and retaliation, but creating a shop-by-shop base of power would still be a monumental task.  Fight for 15 could nurture worker power other ways, but it has forgone a bottom-up struggle.  Its worker leaders serve to energize other workers, relate a compelling personal story and act as a media spokesperson.  
          In other words, they provide the image of a leader rather than the substance of a leader who can organize the workplace, engage in shop-floor warfare against the boss, develop worker solidarity, and force concessions while building a militant rank and file.  The site of worker power in Fight for 15 is supposed to be the organizing committees, but within the staff-driven campaign participants say workers have little power. 

"July 29, 2013 Protestor" by Annette Bernhardt
“July 29, 2013 Protestor” by Annette Bernhardt

          Strike votes are usually not held unless the staff leadership is confident it will win.  Meetings are for pumping up workers and feeding them information, not democratic debate and decision-making.  The annual Fight for 15 conferences, with the next one reportedly set for this summer in Detroit, are described as heavily scripted. 
           I asked one organizer if it was true that worker leaders made decisions during weekly national conference calls.  The response was, ‘That’s bullshit, and I know because I participate in those calls.’  Plus, one person says during a strategy session Scott Courtney was introduced to workers as ‘the reason you are all here.’  Compare this to  SEIU’s claim in 2013 that it is following the lead of fast-food workers and ‘We don’t yet understand the scale of it’ when in fact it gave birth to the fast-food workers campaign. 
           Where there is organizing in Fight for 15, it is more in the streets than in the workplace.  The big days of action are vital for the sense of momentum.  Allies from community groups, students, and union staff swell numbers, add to the festivity, make a more favorable media impression, sway public opinion, and make it look as if the campaign is growing.  One can make the case that SEIU made a sound decision in forgoing a worker-centric campaign for a P.R. and legal strategy.  But then it can no longer said to be a worker-driven movement. 
           If SEIU admitted workers’ fear of being fired or disciplined by employers leads to high turnover in Fight for 15, it would undermine the perception that more and more fast-food workers are joining and staying with the campaign.  A lack of power also means workers follow the dictates of paid organizers, who in turn say they get their marching orders from SEIU leaders.  A few organizers have mentioned SEIU’s P.R. firm, BerlinRosen Public Affairs, is involved in the strategy.  In fact, a 25-page document entitled Strike in a Box, which bears BerlinRosen’s logo, is presented as a how-to-guide for building a successful strike.  This and other documents provide more evidence for the top-down management of Fight for 15, which is logical given the enormous effort devoted to organizing just one protest in one city.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

Cosmonauts Avenue and Summer Literary Seminars (SLS) are calling for entries to their SLS Montreal Flash Fiction Prize. The winner receives free tuition to any SLS Montreal mini-program, $100, and publication. Arjun Basu is the judge.

UK-based Structo is still accepting submissions of short fiction, poetry, and poetry in translation.

Northern Michigan University’s Passages North seeks entries for their 2015 Thomas J. Hrushka Memorial Nonfiction and Elinor Benedict Poetry Prizes. The winners receive $1,000 each.

Hotel Amerika is calling for work that challenges, confounds, invigorates, and rewards the plasticity of genre boundaries in their TransGenre Writing Contest.

 VidCon 2015 is calling for musicians to apply for their Open Mic Contest. Winners will perform a 15-minute set on the Festival Stage at the Anaheim Convention Center in California.

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Today’s listings were put together by Asta, Michael, Landon, JR, Laurie, and your team at Submittable. If you have news that you think we missed, please send it to newsletter@submittable.com. Got high-quality writing or artwork related to publishing or digital media? Consider submitting it to our blog. If you enjoy what you read here, please forward it to help spread the word. New readers can subscribe here. Thanks!
pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

– Gannett Co. Inc. : Our Celebrities & What’s Trending Reporter (Cincinnati-OH) – 04/08/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9018

– The Associated Press : Digital Products Producer (New York-NY) – 04/12/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9027

– Gannett Co. Inc. : Social Policy Reporter (Lafayette-IN) – 04/13/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=9028

 

EDITOR for CHRISTIAN BOOK: part time (Tulsa OK) 

SEEKING DEGREED PERSON with sharp editorial skills for part-time work on an unusual Christian type book in progress. Experience preferred but not required. Very flexible work that can be done at your home on your schedule and could be done even while working full-time elsewhere. Compensation: to be discussed/open

 

Copywriter / Social Media Marketing (Branson MO)

The Copywriter/Social Media Marketer is expected to possess an aptitude for creating copy for projects such as emails, landing pages, blogs, white papers, digital advertising, a wide variety of printed marketing collateral, an awareness of the company’s copy/design capabilities, an understanding of industry standards and practices related to copywriting/Social Media, and the ability to coordinate project flow and deadlines. Additionally, the Copywriter/Social Media position will be responsible for tasks such as social media post, assisting department manager, website content, company wide copy proofer, and additional tasks as assigned. Compensation: Starting pay rate depends on experience

 

Solar Energy Research & Writing Opportunity (Work from home) 

At Generator Holdings, we believe that the key to advancing renewable energy usage is through education. We are looking for several residential solar writers who will research solar energy topics and write accessible and interesting articles for our websites. Successful writers will continue to receive additional work from us as our business grows! Compensation: $11 per hour or project equivalent

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

"Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing" por W. Müller
“Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing” por W. Müller

Effective Alternative to Drug Crimes

A City Lab posting that discusses a radical yet simple solution to drug crime problems which shows an effectiveness that completely obscures all other traditional punitive tactics, and which society might want to consider: “Researchers at the University of Washington followed 203 participants in Seattle’s Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion program, or LEAD, over varying lengths of time—anywhere from six months to nearly three years, depending on when participants joined the program. When the researchers compared them with a control group of 115 people who had been arrested, jailed, and prosecuted in the usual fashion, they found that the LEAD participants were 34 percent to 58 percent less likely than their counterparts to have committed new crimes since the original arrest. “

Conscientious Objector

An Aeon interview with a military dissident, whose words shed a light on some of the disenchantments present in being a member of the war economy: “I start thinking, ‘OK, I’ve got some bad leaders.’ But, really, they had bad ideas. Everyone seemed to have bad ideas. I saw this at the level of captains, majors, lieutenant colonels, and up and up and up. If everyone has these bad ideas, and it doesn’t stop no matter how high the rank, maybe what we’re doing is a bad idea. So in 2010, I started seeing a therapist, to try and talk some of these thoughts through.”

Fight for Livable Wage Grows

A Guardian posting that analyses the growing fight for a livable minimum wage, a struggle that has proven to be the biggest low-wage workers in U.S. history: “The demonstrations were the latest in a series of strikes that began with fast-food workers in New York in November 2012. The movement has since attracted groups outside the restaurant industry: Wednesday’s protesters included home-care assistants, Walmart workers, child-care aides, airport workers, adjunct professors and other low-wage workers. It also sparked international support, with people protesting against low wages in Brazil, New Zealand and the UK.”

 

By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons
By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons

Deregulation Not Valuable Tactic

A Social Europe article that discusses findings that question the main IMF tactics for dealing with the financial crisis: “This is important, and not just for the bail-out countries. Indeed, ever since 2000, when European policy makers drew up the famous Lisbon Strategy of making the EU the most competitive economy in the world by pursuing a strategy of innovation, some have promoted the claim that very flexible labour markets are essential in boosting innovation. If business could fire workers easily, then new and innovative firms would be able to attract the new workers they need to expand their business. Likewise, the greater wage differentials that would emerge when Europe got rid of its multi-employer collective bargaining system would propel the work force out from companies in decline and cutting wages into the firms of the future. It is the story of ‘creative destruction’ told by Schumpeter after WWII. This story may well be old but it has been extremely well ‘marketed’ by the European Commission and related institutions and interest groups over the past decade. It is to the credit of the IMF researchers that this myth is now being exposed – in a flagship publication of the financial elite itself.”

NYC strike protest Athena Saldana FlickrA Demonstration Against Energy Commission

An EcoWatch announcement of an end-of-May demonstration against the actions of the federal agency supposedly in charge of making rational and effective energy decisions: “Why FERC? Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. has called them “a rogue agency, a captive agency.” FERC is the federal agency which, among other duties, has to approve proposed interstate natural gas pipelines, compressor stations, export terminals and other gas infrastructure. And approve is what they do; they are a rubber stamp for the fracking industry.

At this time of crisis, we need a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that does what is right, not a weak body whose funding comes from fees paid by the gas industry and other fossil fuel companies they “regulate.” As a result, they function as if they were being paid by the fossil fuel industry.”

Diversified City Council

A Mashable article that announces the more inclusive city council election results that have occurred after the recent tragedy in Ferguson, and viewed by some as a sufficient step forward in regards to social justice issues: “The election comes as the city continues to heal after white former police officer Darren Wilson killed 18-year-old Brown in August, prompting temporary rioting and since then perennial protests. Wilson was not indicted for Brown’s death, but the killing prompted a scathing Department of Justice report that details a history of racial bias in the police department.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Teachers Blues

teacher student

An Education Week Teacher opinion piece that touches on the very real obstacles to being a satisfied and effective educator in a world that undervalues and guts education: “There’s tons of data on why teachers quit: low pay, no respect, borderline exploitation, difficult work-life balance, lack of job security, unsupportive administrators, and unruly students. There’s also data on how to maximize teacher retention: performance bonuses, collaborative teams, teacher mentors, parental involvement, and actually useful professional development. But I want to know the physical, emotional, and psychological effects of teaching on veteran teachers, and on those who escape and suffer the aftermath. Some, like peppy Teach For America corps members who serve a simple two years, love teaching and have fond memories, while many others may rightfully suffer a form of post-traumatic stress disorder.

I’m nearing the end of my 6th and final year of teaching. It’s my final year in education because I’m honestly worried that teaching is turning me into a terrible person. “

Poems Explore Past

A Library of Congress posting that looks at the power of poetry to safeguard history and help future people understand past experiences: ” When ethnographers collect poetry in the course of a fieldwork project, they are often looking for something in addition to a recitation of an entertaining poem. Poetry, like songs or stories, can tell us something about the culture in which it is found, the local ideas about what makes a good poem, information about languages and dialects, and may also provide clues about the things most valued among the people the ethnographer studies. Ethnographers may document local poets reciting poems they composed themselves, poems current in the oral tradition of a community or ethnic group, and published poetry that have come to be part of a community’s traditions in some way…. Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin recorded many types of music, song, and speech from migrant workers in California, including poetry. Many of the migrants had escaped the dust bowl conditions in the Midwest and many had not been agriculturalists before having to abandon their homes and communities.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

 

Marcelo Graciolli flickr
Marcelo Graciolli flickr

Profiteers Attacking Affordable Internet

An Ars Technica posting that discusses the lengths that reactionary organizations will go to block affordable internet for communities: “The fight is happening between the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) and Credo Action. ALEC opposes municipal broadband projects and writes model legislation that limits the authority of cities and towns to build their own telecommunications networks. About 20 states have passed such laws.

