9.23.2016 Day in History

San Francisco Holocaust Memorial Wally Gobetz Flickr
San Francisco Holocaust Memorial Wally Gobetz Flickr

Today, Lithuania remembers the Holocaust with a Memorial Day: in central Asia eight centuries and a year back, a baby boy emerged into our midst who would mature as the great Kublai Khan; six hundred seventy-eight years before the here and now, the first naval engagement took place that involved the use of cannon, at the start of the Hundred Years War; just beyond seven decades later, in 1409, Mongol fighters scored their second major victory over Ming Chinese forces; three hundred seventy-four years prior to just this point in time, Harvard College graduated its first class of matriculants; thirty-three years beyond that, in 1675, the French founder of the Academie Francaise breathed his last; one hundred twenty-eight years hence, in 1803, the Second Anglo-Maratha war commenced between the British East India Company and the Indian Maratha Empire; three years subsequently, in 1806, Lewis and Clark returned to St. Louis from their perambulations throughout the upper Western United States; thirty-two years thereafter, in 1838, the baby girl who grew up to run for President and advocate free love as Victoria Woodhull had just entered the world; seven years beyond that juncture, in 1845, the first team began to play baseball under recognizably modern rules as the Knickerbockers Baseball Club; twenty-three years further along time’s path, in 1868, a Chicago labor press published The Other Side, perhaps the first novel of working class life in the U.S., written by the President of the Cooper’s Union, and the Puerto Rican revolt against Spanish rule took place; eighteen years afterward, in 1886, Illinois Knights of Labor members and allies formed the United Labor Party, which soon elected seven Assemblymen and one Senator to the State legislature; three further years down the pike, in 1889, Nintendo came into existence as a commercial entity to

CC BY-NC-ND by Marcos Castellano

market Japanese playing cards, and the infant child who grew up to become renowned journalist Walter Lippman was born; a decade closer to today, in 1899, an American ship commits an atrocious act of aggression against a Filipino battery at the Battle of Olongapo; two years after that moment in time, in 1901, Jaroslav Seifert, Czech poet and journalist and Nobel Laureate, was a just-emerged infant boy; eight years henceforth, in 1909, Phantom of the Opera first appeared in serialized form in Gaulois Magazine; an additional two years down the pike, in 1911, the first airmail delivery happens in America under the authority of the United States Post Office; thirteen year even closer to today’s light and air, in 1924, the baby boy destined to become the Nicaraguan publisher Pedro Joaquin Chamorro Cardenal came into the world; eighty-eight years ago, Chile’s leading voice for feminism, Maria Larrain de Vicuna breathed her last; two years closer to today, in 1930, a baby boy was born who grew up to become the legendary Ray Charles; under U.S. and British guidance seven hundred thirty-one days past that instant, in 1932, two small Arabian Peninsula kingdoms formed the basis of Saudi Arabia; half a dozen year later, in 1938, the mobilization of the Czechoslova army in response to the Munich Crisis takes place; a year later, in 1939, the legendary psychiatrist Sigmund Freud died; two years beyond that point, in 1941, the soon-enough activist and Black Panther leader George Jackson was a just-emerged Black infant; another two years hence, in 1943, across the Atlantic in Spain, a male child drew an initial breath en route to a life as the singer and songwriter, Julio Iglesias; six years subsequent to that conjunction, in 1949, back in the United States, another baby boy called out whose destiny was to croon and compose and scribe as the rocker Bruce Springsteen; two years yet later on, in 1952, Richard Nixon delivered his denial of corruption accusations in a televised presentation of what people soon called the “Checkers Speech;” seven years nearer to now, in 1959, an Iowa farmer hosted Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev in a visit, and the Dutch mixed martial artist and wrestler Hans Nijman breathed his last; and a decade later, in 1969, the Chicago Eight trial opened in Chicago; forty-four years prior to the present pass, the female infant destined to blog and write as Ana Marie Cox entered the world; a year after that, in 1973, Juan Peron returned to power in Argentina, and Chilean Nobel Prize winner Pablo Neruda died after fascists consolidated control of his country; seven years beyond that point in time, in 1980, Bob Marley played what ended up being his last concert in Pittsburgh; three hundred sixty-five days even more proximate to the present, in 1981, the Canadian performer, poet, and Native American Activist Dan George released his spirit from the Earth; fifteen years subsequently, in 1996, a 42-month strike by Steelwprkers at Bayou Steel in Louisiana ended in a new contract and the ousting of scabs; sixteen years ahead of today’s light and air, journalist and commentator and activist Carl Rowan died, two more years down the temporal road, in 2002, Mozilla released the first iteration of Firefox, and California governor Gray Davis signed legislation making it the first state to offer workers paid family leave.