9.30.2016 Day in History

drawing by hector gomez
drawing by hector gomez

Today is International Translators Day and, for those who decry enforced obeisance, the last day of September is also Blasphemy Day; towards the end of the times of Ancient Rome, one thousand five hundred ninety-six years ago, the iconic priest and theologian who went through life doing good deeds and extolling the virtues of moral philosophy as Saint Jerome, died; sixty-nine years later, in 489, the Ostrogoths under king Theoderic the Great defeated the forces of Odoacer for the second time at Verona; in always conflict-ridden Central Asia one thousand two hundred seventy-nine years ago, an Ummayad invasion ran into a Turgesh brick wall that maintained Turkic control of the fringes of Tang China; forty-seven decades precisely after that point, in 1207, the infant male who matured to become the famous Persian poet Rumi came into the world; four hundred seventy-four years ahead of now, Spanish plunderer Hernando de Soto led a group of his compatriots into Western Arkansas against tremendous indigenous resistance; the first performance of The Magic Flute opened in Vienna a quarter millennium hence, in 1791, Mozart’s last opera to debut, and Maximilien Robespierre and his cohorts took control of the French revolutionary process; a hundred fifty-six years back, England’s first tram operation opened in Birkenhead on the Mersey River; one hundred forty-eight years prior to today, the first volume of Little Women was published; fourteen years later across the Atlantic, in 1882, one of the world’s first electric power plants opened under the leadership of Thomas Edison and began producing electricity in Appleton, Wisconsin, and the male infant entered our midst who would grow up as the renowned nuclear physicist, Hans Geiger; ten years hence, in 1892, in Pennsylvania, plutocrat carnegie andrew carnegie plutocrats money eliteexecutive of Carnegie Steel convinced Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court to charge striking workers with treason, a tactic that helped to break labor’s work action in this case; one hundred twenty-one years ago, Madagascar became a French protectorate; four years after that moment, in 1899, also in Pennsylvania, Mary Harris(Mother) Jones, seventy years old, helped to organize miners’ wives to descend on a strike-bound facility and to agitate there, helping to win the strike; one hundred ten years prior to the present pass, the Royal Galician Academy started working in Havana; three years later still, in 1909, the Industrial Workers of the World issued its first Free Speech Call to workers who were willing to risk arrest in order to fight for the right to organize publicly for union representation, which almost everywhere in the U.S. then declared illegal; a half dozen years past that juncture, in 1915, striking railroad workers’ fight for an eight hour day and human rights came to pieces under court-ordered injunctions, strikebreakers’ replacements, and company thugs’ attacks; another four years onward, in 1919, sharecroppers—almost all Black—who were seeking to organize a union faced murderous ‘race riots’ in and around Elaine, Arkansas that brought about mass arrests and over a hundred deaths among workers; ninety-two years back, the infant who grew up to become prominent author Truman Capote was born; four years subsequently, in 1928, the baby boy who underwent the Holocaust and became Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel came into the world; seven years afterward, in 1935, the official dedication of hoover dam infrastricture waterHoover Dam took place on the Colorado River; the League of Nations unanimously, and the infant who was destined to become celebrated American singer-songwriter Johnny Mathis first cried out; three years hence, in 1938, condemned and outlawed “intentional bombings of civilian populations;” another three hundred sixty-five years onward, in 1939, the National Broadcasting Corporation broadcast the first televised football game; seventy-three years ahead of today, the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point was dedicated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt; six further onward, in 1949, the Berlin Airlift came to an end; another year past that point, in 1950, the baby girl was born whom fate had designated to mature as novelist and screenwriter Laura Esquivel; four years further along time’s road, in 1954, the U.S. Navy launched the world’s first nuclear-powered vessel, the submarine that bore the name Nautilus; eight years nearer to now, in 1962, Dolores Huerta and Caesar Chavez and colleagues founded the National Farm Workers Association, the nascent United Farm Workers, and in another civil rights score, James Meredith formally became a Black student at the University of Mississippi; two years further on, in 1964, Berkley University saw the staging of the first large scale antiwar demonstration; a year later, and half a world away in 1965, the Thirtieth of September Movement attempted a coup in Indonesia that led to reprisals in which over half a million died under suspicion of favoring communism; seven hundred thirty days thereafter, in 1967, back round the world in England, the British Broadcasting radio3Corporation restructured and expanded its radio operations; three years closer to today’s sun and air, in 1970, Jordan made a deal with the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine for the release of the remaining hostages from the Dawson’s Field hijackings; seven years past that conjunction, in 1977, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration endured budget cuts that forced the abandonment of equipment and research on the moon; three years still closer to the current pass, in 1980, three media and technology conglomerates, Xerox, Intel, and the Digital Equipment Corporation, first issued Ethernet specifications; two years down the pike, in 1982, seven people in the Chicago area died after consuming cyanide-laced Tylenol; four years even later on, in 1986, Israel’s intelligence apparatus kidnapped Mordecai Vanunu for the ‘crime’ of revealing his country’s criminal nuclear weapons program to British media; twenty-six years ago, Nobel Prize literary laureate Patrick White died; six years yet more proximate to the present, in 1996, the U.S. Congress passed an amendment that prohibited firearms ownership by anyone whose record included a domestic violence conviction; three years subsequent to that, in 1999, Japan’s worst nuclear accident until Fukushima occurred at a Uranium reprocessing facility near Tokyo; six years subsequent to today, in 2005, the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published some controversial drawings of Muhammad; and four years prior to today, the ecologist and thinker Barry Commoner died.