Credo Action is the advocacy arm of cellular phone company Credo Mobile, whose revenue funds its advocacy. Credo lobbied the Federal Communications Commission to preempt state laws that limit municipal broadband, criticizing ALEC along the way.

RECENT HAPPENINGS

Another Police Killing

A Government Executive posting about another terrible police killing, and the multiple evidences of police overreaching and culpability: “When an incident does turn fatal, the police officer’s version of events often proves difficult to contest. An anonymous bystander’s video, though, made the Scott case different. Slager’s report said that Scott had taken his Taser and that the officer felt threatened. But the video revealed that Scott had been running away from Slager when he fired eight shots into his back. It also showed Slager picking something up and then dropping it near Scott’s body—perhaps the Taser. The footage changed it from another disputed tragedy into a murder case.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

Hiroshima public domain
Hiroshima public domain

Recovering Communities After Disasters

A National Academies Press posting of a book necessary to all interested in the recovery of communities after disasters:  “In the devastation that follows a major disaster, there is a need for multiple sectors to unite and devote new resources to support the rebuilding of infrastructure, the provision of health and social services, the restoration of care delivery systems, and other critical recovery needs. In some cases, billions of dollars from public, private and charitable sources are invested to help communities recover. National rhetoric often characterizes these efforts as a “return to normal.” But for many American communities, pre-disaster conditions are far from optimal. Large segments of the U.S. population suffer from preventable health problems, experience inequitable access to services, and rely on overburdened health systems. A return to pre-event conditions in such cases may be short-sighted given the high costs – both economic and social – of poor health. Instead, it is important to understand that the disaster recovery process offers a series of unique and valuable opportunities to improve on the status quo. Capitalizing on these opportunities can advance the long-term health, resilience, and sustainability of communities – thereby better preparing them for future challenges.”

 

4.14.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

Tampering with tried-and-true methods risks consequences that are anything but predictable and desirable, yet only through such chancy behavior can we ever fundamentally advance the human condition.

Quote of the Day
To publish Eduardo Galeano is to publish the enemy: the enemy of lies, indifference, above all of forgetfulness.  Thanks to him, our crimes will be remembered.  His tenderness is devastating, his truthfulness furious.”  John Berger about the magnificent Uruguayan, Presente!  
This Day in History
Giovanni Paolo Panini (Italian, Piacenza 1691–1765 Rome) - Ancient Rome
Giovanni Paolo Panini (Italian, Piacenza 1691–1765 Rome) – Ancient Rome

Two thousand fifty-eight years ago, more or less to the day, Mark Antony defeated the forces of one of Caesar’s assassins and lost out to the other, as the empire followed its imperial pathway toward carnage and chaos; a century and thirteen years later, in 70, current era, the son of Emperor Vespasian led four legions to surround Jerusalem in the ongoing struggles of that place that continue to this day; just four years short of nine centuries thereafter, in 966, a Polish ruler first converted to Christianity from his pagan beliefs and laid the foundations for a modern Polish state; one hundred sixty years henceforth, in 1126, a baby boy entered the world in the usual fashion on the Iberian Peninsula on his way to a life as the still legendary Spanish thinker and writer, Averroes; eight hundred ten years back, Crusaders battled in the Bulgarian Balkans at the Battle of Adrianople; just shy of nine decades hence, in 1294, on the other side of the world, Kublai Khan’s grandson Temur rose to the imperial throne of China; three hundred ninety-six years prior to the present pass, a baby boy was born who would mature as the renowned mathematical thinker and natural philosopher, Christiian Huygens; seventy years later, in

"BattleOfHoms1299" by unknown - BNF Nouvelle acquisition française 886, fol. 31v[1].
“BattleOfHoms1299” by unknown – BNF Nouvelle acquisition française 886, fol. 31v[1].
1699 on the other side of the planet, adherents of a Brotherhood of Warrior Saints constituted themselves for the first time as representatives of Sikh religion and culture; exactly three centuries before the here and now, in South Carolina, colonial English began the war that overturned Yamasee Native American culture in the Southern piedmont and Appalachian foothills; six decades henceforth, in 1775 in Philadelphia, two Benjamins—Rush and Franklin—constituted the first American society to abolish chattel slavery; just over four decades beyond that, in 1816, the killing of a slave who led a rebellion in British Barbados leads to his martyrdom as the island nation’s first heroic figure; a dozen years subsequently, back stateside in 1828,Noah Webster published the first edition of his eponymous Dictionary; a century and a half before the here-and-now, reactionary defenders of slavery cut down Abraham Lincoln, the nation’s first ‘corporate’ President; almost but not quite a quarter century thereafter, in 1889, across the Atlantic the baby boy cried out for the first time who would grow up as establishment historical voice, Arnold Toynbee; just three hundred sixty-five days beyond that, in 1890, across the Atlantic in Washington, the predecessor to a century-long corruption of democracy started with the U.S. imperial Pan-American Union, which now has the title Organization of American States and has even shown a little gumption in regard to toeing Washington’s line; four years later, up the East Coast in New York in 1894, the first commercial moving picture gallery opened its doors; a dozen years beyond that conjunction, in 1906, a revival took place in Los Angeles at which the foundation of Pentecostalism first formed; three years still farther down the road, in 1909, across the Atlantic and along the Mediterranean, Ottoman fighting forces slaughtered as many as 20,000 or so Armenians in the Cilicia region of Southeastern Turkey; another three years later, in 1912, the unsinkable Titanic sank in the icy North Atlantic after an iceberg ripped its hull; eighty-five years ago, the prolific and renowned Russian avant-garde and Soviet writer and producer and performer Vladmir Mayakovsky breathed his last; a year subsequently, in 1931, on the other side of Europe a popularly constituted Spanish Cortes overthrew the King, leading to the founding of the Republic and civil war against fascists; a leap year more proximate to the present, in 1932, the baby girl came along who would mature as the songwriter and iconic Country Music singer, Loretta Lynn; two more years along the path to the current juncture, in 1934, a male infant took his initial breath on the path to a life as Marxist thinker and literary maven, Frederic Jameson; another two years hence, in 1936, a baby male was born who would go on to become a different sort of working class hero, a police officer named Frank Serpico who struggled against New York’s official corruption and nearly died for his troubles; three years beyond that moment in time, in 1939, John Steinbeck first released his iconic tale of social struggle, The Grapes of Wrathsixty-one years back, a male child came along who would become the acclaimed science-fiction interlocutor, Bruce Sterling; two years later, in 1956, the first demonstration of videotape technology occurred in Chicago; eight years afterward exactly, in 1964, beloved environmental thinker and writer Rachel Carson breathed no more; two decades and two years closer yet to now, in 1986, Ronald Reagan order an erstwhile ‘retaliatory’ bombing of Libya that killed scores, and brilliant feminist theorist, Simone de Beauvoir, died; thirteen years before today, Hugo Chavez returned to power after a U.S. orchestrated officers’ coup fell apart in Venezuela; a year further along the path to today, in 2003, the human genome project announced a nearly complete sequencing of Homo Sapiens DNA. From Wikipedia Day in History

book hor2

SEARCH OF THE DAY
organizing OR grassroots strategy weakness OR insufficient OR inadquate "united states" especially = 66,100,000 Results.

book hor

TOP OF THE FOLD

EMBRACING CONTROVERSY, KEEPING A QUIET SMILE 

http://www.theguardian.com/         An obituary for Nobel Laureate Gunther Grass, who died yesterday, one of thousands of accounts about the German’s work and life, this one from The Guardian, which also contextualized the great novelist’s last interview, in El Pais from less than a month ago, in which the author warned of ‘sleepwalking’ into World War Three as imperial imprimatur in Ukraine and the Middle East conflicts with peaceful resolution, warnings of carnage from one whose participation in the German SS formed the deepest controversy of a life always at the border of literary contrariety: “He was always controversial, and sometimes bitterly attacked by critics at home for discussing German victimhood as well as German guilt.  Outside his country he was, inevitably, called Germany’s postwar conscience, a label he shared with the older writer Heinrich Böll.  In 1999, much later than expected, he won the Nobel prize for literature.  The Scandinavian judges praised his ‘creative irreverence’ and ‘cheerful destructiveness.’
           Seven years later, he stunned critics as well as admirers by admitting in the autobiographical Peeling the Onion that at the age of 17 he had been drafted into the notorious Waffen-SS in the last few months of the second world war.  Some claimed that he had revealed his long-held secret for cynical reasons to boost book sales, or that he had suppressed it for so long to avoid jeopardising his chances of winning the Nobel.  Christopher Hitchens denounced Grass as ‘something of a bigmouth and a fraud, and also something of a hypocrite.’  The former Polish president and Solidarity leader Lech Wałęsa said he was glad he had never met Grass, and urged him to give up his honorary citizenship of Gdańsk, the town where he was born and whose Nazi-era troubles were portrayed in The Tin Drum.  Wałęsa later retracted his remarks.
            Grass’s adolescence of unthinking patriotism was well known before Peeling the Onion. His father, Wilhelm, was German, and his mother, Helene (nee Knoff) was Polish, and they ran a grocer’s shop in Gdańsk (then the interwar free city of Danzig).  Günter joined the Hitler Youth: his political awakening came later, when, after the war, he worked in potash mines and as a stonemason’s apprentice, rubbing shoulders with ex-Nazis and ex-communists.  He decided skepticism and moderation were better than ideological extremes, a position he maintained throughout his life.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

The Relentless Award – The Relentless Award, established in honor of Philip Seymour Hoffman and his pursuit of truth in the theater, is the largest annual cash prize in American theater awarded to a playwright in recognition of a new play. Submissions will be accepted up until midnight of July 10, 2015. The winner and three finalists will be announced on October 2, 2015.

 

Brimstone Award for Applied Storytelling – Taking its name from brimstone, the elusive element medieval chemists believed would transform base metals into gold, this award focuses on the transformational properties of storytelling, and aims to increase understanding of the ways storytelling can promote change in individuals and communities.

BuzzFeed Emerging Writers Fellowship – With the mission of diversifying the broader media landscape by investing in the next generation of necessary voices, BuzzFeed’s Emerging Writers Fellowship is designed to give writers of great promise the support, mentorship, and experience necessary to take a transformative step forward in their careers. During the four-month program, the writers in this fellowship will benefit from career mentorship and editorial guidance while also receiving financial support. The learning process must be financially viable for emerging writers if it is intended to open the gates to writers traditionally locked out of opportunities in media.

