8.10.2016 Day in History

CC BY-SA by justinpickard

All over the planet, today is World Biodiesel Day; in what is today the area where Germany’s and Austria’s borders meet, a thousand sixty-one years ago, Holy Roman imperial troops dealt a crushing blow to Magyar incursions into the Western reaches of Europe, essentially ending Hungarian attempts at far-flung conquest; one thousand twenty-five years prior to the present pass, during the proud era of Vikings and as different European tribal factions struggled for dominance, a band of inland-raiding vikings defeated the English near Maldon, Essex; four hundred and ninety-seven years before the present day, a fleet of five ships under the command of Ferdinand Magellan set out from Seville with the purpose of circumnavigating the planet; fifty-six years subsequently, in 1675, English builders, under the guise of natural science researchers, laid the foundation of the Royal Greenwich Observatory; five years subsequently, in 1680, across the North Atlantic and much of North America, Native American Pueblo tribes initiated an uprising against Spanish depredations in what is now New Mexico; three quarters of a century afterward, in 1755, victorious British forces began deporting ‘refusenik’ Acadians to what is now Louisiana; one year further from that, in 1776, word of America’s Declaration of Independence reaches London; two hundred twenty-one years prior to the present pass, French citizens revolted against a key symbol of aristocratic power with the sacking of the Tuileries Palace; three hundred sixty-five days later still, in 1793, the nascent republic opened the Royal residence at the Louvre to the French common people; two decades from that point on, in 1813, one of Chile’s founding fathers opens Chile’s oldest and most prestigious school, the Instituto Nacional; one hundred ninety-five years back, Missouri came into the fold of the United States as a slave state, forestalling the potential for civil conflict about the issue of human bondage; twenty-five years later, in 1846, Congress approved the establishment of the Smithsonian Institution on the basis of James Smithson’s half-million dollar gift to the United States; one hundred twenty-seven years back saw the birth of Charles Darrow, the man responsible for the game Monopoly; one hundred and fifteen years ahead of today’s light, the craft workers and industrial workers in the steel industry struck against monopoly manufacturers to seek recognition for their amalgamated union; four years nearer to now, in 1905, the United States mediated peace negotiations in New Hampshire between the Russians and the Japanese to end their Western Pacific conflict; seven years afterward, in 1912, a male infant was born whose destiny involved the creation of tie iconic narratives of love and humanity of Jorge Amado; a year hence, in 1913, across the Atlantic and through the Mediterranean, Balkan nations brought their second major war in the 20th century to a close, in anticipation of next year’s World War carnage; seven years later on the dot, in 1920, World War One’s

Ottoman Empire postage stamp Double M flickr
Ottoman Empire postage stamp Double M flickr

Treaty of Sevres for the Ottomans dismantled that empire and divvied up those territories among Britain and France and Italy; eleven years past that point, in 1931, 24 activists from across the country founded the Air Line Pilots Association at a meeting in Chicago; four years further along time’s arc, in 1935, hundreds of the Transport Workers Union descended on a New York City courthouse so as to bail out their president, Mike Quill, and four additional union leaders whom city officials had arrested after having picketed the IRT offices; an additional four years beyond that, in 1939, President Roosevelt signed an amendment to the 1935 Social Security Act that would provide benefits for dependents and survivors; sixty-eight years back, the hit radio show Candid Mocrophone made the successful transition to television as Candid Camera; a year after that conjunction, in 1949, in a piece of more political theatre, Harry Truman signed into law National Security Act provisions that reformulated the honestly-named Department of War ad the Orwellian Department of Defence, among other actions; half a decade later, in 1954, the modern engineering miracle of the Saint Lawrence Seaway began to unfold with the groundbreaking ceremony; fifty five years in the past, the U.S. Army first used its horrific, murderous chemical weapon, Agent Orange; three hundred sixty-five days beyond that, in 1962, the baby girl first opened her eyes whose detiny was to write radical novels of human liberation as Suzanne Collins; twenty-eight years behind us, President Reagan sought to redress some of the ills committed against Japanese American citizens during World War Two with the Civil Liberties Act of 1988; two years onward from that point, in 1990, the Magellan space probe first probed the fiery atmosphere of Venus, and, back on planet Earth and towards Southeast Asia, paramilitary troops massacred over 120 Muslims in Sri Lanka; five additional years towards the future, in 1995, the men responsible for the Oklahoma City bombing met with the swift hand of justice which will decide their fates; even four more years beyond that moment, in 1999, the prominent Indian historian, scholar, and critic Acharya Baldev Upadhyaya breathed his last; three years even further along time’s arc, in 2001, Angola train passengers perished in a terrorist train attack; seven years later, in 2008, the iconic and award-winning singer-songwriter, producer, and actor Isaac Hayes sung his last tune; seven hundred and thirty days nearer still to our own light and air, in 2010, President Obama signed a $26 billion bill to protect 300,000 teachers, police and others from layoffs brought about by austerity measures required after he decide to bail out criminal banks instead of average citizens; another two years after that, in 2012, Marikana miners in South Africa took part in a bloody commemoration of the 1977 miners uprising, action that erupted into wildcat strikes to improve working conditions.