The Paris Review – All submissions must be in English and previously unpublished. Translations are acceptable and should be accompanied by a copy of the original text. Simultaneous submissions are also acceptable as long as we are notified immediately if the manuscript is accepted for publication elsewhere. We strongly suggest to all who submit that they read the most recent issues of The Paris Review to acquaint themselves with material the magazine has published. Subscriptions are available here.

 

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Usadistributions.llc (Norcross GA) is currently looking for a talented Copywriter to join our in-house marketing team. This person will be responsible for writing consumer-focused copy through online and print. Familiarity with search engine optimization writing is a plus. This full-time or part time position is based in our Norcross, GA office.

Mondo Robot – Based in Boulder, Colorado, Mondo Robot is a multidisciplinary team of digital artisans that bring together passion, collaboration, and creativity to create high-concept digital solutions that are innovative, engaging, and results-driven. As our Copywriter, you have a passion for writing and keen understanding of the specific demands of digital media.

Graphic Designer & Copywriter Austin TX – We’re a fast-growing, Austin-based CPG company founded by a woman determined to save her dog after she nearly died from pesticide poisoning due to flea & tick “spot drops.” Just five years later, what our founder developed to save her dog is protecting pets, families and property around the world from fleas, ticks, mosquitoes and other pests – without toxic pesticides. Millions of pets still get monthly pesticide drops, and we’re on a mission to show the world that you don’t have to poison to protect. Join us!

Position Summary Miami FL The ideal candidate for Direct Marketing Copywriter will have solid direct response copywriting experience in conferences and other events.
The position will work with the product marketing managers on creative solutions to drive attendees to live and online events including email campaigns, flyers, brochures sales materials, website updates and ads. The position will also assist with customer service communications and sales materials and web site updates

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

book hor3Role of Libraries in Community

An American Library Association posting that discusses a report that places the true place of American libraries in America: “According to The State of America’s Libraries Report released today by the American Library Association (ALA), academic, public and school libraries are experiencing a shift in how they are perceived by their communities and society. No longer just places for books, libraries of all types are viewed as anchors, centers for academic life and research and cherished spaces.  “

A Literary Collection

A project from the University of Pittsburgh that brings wonderful offerings from around the web: “Longform.org recommends new and classic non-fiction from around the web.

Article suggestions, including writers and magazines submitting their own work, are encouraged. Longform considers pieces over 2,000 words that are freely available online.

Longform was founded in 2010. Longform Fiction was added in December 2012. Additional sections to come.

 

Longform Provides Audience

A Medium article that discusses the benefits of having a story placed on longform, and how the internet can help break a story: “This morning, a Latterly story was picked by Longform.org.

It’s a small thing, I know. It’s not like we won a prize or something. Still, for me, it’s extremely validating. Thousands of readers count on Longform to tell them which magazine articles are worth their time. A lot of their stuff comes from publications such as GQ, Esquire and The New York Times Magazine. Now on Longform’s website, our story, “Life, Death and Chemicals,” and our publication, Latterly, is right below The Paris Review and right above The New Yorker.”

 

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

NYTReporting Tips to Improve Newsroom

A Poynter article that discusses tips for all who want to make their outreach as potent as possible:  “As always, if you work in a newsroom outside of New York City, Washington D.C., or San Francisco — and are working on something other people can learn from, please let me know. I’ve heard from journalists in smaller newsrooms all over the world and would love to feature your innovative work that helps reach new audiences or strengthen relationships with existing ones.

In no particular order, here are 12 things you can do in your own newsroom that will immediately have an impact on your reporting and your reach.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

 

Marcelo Graciolli flickr
Marcelo Graciolli flickr

Internet Neutrality Fought

A The Hill posting that discusses the fight of corporate media outlets to kill a free internet: “Major trade groups representing the telecommunications and wireless industries are rushing to file lawsuits to kill the new net neutrality rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission.

Three groups announced lawsuits within minutes of each other on Tuesday. AT&T unveiled a stand-alone suit later in the day, bringing the total number to five.  

CTIA-The Wireless Association, which represents most of the major wireless carriers, filed suit Tuesday. The National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) announced that it had also filed a separate appeal to block the rules just minutes later. “

RECENT HAPPENINGS

Atlanta Cheating Case

An Atlanta Journal Constitution article that discusses developmens in the Atlanta education case: “The 10 former Atlanta educators sentenced Tuesday for their roles in a test-cheating scandal were out of the Fulton County Jail by 9:10 p.m.

They either met the requirements set by Judge Jerry Baxter or posted bonds that will leave them free while their cases are appealed.

Only one spoke as he left the jail, Donald Bullock, a former testing coordinator who admitted to his crimes in court and got off with six months of weekends in jail, five years of probation, 1,500 hours of community service and a $5,000 fine.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Attention Free Navigation

An MIT Technology Review article that views ways that technology is helping with navigation: “Sure, you can get directions by looking at a map on your phone or listening to turn-by-turn navigation. But what if you could just walk from point A to point B in a new place without having to look at a device or even think about whether you’re on the right course?

A group of researchers from three German universities is working on just that. In a study, they electrically stimulated a leg muscle to nudge subjects to turn left or right along twisty routes in a park. The work, which researchers refer to as “human cruise control,” will be presented next week in a paper at the CHI 2015 human-computer interaction conference in Seoul, South Korea.”

4.13.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

As a system for managing social needs and aspirations, private property is at once no easier to resist than is candy to a child and no more rational for furthering the human condition than is lionizing predation when one is oneself as much prey as predator.

Quote of the Day
“The immediate motive for writing was supplied by the outbreak of the First World War and the effect which its acclamation by the social-democratic parties had upon the European left.  My own deeply personal attitude was one of vehement, global and, especially at the beginning, scarcely articulate rejection of the war and especially of enthusiasm for the war.  I recall a conversation with Frau Marianne Weber in the late autumn of 1914.  She wanted to challenge my attitude by telling me of individual, concrete acts of heroism.  My only reply was: ‘The better the worse!’  When I tried at this time to put my emotional attitude into conscious terms, I arrived at more or less the following formulation: the Central Powers would probably defeat Russia; this might lead to the downfall of Tsarism; I had no objection to that.  There was also some probability that the West would defeat Germany; if this led to the downfall of the Hohenzollerns and the Hapsburgs, I was once again in favour.  But then the question arose: who was to save us from Western civilisation? (The prospect of final victory by the Germany of that time was to me nightmarish.)
          Such was the mood in which the first draft of The Theory of the Novel was written.  At first it was meant to take the form of a series of dialogues: a group of young people withdraw from the war psychosis of their environment, just as the story-tellers of the Decameron had withdrawn from the plague; they try to understand themselves and one another by means of conversations which gradually lead to the problems discussed in the book — the outlook on a Dostoevskian world.  On closer consideration I dropped this plan and wrote the book as it stands today.   Thus it was written in a mood of permanent despair over the state of the world.  It was not until 1917 that I found an answer to the problems which, until then, had seemed to me insoluble.”  Georg Lukacs: Preface to his Theory of the Novel
This Day in History

402px-Thomas_Jefferson_by_Rembrandt_Peale,_1800Today in the United States is a celebration of the birth of President, slaveholder, and true-genius ‘founding father,’ Thomas Jefferson; in Constantinople eight hundred eleven years ago, members of the Fourth Crusade overthrew and temporarily ended the Byzantine Empire; four hundred seventeen years prior to the present pass, Henry IV of France issued the Edict of Nantes, which instituted a form of freedom of religion of the Huguenots; fifteen years subsequently, in 1613, the English leader in Virginia orchestrated the capture of Powhatan’s daughter Pocahontas in order to gain leverage for the release of British prisoners;two hundred seventy three years back, the epic Messiah of George Frideric Handel premiered in Dublin; a hundred sixty six years before the here and now, Hungary participated in a certain sort of European revolution and became a republic; a dozen years after that, in 1861, the Union garrison at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, surrendered under threat of continued Confederate bombardment; five years later, in 1866, a male baby came alomng who would become criminal mastermind Butch Cassidy; one hundred forty five years ahead of today,  New York City founded the metropolitan Museum of Art; three years henceforth, in 1873, in Colfax, Louisiana, a slaughter of sixty African American men defined the contradictions and hypocrisy of the politics of so-called Reconstruction; twelve years later exactly, in 1885, a male child was born in Hungary who would grow into Marxist thinker and genius theoretician Georg Lucaks; one short year later, in 1886, the life of John Noyes came to an end, near the time that the complicated social structure which he founded as the Oneida Community also came to an end; a century and fourteen years prior to our present day, across the Atlantic in France, a male infant took a modernist breath on his fated path to become psychiatrist and deconstructionist Jacques Lacan; half a decade

"Poster for drama performance of "Waiting for Godot"
“Poster for drama performance of “Waiting for Godot”

beyond that point, in 1906, a baby boy both French and Irish gave an initial cry on his way to a life as Nobel Prize wining playwright and critic Samuel Beckett; three years later, in 1909,  on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, a baby girl started out on the road to life as acclaimed writer Eudora Welty;  ninety six years prior to today’s sunrise, the Republic of Korea first formed, and in a different expression of imperial hegemony, 2000 miles south and west, British troops murdered scores of unarmed civilians and injured thousands of others at Amritsar, and on the other side of the world, Eugene Debs went to U/S/ Federal prison for the crime of raising his voice against the barbarism of the conscription for World War One’s slaughterhouse, and, moreover, a female child came into the world in the usual way who would mature atheist instigator Madalyn Murray O’Hare; eighty four years before our current conjunction, in France, a little boy took his first breath who would become the Academy Award filmmaker Robert Enrico; a year later, three hundred sixty-six days as a result of the Leap Year, in 1932,in Chile, a baby boy uttered his first cry on his way to a brief life as justice-oriented economist Orlando Letelier; seventy seven years ago,the British man who had acculturated as an Ojibwe Indian in Great Lakes Canada, under the name Grey Owl, in which capacity he moved millions with his thinking on conservation and commodification, spent his final day among the beavers and birds; one year on the dot after that, in 1939, an Irish boy entered the world who would grow up as Nobel proze winning poet and author Seamus Heaney; another year further on, in 1940, across the English Channel, another baby boy entered the world who would go onto Nobel fame as writer and educator J. M. G. Le Clézio, ; around the world still another year closer to today, in 1941, Japan and the Soviet Union agreed to neutrality, despite the fact that the one’s mortal enemy and the other’s fast friend was Nazi Germany; seven hundred and thirty days henceforth, in 1943, the United States dedicated the Jefferson Memorial on his 200th birthday; a year later still, in 1944,  way down under, New Zealand established diplomatic relations with Communist Russia; four years down the road from that point, in 1948, scores of noncombatant Jewish medical personnel died at Hadassah at the hands of Arabic fighters; a year closer to now, in 1949, a male infant uttered his first cry en route to a life as journalist and critic Christopher Hitchens; sixty two years before this present point in

"Lsdblotter" by DEA Employee.  Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons -
“Lsdblotter” by DEA Employee. Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons –

time, Allen Dulles, Catholic neo-Nazi CIA director, inaugurated the MKULTRA CIA mind control operation, which included dosing clueless civilians with LSD; four years beyond that moment, in a 1957 counterpoint to Dulles’ perfidy, a baby girl entered the world who would mature as the journalist-for-progress Amy Goodman; half a century and half a decade in front of today, the United States launched Transit 1 B, the world’s first satellite navigation system; three years hence, in 1963,in Russia, a baby boy was born who became the chess genius and political leader Gary Kasparov; one leap year after that, in 1964, Sidney Poitier became the first African American to win the Academy Award for Best Actor; forty-three years back, the Universal Postal Union came to grips with reality in recognizing the People’s Republic of China as the only ‘Chinese Nation,’ replacing Taiwan’s place at that designated position; two years more proximate to today, in 1974, Western Union and Hughes Aircraft collaborated with the National Aeronautics & Space Administration in launching TelStar-I, the world’s first commercial geosynchronous communications orbiter; a decade hence precisely, in 1984, India extended its dominion over more territory in the disputed regions of Kashmir, furthering the so-called Line of Control over parts of the Sianchen Glacier; three years thereafter, in 1987, Portugal and the People’s Republic of China agreed to Macao’s return to Chinese control twelve years down the road, in 1999; six years beyond the original agreement, in 1993, the historian and critic and thinker Wallace Stegner died; nine years ahead of this juncture, the complex and brilliant British writer, Muriel Spark, breathed her last; three hundred sixty-five days prior to now, the investigator and thinker Michael Ruppert killed himself. From Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
propaganda ubiquity OR omnipresence OR ubiquitous OR omnipresent mediation inculcation purpose OR objective OR distraction OR "diversionary tactic" "political economy" OR explication OR marxist = 19,800 Hits.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

WELL-DESERVED LIONIZATION

http://www.theguardian.com          In the context of Eduardo Galleano’s death yesterday, a Guardian profile from a couple of years back that supplements the many  obituraries of this legendary and brilliant thinker and writer, a revolutionary voice against murder and oppression and the systematic predations of property and capital against humanity, especially against any manifestation of empowerment that might threaten these systems: “And so he flits from past to present and back again, making connections with a wry and scathing wit.  His desire, he says, is to refurbish what he calls the ‘human rainbow. It is much more beautiful than the rainbow in the sky,’ he insists.  ‘But our militarism, machismo, racism all blinds us to it.  There are so many ways of becoming blind.  We are blind to small things and small people.’

       And the most likely route to becoming blind, he believes, is not losing our sight but our memory.  ‘My great fear is that we are all suffering from amnesia.  I wrote to recover the memory of the human rainbow, which is in danger of being mutilated.’

        By way of example he cites Robert Carter III – of whom I had not heard – who was the only one of the US’s founding fathers to free his slaves.  ‘For having committed this unforgivable sin he was condemned to historical oblivion.’

        Who, I ask, is responsible for this forgetfulness?  ‘It’s not a person,’ he explains.  ‘It’s a system of power that is always deciding in the name of humanity who deserves to be remembered and who deserves to be forgotten … We are much more than we are told.  We are much more beautiful.'”

 

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

Maria W. Faust Sonnet Contest This year’s Contest, our eighth, again celebrates the memory of Maria W. Faust, a lover of poetry and a passionate supporter of the Great River Shakespeare Festival. Cash prizes, totaling $2,000, will be awarded in a number of categories. Sonnets may be written in Shakespearean, Petrarchan, Spenserian or Non-traditional form. Only previously unpublished sonnets are eligible. There is no entry fee and each entrant may submit one to three sonnets, maximum, with sonnets to be received no later than June 1st.

Chautauqua Editors Prize –  Beginning in 2014, CHAUTAUQUA will award Editors Prizes: $500, $250, and $100 for each issue. Awards will recognize the writing we feel best captures both the issue’s theme and the spirit of Chautauqua Institution. The first place winner will automatically be nominated for the Pushcart Prize. To be eligible, writers must submit using our online submission process—and all online submissions, regardless of genre, are contenders. See our submission guidelines for more information

Sellers Poetry Contest – Submitted entries must be unpublished. Simultaneous entries are accepted, but please email us at reecesociety@gmail.com immediately if your poem is accepted elsewhere. Manuscripts should be typed in a “plain” 12 point font (i.e. Times, Arial).  Photocopies are accepted.  Entries will not be returned, so do not send your only copy.

The 2015 SELTI Short Story Contest featuring the Huntsville area will use the Morrison-SELTI Tourism Literature Grading Rubric as a guide for writers and judges. This unique rubric was designed by Renee Morrison from Jacksonville State University while she was working as a judge for the Lookout Alabama SELTI Writing Contest in 2013. This rubric is the first academic standard for tourism fiction as a genre style and can be adapted as a guide for students, teachers, writers, and tourism organizations everywhere. Please review the rubric below when composing stories for the Huntsville SELTI Writing Contest. Also, please review the links to other SELTI tourism short stories for examples on how different attractions can be promoted through various creative angles, from scary to funny to fantasy

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Hamilton County Suburbs Reporter – Cincinnati.com and The Enquirer are searching for a Reporter to join our newsroom.  This is a one year, full-time paid internship.

The Lafayette Journal & Courier (IN), an award-winning news organization in northwest Indiana, seeks a dynamic, digital-first reporter to join our team to cover social welfare and policy issues and produce compelling stories that summon readers to action.

 

Mid-Level Copywriter – Agency (Denver)

A Denver-based agency is looking for a mid-level copywriter to join their team on a freelance to possible full-time basis.

 

Technical Writer (Ogden UT)

Your Employment Solutions, a leader in the Utah staffing industry, has been helping people find good jobs in Utah since 1995. We currently have an excellent opportunity for a Technical Writer with one of our important clients. compensation: $13.00 to $16.00 hourly DOE

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

128px-Bathroom-gender-signInequality in Earning

An Economic Policy Institute article that discusses the existing pay inequity between men and women: “April 14 is Equal Pay Day, a perfect opportunity to reflect upon the fact that women in our country still earn less than men. The figure below shows hourly wages in 2014 for men and women across the wage distribution. At every decile, men out-earn women. At the median, women’s hourly wages are only 83 percent of men’s hourly wages.”

Optimal Learning Conditions

A Chronicle of Higher Education posting that discusses the best practices of teaching and learning in a context that seeks to make education work:  “Last month I wrote about the attributes of the very best teachers, with the goal of identifying for young faculty members, in particular, the qualities they ought to emulate and cultivate. Several readers complained that my focus was too much on the teacher and not enough on students.

Fair enough. This month I’ll try to answer two questions: What do students need in order to learn? And how can we as teachers provide those things?”

diego rivera 1Workers Owning Means of Production

A Capital and Main article discussing workers who have purchased or acquired the company they work for: “According to the United States Federation of Worker Cooperatives, there are only 30 or so worker-owned businesses in California. While the number is small, other states and cities are embracing the trend. There are good reasons why Los Angeles city officials should encourage the worker-owned movement here as well.

Despite its socialistic sounding discourse, the worker-ownership movement is not directed by employees determined to “expropriate the expropriators.” Rather, they are enthusiastic about taking on the advantages and burdens of ownership themselves.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Legendary Post War Writer Dies

A New York Times commemoration of the life of a famous post war writer who late in life revealed sordid facts about his own war involvement: Günter Grass, the German novelist, social critic and Nobel Prize winner whom many called his country’s moral conscience but who stunned Europe when he revealed in 2006 that he had been a member of the Waffen-SS during World War II, died on Monday in the northern German city of Lübeck, which had been his home for decades. He was 87.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

4963146822_a2aa7e3a05_mCelebrity Worship and Fetish

A thoughtful and smart Chronicle of Higher Education article that dissects the pathetic hold that celebrity culture, present throughout humanity though becoming more excessive in current times, has on our culture, and what this can signify: “Is it a coincidence that countries that fare relatively poorly with respect to social mobility, happiness, and education also embrace celebrity culture and a reach-for-the-stars mentality? Perhaps. It seems hard to deny that a convergence of socioeconomic (e.g., poor social mobility) and technological (e.g., social media) trends with psychological and social predispositions and biases has created the perfect conditions for celebrity culture to thrive.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

Police Reaction at Shooting

A Guardian article that contextualizes the general opinion of the police towards the recent unwarranted police shooting: “The police officer who killed Walter Scott in South Carolina laughed about the adrenaline rush he was feeling, in a conversation that offers a new insight into his mindset in the minutes after the shooting.

Patrolman Michael Slager made the remarks during a discussion with a senior officer after fatally shooting Scott in North Charleston on 5 April. A recording of their conversation was obtained by the Guardian.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

"Lspn comet halley" by NASA/W. Liller - NSSDC's Photo Gallery (NASA)
“Lspn comet halley” by NASA/W. Liller – NSSDC’s Photo Gallery (NASA)

A Cosmic Moment

A Yes Magazine brief that discusses the cosmic nature of our lives, within the overwhelming larger entirety that surrounds us:  “In this short film, Michelle Thaller, a NASA astronomer and assistant director for science communication at the Goddard Space Flight Center, explains the role stars have played in the creation of the earth’s elements throughout time.

“So what is human existence? How can you actually sum it up? It turns out it’s actually pretty simple,” Thaller says. “We are dead stars looking back up at the sky.””

4.10.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

window_0780An insidious consequence of imprecise, even meaningless, language—paeans to leftists and condemnations of racism come to mind—is that the results that such articulation aim to call forth are equally uncertain or without useful import, even as often as not amounting to a continuation of the very patterns of oppression or outrage that these vague cavils against injustice attack, when a more focused expression would more readily lead to actual progress instead of the purported advances so common these days, which add up to little more than window dressing and other superficial, supposed beneficence.

Quote of the Day
“When you have a conflict, that means that there are truths that have to be addressed on each side of the conflict.  And when you have a conflict, then it’s an educational process to try to resolve the conflict.  And to resolve that, you have to get people on both sides of the conflict involved so that they can dialogue. …(Those who are on one side)cannot let people drive wedges between us…because there is only one human race.”  Dolores Huerta 
This Day in History

Today in the United States is National Siblings Day; in Novara, five hundred fifteen years ago, Swiss forces captured Ludovico Sforza, who was active in fifteenth and sixteenth century Italian wars, and handed him over to the French; four hundred thirty-two years before the here-and-now, a baby boy kicked into the world on his way to becoming the famed Dutch legal thinker and philosopher, Hugo Grotius; twenty-three years later, in 1606, King James signed off on the formation of the Virginia Company of London to move forward British efforts to colonize North America; a century and four years after that, in 1710, the Statute of Anne took effect and formally and fully inaugurated printed content as property; twenty-six decades prior to the present moment, a baby boy was born who became Samuel Hahnemann, founder of homeopathy; a year less than two centuries back,  the U.S. government formed the controversial Second Bank of the United States; five years henceforth, in 1821, five thousand miles away in Constantinople, Ottoman authorities hung orthodox prelate Gregory V and threw his body in the Bosporus; one hundred sixty-eight years before today’s sunrise, a male child uttered its first cry in Hungary en route to a life as the U.S. publisher Joseph Pullitzer; a hundred and fifty one years before the present pass, testing the Monroe Doctrine, Hapsburg emperor Maximilian proclaimed himself France’s emperor of Mexico for a brief time; four years subsequently, in 1868, across the Atlantic and halfway through the Mediterranean, British and Indian forces crushed an Ethiopian army at Arogee in expanding British sway into the Horn of Africa; a dozen years hence back on the Western Hemisphere side of the Atlantic, in 1880, a baby girl gave its first cry on her way to a life as reformer and labor advocate Frances Perkins; seven years beyond that conjunction, in 1887, Pope Leo XIII agreed to the creation of the Catholic University of the United States; a hundred eleven years before this moment, British mystical thinker Aleister Crowley completed his final installment of The Book of the Lawhalf-a-decade closer to this point, in 1909, fellow aristocrat and writer Algernon Charles Swinburne breathed his last; just three hundred sixty-five days later, in 1910, over the Atlantic, a male infant entered the world who would become the renowned Marxist thinker and founder of the Monthly Review, Paul Sweezy; two years thereafter, in 1912, the Titanic embarked on its only voyage;seven years still more proximate to today, in 1919, a plot of wealthy Mexicans and foreign business interests resulted in the gunning down of Mexican popular leader and legend, Emiliano Zapata; six years afterward, in 1925, F. Scott Fitzgerald first published The Great Gatsbyanother half decade more proximate to today, in 1930, a baby girl drew her first breath on the other side of North America, on her way to maturation as union leader and activist Dolores Huerta; one year more, in 1931, lionized poet and artist Kahlil Gibran drew his final breath; three years still closer to now, in 1934, a baby boy was born who would grow up as noted journalist and documentarian David Halberstam; seventy-four years ago, a male child shouted out for the first time on his path to life as the gadfly and live wire writer Paul Theroux; a dozen years after that conjunction, in 1953, the first 3-D movie, “House of Wax,” came into the marketplace; a year subsequently, in 1954, the originator of motion pictures, and a producer and a director in his own right, Auguste Lumiere, spent his last day alive; another year nearer now, in 1955, fellow Frenchman, thinker and philosopher Pierre Teilhard de Chardin died; forty-eight years back, the voice of a baby boy first sounded out on his way to songs of justice and freedom under the name David Rovics; five years thereafter, in 1972, more than seventy nations signed the Biological Weapons Convention, the first attempt in International Law to eliminate germ warfare and related technologies of death; three years further down the road, in 1975, renowned photographer and documentarian Walker Evans drew his last breath. From Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"emiliano zapata" assassination "united states involvement" OR "united states interests" = 272,000 Citations.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

DRUG WAR SOCIAL REALITIES

http://www.rollingstone.com/      Simply a brilliant, and transparently honest, posting from Rolling Stone, in which the  investigative reporter acts as an interlocutor for a now imprisoned young, working class drug dealer who wants to tell the tale of what happened in his life, which in essence all occurs at the intersection of pharmaceutical company profits, a less-than-robustly prosecuted sector of contraband political economy, and the medical establishment’s proclivity to provide prescriptions: “‘I was born in 1988, at the end of the Reagan era,’ Dodd tells me via prison e-mail.  ‘Growing up, virtually everyone around me was selling drugs or doing them.  Family, friends, everybody was getting high or making money from it — or both.
‘I started smoking pot around 12,’ Dodd says.  ‘There was something about lighting a bowl and sucking in the smoke — the artificial sense of serenity.  In the sixth grade, I thought it would be fun to smoke up on the school bus.  I thought I was so cool pulling out my pipe — it never occurred to me that another student would rat me out.  That time, the school called the police.’
Taken to the Pasco County juvenile holding center outside Tampa, the 13-year-old Dodd was fingerprinted, and his mug shot was taken for the first time.  The police called his father, who came to collect him with a heavy sigh.  Dodd’s parents were divorced, and he knew his mother wouldn’t do much.  But Dodd’s father admonished his son to make better choices in life.
‘It was hard to take advice from my father seriously, given the mistakes he’d made in his own life,’ Dodd wrote.  ‘He was constantly getting caught nailing the waitresses at the restaurants he managed — he found three wives that way.     Between my father’s affinity for waitresses and my mother’s taste for cold beer, their marriage was always doomed.’  Growing up poor in hardscrabble towns outside Tampa — working-class neighborhoods of trailer parks, muscle cars and fast-food joints — Dodd ran with a gang of older, tougher kids.
With his parents working long hours, Dodd was left to fend for himself and dealt weed in high school to earn pocket money.  He also worked nights as a fry cook at joints like Mike’s Dockside and Hooters.  Which was how his drug-slinging venture really began — to be precise, on the evening of February 10th, 2006.  That night, Dodd finished a shift at his crappy seven-bucks-an-hour job.  Exhausted by school, wrestling practice, homework and then work, he got in his beater Honda Prelude and lit a blunt.  As he drove home, Dodd forgot to turn on his headlights and was pulled over by a cop, who searched the car and found a bag with half an ounce of marijuana. …
            (On probation and unable to smoke marijuana), Like millions of American teenagers, Dodd had discovered the pleasures of an opioid developed in Germany in 1916 that had been turned into a multibillion-dollar industry in the United States as pharmaceutical companies marketed a synthetic drug designed to treat chronic and severe pain — but that could be repurposed into a recreational high by crushing the pill to disable the time-release mechanism.  Hillbilly heroin, as it was called, was pioneered in poor white communities in the Appalachian Mountains in the mid-Nineties.  By the middle of the 2000s, oxycodone was a national health crisis, as thousands of people died of overdoses and millions became severely addicted.”
JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

‘Stories of Music’ Anthology Needs Prose and Poetry – Pays $200 per story/poem
A new independent publisher, Timbre Press, is seeking submissions about the incredible ways in which music has impacted people’s lives. As a multimedia publication, Stories of Music will include a variety of genres and mediums: creative nonfiction, poetry, photography, art, audio recordings, and video.


Six Hens, a new publication debuting June 2015, will feature true stories by women about the moments that define and redefine. Writers bring us to the places and events that changed what they believe in, changed how they see their place in the world, and changed them. Through their narration, they change us.

Cricket Media is seeking submissions for the April 2016 issue of FACES magazine, a kid’s publication on specific world cultures. The theme for this issue is “The Dominican Republic”—articles that let young readers (ages 9-14) journey this nation on the island of Hispaniola, part of the Caribbean region. Writers can write about how The Dominican Republic’s surroundings influence local culture and how other young Dominican live.

Love Hurts Anthology Seeking Speculative Fiction Romance Stories Independent fiction publisher Meerkat Press is seeking submissions for Love Hurts, a planned anthology of short stories that revolve around broken love. The editor welcomes stories of cheats, scandals, love triangles, weird relationships, dating hazards, etc. … Deadline: 04/30/2015 Pay: up to $200/story


Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission. 

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Asheville area  – General Manager for small publishing company. Must have background in publishing and marketing. Must have BA or BS minimum. Oversee daily activities. compensation: $22.50/hr.

 

Business Plan Writer or Technical Writer (Dallas) The Business Plan Writer or Technical Writer will play an important role in analyzing, formulating and presenting a company for investment consideration. While the end goal deliverable will be a business plan, this role will call for careful and thoughtful identification of a Company’s value proposition, describing that value proposition in written prose, supporting that value proposition through graphs, chart and financial statements, identification of investment risks, analyzing industry trends and opportunities, summarizing business development, marketing and execution strategy and conducting competitive research. compensation: Between $28,000 and $35,000 per year

Editor Opportunities Denver CO – We are looking for high-energy and fun-loving grammarians to provide flawless editing and proofreading services to our ever-expanding client base. We receive a high volume of academic and business papers 24/7/365. compensation: $11.00 – $20.00 per hour

Lincoln NE – Photojournalist wanted – to gather and write articles, acquire photos and edit copy for a variety of products such as magazines, newsletters, television spots, web content and other projects. Travel required. Organizational skills imperative

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

Jon Sullivan - public domain
Jon Sullivan – public domain

Dignity of Fight for Livable Wage

An In These Times article that interviews the workers on the frontlines of the struggle for livable wages, and shares their struggles and triumphs: “Hunter, 53, is a leader nationally and in Chicago of the Fight for $15, an ambitious campaign that New York City fast food workers launched two-and-a-half years ago. But other cities picked up the call, then other occupations, from retail workers and childcare providers to adjunct professors. It has caught the imagination of the public as well and notched some notable victories, such as a $15 minimum wage in Seattle and Seatac in Washington state, as well as in San Francisco.

“We can’t wait. Jewel isn’t waiting. People’s Gas isn’t waiting,” he says, referencing a Chicago grocery chain and natural gas utility, respectively. “We need higher wages to support our families. Many people thought we were crazy two years ago when we walked off our jobs in New York and demanded $15 an hour. They don’t think we’re crazy now.””

Murderer Attending Event

A TeleSur brief that discusses the political aims of a summit organization who would invite known murderers and human rights abusers to attend: “According to Yoanislandia, quoting “friends in solidarity with Cuba,” the man who murdered Ernesto “Che” Guevara, Felix Rodriguez, arrived in Panama on Tuesday to attend the Summit of the Americas forums. Rodriguez is a Cuban and an ex-CIA agent. He is also known for having participated in the Bay of Pigs invasion. The CIA also sent him to Bolivia to kill revolutionary leader Guevara in 1967. He ordered that Guevara be “shot below the neck” so that it could be “proved” that he had been “killed in combat.” “

Mormon_row_barn_grand_teton_national_parkRaping the Landscape for Profits
An Al Jazeera report on the state of mining in Appalachia, and the general disruption of mountaintop removal that still is practiced in the area: “Locals have witnessed the death of their landscape as a precursor to the death in their own communities. “Near the once booming coal mining towns of Matoaka and Montcalm in Mercer County, West Virginia, the once steep mountainside covered in trees and local fauna is now barren and unrecognizable,” Wendy Johnson, a farmer and librarian who grew up in the area, said, describing the long-term repercussions of a nearby MTR operation. “A few homes sit across the road from the mine, which reaches all the way down to the roadside now, faced with massive amounts of run-off. A once lush mountainside is now a barren and muddy landscape.”How much more wreckage will it take for a top-level Obama official to even visit an MTR operation — a request by affected residents that in six years has never been answered?”

 

Bolivia Elections

A Truth Out analysis of the voting landscape in Bolivia, where a populist and popular leader seeks reelection under circumstances that differ from the first: “While these symbolic gestures help to reaffirm the indigenous and insurgent roots of Morales’s political project, much about Bolivia and the MAS has profoundly changed since Morales first came to power. Back in 2005, Morales was elected (with 54% of the vote) by an alliance of indigenous, campesino, and other popular movements, on a radical platform to redistribute land, reassert state control over the country’s natural resources, and refound Bolivia as a plurinational state. He was fiercely opposed by conservative elites in the eastern lowlands departments (the “media luna” or half-moon), whose secessionist threats subsequently brought the country to the brink of civil war.

By contrast, in last October’s election Morales carried 8 of Bolivia’s 9 departments, including 3 of 4 in the eastern lowlands. He won with 61% of the vote, close to 40 points ahead of his nearest opponent (representing a badly fractured opposition). On Morales’s coattails, the MAS gained a 2/3 majority in both legislative chambers, assuring the “super-majority” needed for some laws and for potential constitutional changes.”

Austerity March

A Roger Annis blog post about more solidarity demonstrations against austerity: “The CSN union federation has called upon its members to join the march in Montreal. March organizers have declined to provide police with notice of the march route, as required by Montreal municipal bylaw P-6. Since student strikes began on Monday, March 23 (kicked off by a mass march in Montreal on March 21), municipal bylaws and the Criminal Code have been used by police in Montreal and Quebec City to violently suppress street marches and other acts of student protest. Many students have been brutalized by police and hundreds have been arrested.”

Userbox-MG-pro-choicePreserving Women’s Rights

A Rolling Stone article that discusses the wrongheaded and harmful consequences and implications of abortion-restricting legislation: “The past four years have been nothing short of devastating for abortion rights in the United States. From 2011 to 2015, 231 abortion restrictions were enacted across the country, leaving the majority of American women in states that are outright hostile to reproductive healthcare. Thirteen states have enacted bans on abortion at or before 20 weeks, some without exceptions for rape, incest or the health of the pregnant person. In fact, states like Alabama and North Dakota have passed bans at 12 and six weeks, respectively – a point at which many don’t even know they’re pregnant. Earlier this year, House Republicans proposed (then sheepishly shelved) a federal ban on abortion at 20 weeks. These laws are all designed for one purpose: to force today’s sharply divided Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

book sq6Language Changes and Distress

A Guardian post that discusses linguistic pet peeves in the context of language as an ever-evolving entity, with some glaring examples: “While editing Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage, the book that many writers and editors turn to as the correct usage bible, I had de Saussure’s maxim constantly in mind. If I pull my linguist’s hat firmly down over my ears, it enables me to observe language change objectively. But if I forget that headgear, or, as some might allege, put on my tinfoil hat, certain things, if they do not exactly make my blood boil, heat it to a moderate simmer. Here, in no particular order, are a few”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

 Mediating Content for Advertisers’ Sakes

An Adweek post that shows the fear and awe that editorial staff have for their advertisers, to the point where they are tempted to pull content that challenges the advertisers’ brand or product: “The stories were also reposted with the following statement: “This post was inappropriately deleted amid an ongoing conversation about how and when to publish personal opinion pieces on BuzzFeed. The deletion was in violation of our editorial standards and the post has been reinstated.”

Our original article begins below:

A BuzzFeed writer’s critical perspective on Dove’s newest viral ad campaign abruptly vanished from the site this week, sparking debate about whether editors were going easy on an advertiser. BuzzFeed’s editor, however, says the post was simply the kind of “hot take” that doesn’t fit with the site’s tone. “

RECENT HAPPENINGS

128px-Bathroom-gender-signReporting on Sexual Assaults

A College Media Matters article that discusses a media collaboration examining sexual assaults as epidemic in fraternities: “The combined long-form report by Collegian metro editor Erin McCarthy and Cavalier Daily news associate editor Anna Higgins is largely focused on a pair of high-profile recent scandals at the schools: the fallout from the Rolling Stone “A Rape on Campus” report and the PSU fraternity Kappa Delta Rho’s operation of “a private Facebook group containing photos of nude, unconscious women.”

Along with the editorial content, Daily Collegian visual editor Kelsie Netzer worked on numerous top-notch graphics and a digital timeline of both incidents. Daily Collegian digital editor Darian Somers also deserves kudos for a sleepless production night overseeing the piece’s online rollout.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Social Progress Measured

A Good article that discusses recent findings of basic human indexes of progress, and the ways that the U.S. measures up: “When it comes to the U.S., ranked 16th, the country under performs in areas of health and wellness, access to basic knowledge, and access to information and communications. Green says these findings indicate not that the U.S. doesn’t have high quality healthcare or internet infrastructure available, but that as a country it has failed to distribute these things evenly.

“Basically our findings are telling the American inequality story at a much more granular level, or in other words, where the inequality lies,” Green said. “All these failures are about the failure to provide services to everyone equally.””

4.09.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

 

Edward Hopper
Edward Hopper

Hopelessness would be so easy a shrug to indulge, what with the murderous predation and corrupt oppression that present themselves—with fully mediated monopolistic approval—every day as righteous protection of our ‘security’ and ‘welfare,’ yet persistence in pursuing justice and dogged documentation of mandated mayhem, with the faith that something might work out for human progress, must continue to be the default positions that people adopt, if only because giving in to despair, or any of the ancillary narratives of bullshit and nonsense that accompany futility, is ultimately so boring.

Quote of the Day
“If the American Negro is to have a culture of his own he will have to leave America to get it. …From what I have already seen of the workings of the Soviet Government, I can only say that anybody who lifts his hand against it ought to be shot!  It is the government’s duty to put down any opposition to this really free society with a firm hand, and I hope they will always do it, for I already regard myself at home here.  This is home to me.  I feel more kinship to the Russian people under their new society than I ever felt anywhere else.  It is obvious that there is no terror here, that all the masses of every race are contented and support their government.”  Paul Robeson
This Day in History

Eighteen hundred twenty-two years back, in the Balkans where so much of imperial mayhem continues to this day, Lucius Septimius Severus received his troops’ approval as emperor and subsequently marched on Rome to further extend the imperial prospect; one thousand five hundred forty years before the here-and-now, Emperor Asiliscus of Byzantium allied his bishops with the theory that Jesus was only divine and not also human, thus setting up a split among Christian churches that continues to this day; seven hundred and seventy-four years prior to this point, Mongol forces crushed Northern European opposition at the Battle of Liegnitz almost simultaneously as the main Mongol force confronted and defeated Europeans in Hungary; forty-seven years subsequently, in 1288, another Mongol invasion force faced decidedly different consequences in Vietnam, where local defenders brutalized the cavalry-based tactics of the invaders; exactly a century later on the opposite side of the world, in 1388, Swiss fighters triumphed over a vastly larger collection of Austrian troops; five hundred sixty-one years ago, a rare period of peace on the Italian Peninsula ensued following the Treaty of Lodi; a half-century and seven years after that, in 1511, Lady Margaret Beaufort oversaw the founding of St. John’s College at Cambridge University; four hundred sixty-two years prior to this exact conjunction, the bawdy monk, Francois Rabelais, breathed his last; thirty-two years henceforth, in 1585, Sir Walter Raleigh’s project to settle Roanoke Island, ill-fated in the end, departed England; just shy of a quarter century thereafter, in 1609, the Dutch Republic and Spain agreed to a treaty that permitted a dozen years of relative calm in the midst of the Eighty Years War; three hundred thirty-three years before today, explorer Robert La Salle came upon the Mississippi River mouth and claimed lands drained by Big Muddy for France;  three years less than two and a half centuries before this exact juncture, Sarah Fieldingone of history’s first aficionados of children’s literature and sister to the novelist Henry breathed her last; a hundred ninety four years ahead of today’s light, a baby boy came into France’s light and air en route to a life as the acclaimed author, Charles Baudelaire;one hundred fifty-five years back, French inventor Edouard Martinville created the first actual recording of a human voice, a graphic representation that only recently received its first hearingseven years after, in 1867, the U.S. Senate approved the purchase of Alaska by a single vote; a decade and a half hence, in 1882, across the Atlantic the great heart of the poet and artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti beat no more; one hundred seventeen years more proximate to the present, a baby boy was born back on the other side of the Atlantic, destined to grow into the magnificent singer, thinker, and athlete Paul Robeson; eleven years thereafter, in 1909, a divisive tariff act passed Congress that laid the basis for both the first corporate income tax and a huge split in the Republican Party; ninety-two years ahead of today, a male child was born who grew up as the little remembered but arguably critically important media scholar, Leonard Levy, who established that early publications in British America faced often fierce efforts to squelch critical reportage; three years hence, in 1926, another baby boy came along who became the renowned if arguably not as important thinker and publisher, Hugh Hefner; seventy-six years ago, world-renowned singer Marian Anderson, denied a venue to perform at the Daughters of the American Revolution Hall, sang instead to a giant audience at the Lincoln Memorial; three hundred sixty-six days hence, in 1940, across the Atlantic in Scandinavia, Germany invaded Norway and Denmark and collaborator Vidkun Quisling lent his name to synonymity with traitor; five years further beyond that, in 1945, again on the North American side of the ocean, the United States inaugurated the Atomic Energy Commission, as the likelihood of success became more certain in its weapons-of-mass-destruction program—the Manhattan Project; precisely two years hiroshima war explosion nuke nuclearcloser to this point, in 1947, the first ‘freedom rides’ took place as Whites and Blacks in the upper South rode together to promote a Supreme Court decision that mandated equality of conveyance in interstate travel; a year hence, in 1948, a thousand miles South in Colombia, the assassination of leader Jorge Gaitan initiated a ten year period of carnage, la violenciafour years later, in 1952, the temporary victory of the Bolivian National Revolution allowed for popular reforms such as nationalization of mines and recognition of workers’ organizations; five years still closer to this moment in time, in 1957, the Suez Canal reopened after its closing as a result of damage from the Suez War; forty-six years back, the so-called Chicago Eight defendants pled not guilty to conspiring to cause riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention; around the worldseven years later, in 1975, U.S.-backed Korean dictator Park signed off on the summary execution of eight socialists for the crime of having democratic beliefs in the context of massive protests against the Korean government; just a year afterward, in 1976, legendary folksinger Phil Ochs killed himself; twenty-three years before today, a U.S. appellate court affirmed the conviction of CIA-supported ‘strongman’ Manuel Noriega for drug trafficking and conspiracy;four years more proximate to the present, in 1996, novelist and thriller yarnspinner Richard Condon died; four years ago to the day, screenwriter and filmmaker Sydney Lumet breathed his last; two years closer to now, in 2013,investigative reporter McLandish Phillips died. From Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
discrimination OR bigotry history hypocrisy "social polarity" OR "social contradiction" OR "social impossibility" = 991 Results.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

WITH NUKES, THE UNKNOWN CAN REALLY HURT

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/     A report from Japan Times about a never-released governmental report that concluded that an attack on a nuclear reactor could cause tens-of-thousands of deaths in the immediate aftermath, as well as resulting in developments similar to some things that transpired during the Fukushima accident, the upshot of all of which is further criticism of the nuclear industry and its backers in the government from Japanese activists and citizens: “According to Yasushi Noguchi, head of the ministry’s arms control and disarmament division, the ministry asked the Japan Institute of International Affairs, an affiliate of the ministry, to draw up the report after Israel staged an airstrike and destroyed a reactor under construction in Iraq in 1981.
Noguchi said the report concluded that up to 18,000 people would die in the worst-case scenario if the primary containment vessel of a 1 million kilowatt-class reactor in Japan was severely damaged and local residents did not evacuate immediately.
In another scenario, the report also warned that if all power supplies were cut and critical cooling functions lost, fuel rods would melt down.  The hydrogen generated from metals used for fuel assembly cladding could then potentially cause an explosion.
This type of hydrogen explosion actually happened and aggravated the meltdown crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 power plant after the massive tsunami of March 11, 2011, knocked out the power supply, killing the critical cooling operation. …
The Tokyo Shimbun alleged the Foreign Ministry did not publish the report because it feared it would fan anti-nuclear sentiment while the government was trying to build more nuclear power plants in the 1980s.”
JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

A Public Space is accepting submissions of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.

The Alice Munro Festival of the Short Story is still accepting entries for theirShort Story Competition. The contest is open to Canadian residents and features up to $1500 in prizes.

Idyllwild Arts‘ Summer Program Writing Workshops offer writers at all levels aweek-long opportunity to deepen their understanding of story and language with authors who have long publishing records and extensive teaching experience.

Sixpenny is a digital and print magazine of illustrated short stories. They’re currently accepting short stories, graphic short stories, and illustration portfolios for their Issue 2.

The New Orleans Loving Festival is calling for short films and original artwork with themes concerning race, racism, and the multiracial experience for a juried group art exhibition at Press Street’s Antenna Gallery.

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Andrews and Murphy NC – The Cherokee Scout and Andrews Journal, weekly newspapers in the beautiful Smoky Mountains of western North Carolina, are looking for a staff writer with strong journalism skills and the initiative to independently find compelling stories about our communities.

McCook (NE) Gazette is seeking candidates for the position of Sports Editor 

The Free Press of Kinston (NC) is seeking an energetic general assignment reporter whose primary responsibilities will include covering city and county government. Ideal candidates will have experience at a daily newspaper or collegiate student newspaper, but recent graduates (and those set to graduate soon) are also encouraged to apply. A strong knowledge of AP style and new media is preferred

 The Bryan-College Station Eagle (TX) is looking for a driven reporter interested in dissecting the crime beat in an eight-county region of Central Texas. The position requires an organized person who takes initiative, is tenacious and has a passion for journalism in the digital age. We hope references tell us that the reporter has excellent source development skills and is at ease in most any setting.

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

University Protests Capitalism

A Truth Out article that analyses the implication of a protest in Europe: “The Maagdenhuis occupation, a protest against the financialization of higher education and against the concentration of decision-making power at the university, disrupted the everyday flow of doing, changing the normal organization of human sense experience on campus. By taking a building and reorganizing human activity inside, with emphasis on dialogue, deliberation and shared decision-making, occupiers created new aesthetic conditions necessary for a new politics, as philosopher Jacques Rancière, who recently visited the Maagdenhuis to show solidarity with UvA students, suggests.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Journalism Classes

A Poynter announcement of classes all scrappy writers might take: “Maybe it was the budget that has shrunk so small it puts Cinderella’s waist to shame. Maybe it is the stampede of editors running over your neat narrative. Maybe it’s the endless beeping of the newsroom’s broken fire alarm. Something made you fall out of love with journalism, the profession you must have loved at one time. NewsU teaches skills and processes, but it can also provide inspiration. No matter what made you fall out of love with journalism, here are some courses that will make you want to buy journalism flowers and take it out to dinner again.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Journalism Platform

A journalistic platform that allows scrappy writers to compose stellar text in a lovely platform: “We don’t just build storytelling software for you—we rely on it ourselves to create the award-winning Atavist Magazine. One blockbuster longform story per month, with the most elegant writing, engaging video, and innovative design on the web.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

"Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing" por W. Müller Wikimedia Commons
“Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing” por W. Müller Wikimedia Commons

Drug Tales

A fascinating report from Rolling Stones about drugs and empire-building:  “Prisoners pitch me their stories from time to time. But I’ve never before reported an article based on the manuscript of a tale written by a convicted drug dealer and a major mortgage fraud mastermind, both inmates in a federal facility in Florida. A while back, Doug Dodd and his prison writing partner, Matthew Cox, sent me a document titled “Oxy Rush: From High School Wrestlers to Oxycodone Kingpins,” asking if I might be interested in writing about the story. Dodd was serving 80 months for trafficking illegal prescription drugs and money laundering. Cox was doing 26 years for a massive fraud he’d committed by originating fake mortgages and stealing the proceeds. The hundred or so pages they’d written were printed in the form of prison-issue e-mails, with inmate numbers stamped at the top.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Affordability of Electric Cars

A Technology Review article that discusses the renewed affordability of a more renewable car: “Electric cars may seem like a niche product that only wealthy people can afford, but a new analysis suggests that they may be close to competing with or even beating gas cars on cost.

The true cost of lithium-ion batteries in electric cars is a secret closely held by manufacturers. And estimates of the cost vary widely, making it tough to determine just how much lower they must go before electric vehicles with long ranges can be affordable for most buyers. But a peer-reviewed study of more than 80 estimates reported between 2007 and 2014 determined that the costs of battery packs are “much lower” than widely assumed by energy-policy analysts.”

4.08.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

The art of sailing life’s seas—at one moment as wild as bedlam, the next as calm as toasty midnight slumber—in part consists of carrying the placidity and ease of the latter condition into the former environs and maintaining the fierce focus and watchful wariness that one brings to the yawing waves and crazy gales even as the surrounding water’s surface appears as smooth as glass.

Quote of the Day
“To be hopeful, to embrace one possibility after another–that is surely the basic instinct.  Baser even than hate, the thing with teeth, which can be stilled with a tone of voice or stunned by beauty.  If the whole world of the living has to turn on the single point of remaining alive, that pointed endurance is the poetry of hope.”  Barbara Kingsolver
This Day in History

256px-Spanish_Gypsy_Girls_NGM-v31-p267Today is International Day of the Roma, and, in Japan, Buddha’s birthday; as a consequence of the disintegration of the Western Roman Empire, thirteen hundred and eighty-three years ago, a Merovingian king, Charibert number two, and his son died at the hands of what were likely family assassins intent on forming more extensive and powerful kingdoms that included Aquitaine and Gascony; two hundred forty-four years thereafter, in 876, non-Persian Muslim rule in Bagdhad survived assault by the Saffarids at Dayr-al-‘Aqul; one thousand twenty-two years prior to this point in time, the prelate Walkelin dedicated a new Winchester Cathedral in Hampshire, England; extending their conquests Eastward as well as Westward, Mongol forces seven hundred eighty-three years ahead of the present moment invested their siege of Jin capital at Kaifeng; only a year shy of four decades henceforth, in 1271, the Sultan Baybars led the conquest of Christian Crusader castle, Krak of Chevaliers; two hundred seven years prior to the present pass, Baltimore obtained its own Archbishop, as the Catholic Church designated New York, Boston, and other cities as worthy of their own bishoprics; twelve years beyond that instant, in 1820, French naval snoopers uncovered the 192px-Venus_de_Milo_Louvre_Ma399_n2Venus de Milo on the Greek island of Melos and soon enough ‘purchased’ it for Paris; another dozen years more proximate to the present day, in 1832, U.S. infantry departed St. Louis en route to carnage against the Sauk, in what we now call Black Hawk’s War; one hundred fifty-six years before now, a baby boy came into the world in Austria who would rise to his life as philosopher and mathematical thinker Edmund Husserl; just a year less than a century and a half back, Prussia and Italy flexed national muscles in an alliance against continued Austrian hegemony in Central and Southern Europe; two decades beyond that conjunction, in 1886, William Gladstone introduced the first Irish Home Rule bill into Parliament; not quite a decade subsequently, in 1895, the U.S. Supreme Court disallowed an unapportioned income tax as an unconstitutional taking; in a prelude to the Triple Entente that governed World War One for England and France, those two nations one hundred eleven years before the here and now signed an Entente Cordialeseven years hence, in 1911, Dutch physicist Heike Onnes first proved the concept of superconductivity; seven hundred thirty-one days later, in 1913, the U.S. Seventeenth Amendment became law, requiring the popular election of Senators throughout the land; a half-decade beyond that point, in 1918, both Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks sought to demonstrate their patriotism by selling war bonds in the streets of New York City; ninety-one years before the sun rose today, the Turkish thinker and political reformer, Ataturk, succeeded in leading his country to abolish Sharia Law; five years later to the day, in 1929, five thousand miles Southeast, Subcontinent revolutionaries in Delhi threw bombs and passed our flyers so as to force British authorities to arrest them, and on the other side of the world, a Belgian baby entered life’s theater on his way to life as singer, actor, and writer, Jacques Brel; two short years later, in 1931, the Swedish poet and Nobel Laureate Erik Karlfeldt drew his ultimate breath; four years down the road from that juncture, in 1935, under the auspices of the Emergency Relief Appropriations Act, the Works Progress Administration came into377px-Forging_ahead_LCCN98518700 existence as an employer of dispossessed and otherwise underutilized citizens; another two years later, in 1937, a male child uttered its first cry on his way to life as investigative interlocutor, Seymour Hersh; seventy-two years ago, President Roosevelt instituted ‘war-effort’ rules that froze wages and prices and prohibited people from quitting and taking other jobs; three years afterward across the Atlantic, in 1946, France nationalized its electrical capacity completely; sixty-five years before this precise moment, India and Pakistan agreed to protocols that allowed the recovery of property and the return of refugees from upheavals that took place and threatened a situation of civil war in the aftermath of the British abdication to independent Hindu and Muslim states in India and Pakistan respectively; halfway round the globe, two years hence, in 1952, Harry Truman oversaw the seizure of U.S. steel production facilities in order to preclude a major strike; a year later and six thousand miles away in East Africa, in 1953, British colonial authorities used perjured testimony and bribed judges to convict Jomo Kenyatta as a Mau Mau leader, though the accused populist later rose to Kenya’s Presidency; two years still more proximate to the present, in 1955, back in the U.S., a baby girl took her first breath on her route to a life as the astonishing storyteller and essayist, Barbara Kingsolver; fifty-six years back, the Organization of American States followed U.S. suggestions in forming the Inter-American Development Bank as a bulwark against the likes of what had been transpiring and would continue to unfold in revolutionary Cuba; Northeast across the Atlantic, a year subsequently, in 1960, Holland returned territory to Germany in exchange for 280,000,000 Deutschmarks; three years further along in England, in 1963, a male baby was born who would grow up as Julian Lennon, songwriter, photographer, and famous son; a decade subsequently across the English Channel, in 1973,Pablo Picasso spent his last day among us; twenty years after that conjunction, Macedonia joined the United Nations as Yugoslavia came to pieces; eighteen years before this moment in time, soulful and complex singer-songwriter Laura Nyro died; eleven years later, in 2008, Bahraini architects and builders oversaw the creation of the world’s first large commercial building that wind turbines entirely powered. From Wikipedia Day in History

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
slavery history OR origins evolution resistance OR revolution abolition "color consciousness" "class consciousness" = 129 Citations.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

DRUG WAR’S VICIOUS SYSTEMIC OPPRESSION & PITIFUL, PALTRY ‘CLEMENCY’
http://truth-out.org/  A look first at a single case, and then at a sample of plus-or-minus a hundred thousand travesties, byTruthOut, that is emblematic of the lying, murderous, profiteering fraud machine that the U.S. ‘War-on-Drugs’ represents, despite the way that inmates maintain hope, service to each other, and a commitment to a decent life even in the teeth of a corrupt and monstrous system: “Her co-defendant, who had been arrested and incarcerated before, informed on her and 10 other people.  John, who had never been arrested before, was sentenced to 151 months (12.5 years){for under ten grams of crack}.  She was shuttled from federal prison to federal prison during her incarceration – from Greenville, Illinois, two hours from her mother in Chicago, to West Virginia to Waseca, Minnesota, to Danbury, where she met Phyllis Hardy and Andrea James. …’While I was incarcerated, I became a very good jailhouse lawyer,’ she told Truthout.  She assisted mothers with their custody cases, explaining to them that, although they were in prison, they still retained some rights.  She tutored women.  She worked on appeals – both her own and other women’s. ‘I won numerous custody cases and had terminations put on hold until the mom could be released and show that she could be a good mother,’ she recounted.  She also won several cases at the appellate level, including an appeal on the grounds of ineffective counsel and two sentence reductions on drug cases. 
         Helping to work on cases demonstrated the racial division in federal sentencing.  She recounted that she and another woman were sentenced the same week by the same judge.  The other woman had 15,000 grams of methamphetamine and a gun in her pocket when she was arrested.  She was sentenced to 121 months; John, for her 9.7 grams of crack cocaine and no gun, received 151 months.  The difference?  That woman was White; John is Black.  In addition, she noted that drug charges drew heftier sentences than other charges, including armed robbery. ‘ I always tell people, ‘I should have robbed a bank,’ she said.  ‘I know people who have robbed banks that only did four or five years.  I remember four Black girls who robbed five or six banks and got sentences of less than 10 years each.’  One of John’s successful appeals enabled a woman convicted of bank robbery to be released three years earlier.
          ‘The war on drugs destroyed the Black community. The war on drugs destroyed families. We are still picking up the pieces,’ she said.  ‘But the federal system is still wreaking havoc.  Even with all these new laws, it is still wreaking havoc.’  She points to the case of Tynice Hall, whom she adopted as a ‘daughter’ while in prison.  The mother of a 3-year-old and the girlfriend of a drug dealer who only knew that he paid her bills, Hall had no useful information to offer prosecutors in exchange for a lesser charge.  She was sentenced to 35 years.  Her son was sent to Texas to live with his grandmother, who could not afford to travel to prisons in West Virginia, Minnesota or Connecticut.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

Aura Estrada Short Story Contest
is one of three contests run each year by Boston Review.The winning author will receive US $1500 and have his or her work published in the summer edition of the magazine. First runner-up will be published in a following issue and second runner-up will be published on the Boston Review website. Entries close 1 October.

Conium Review Innovative Short Fiction Contest
is for new writing that takes risks. Submission may include any combination of flash fiction or short stories up to 7500 total words.The winner receives US$500 and publication. Entries open 1 February and close 1 May.

Lorian Hemingway Short Story Competition
is dedicated to recognising and supporting the work of emerging writers whose fiction has not yet achieved success. Entries must be less than 3500 words and the competition is open to writers based anywhere is the world. The winner receives US$1500 and publication. The Lorian Hemingway Short Story Competition first ran in 1981; entries close 15 May.

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Content Writing Job For Document Building Website (Scarborough ME) compensation: $16/Hour part-time  We are a document building website that needs a good content writer. Most of the work will be researching simple documents from Army to Divorce forms.

Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) seeks an experienced, engaging local host of NPR’s Morning Edition on its statewide network. Duties include the preparation and production of live local newscasts, weather breaks and other continuity elements, in a precisely timed format.  Additional duties include the production of feature pieces and interviews for use in Morning Edition and other programs as assigned. The successful candidate will join WPR’s award-winning team of journalists committed to outstanding local news coverage.  This position reports to the News Director; hours are Monday-Friday approximately 4:00 a.m. to 12 noon.

In-House Content Writer (Full and Part-Time Positions Available) (Rindge, NH)  $30,000/year (Full Time) | Part-Time Hourly Rate Based on Experience.  Wikimotive, a cutting-edge internet marketing company in the automotive industry, is looking to hire a full-time online content writer and blogger for its in-house team in Rindge, NH.

Public Relations Morgantown, WV – This position requires a Bachelor’s degree in the communications field such as Journalism, English, Communication Studies or related field. Master’s degree is preferred. Five (5) years’ experience with creating marketing pieces is required. Creating Marketing pieces in a variety of media and formats is preferred.

Tikkun is hiring a new managing  editor!     Do you believe journalism has a crucial role to play in healing and transforming the world? Are you a skilled editor who can move effortlessly from reshaping a news story on the struggle for a living wage to editing a scholarly essay on feminist theology? Tikkun magazine is looking for a full-time managing editor to produce its award-winning print magazine and manage its lively online content. 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

guitar music art performanceEpic American Documentary

A Rolling Stone posting that introduces readers to a powerful musical history movie in the making: Jack White, T Bone Burnett and Robert Redford have teamed up to executive produce American Epic, a historical music project encompassing a three-part documentary series, a feature-length film and companion album releases. The documentary and film will explore the pivotal early use of a primitive recording machine used by record companies in the 1920s as they toured America and “for the first time captured the raw expression of an emerging culture.” The American Epic documentary and film, directed by Bernard MacMahon, are scheduled to air on PBS and BBC Arena this fall.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Student Writing Opportunitites

A Yes Magazine posting that creates a teachability moment through providing thought-provoking articles and essay prompts: Use the YES! article, prompt, and sample essays in each writing lesson to bring the real world to your classroom—and to take your students’ writing to a new level.

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Brave Citizens Recording Conflicts

An Atlantic article that highlights the courage of citizen journalists recording key moments of injustice worldwide: “A couple hundred feet away, a Canadian named Paul Pritchard was recording the incident on his phone. His video—which was confiscated by police, and which he only reclaimed through litigation—did not match the police report.

The police and Pritchard’s video were so different as to resemble alternate worlds. The police had claimed three men approached Dziekanski. The video showed four. The police had claimed that Dziekanski was reaching for something on a desk when he was tased, as if preparing to assault the officers. The video showed he wasn’t. The police said they couldn’t have pepper-sprayed Dziekanski, as too many other people were nearby. The video showed that a plexiglass wall separated Dziekanski and the officers from anyone else in the airport.

The video made a difference.

Just last month, Benjamin Robinson was found guilty of perjury.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 Political Prisoner Health Rights

A posting from the National Lawyers Guild that brings to readers’ attention the myriad health needs of a famous political prisoner: ““Mumia’s medical situation is serious, he remains at risk, and must be allowed immediate and independent medical care without further delay,” said NLG member Bret Grote, attorney for Abu-Jamal. “We applaud the thousands of supporters worldwide who have called the Pennsylvania DOC demanding immediate medical attention and visitation rights for Mumia and encourage people of conscience to continue doing so until demands are met,” he added.

“Abu-Jamal’s voice and his political analysis have guided our work to end racially discriminatory mass incarceration. Now we must speak up for him, as he confronts yet another problem endemic to US prisons—lack of adequate health care,” said Pooja Gehi, Executive Director of the NLG.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

Jon Sullivan - public domain
Jon Sullivan – public domain

Donors Invalidating Debate

An Inside Philanthropy article that seeks to refute the obvious argument that the way that the interests and needs of donors defines and curtails the degree to what an honest conversation occur: “First, there’s no question that some nonprofits are sometimes afraid of antagonizing wealthy donors by embracing populist rhetoric or pushing for higher taxes and laws that strengthen labor organizing. Alas, that’s probably even been true at times for certain left-of-center policy groups. Reich doesn’t name names, and I won’t either. But I will say this: During the debate over financial reform in 2009 and 2010, there was a keen awareness among progressives that some policy groups that should have been out front on this issue were instead standing down, presumably because of ties to Wall Street.

That’s troubling, and the same thing has occasionally happened on other issues, like trade. Reich is right to call this out.”

for World Organization of Writers