6.26.2017 Day in History

Today is an International Day in Support of Victims of Torture and, in an anomalous concomitant celebration, an International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking; in

Marcus Tullius Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero

Rome two thousand thirteen years back, in complex imperial machinations, Augustus ‘adopted’ his adult stepson, Tiberius, to avoid succession difficulties for the empire; just one year less than thirty-six decades hence, in 363, Rome’s Emperor Julian died in battle in retreat from Persia’s Sassanid Empire, and Jovian rose from the ranks to claim the throne; three hundred thirty-six years later, in 699, a Japanese herbalist and natural healer, whose thinking became the basis for the folk religion Shugendo, found himself banished by ruling elements who rejected his folk connections; seven hundred and seventy-four years ahead of this moment in time, Mongol forces extended their imperial reach by crushing armies of the Seljuk Turks at the battle of Köse Dag; six hundred and eight years prior to the present pass, a triple schism for a brief period fractured the Western Christian churches into separate Catholic sects; a century and thirteen years later, in 1522, Ottoman fighters invested a second siege of Rhodes that succeeded in driving out Teutonic fighters from the island; four years less than two centuries hence, in 1718, in similar Slavic machinations of empire and mayhem, Russia’s ‘Great’ Peter lost his son to a mysterious death after he the king had ordered the young man executed for plotting against his father; half a decade beyond that point, in 1723,  in another expansion of Russia’s geopolitical agenda, the empire’s forces extracted a surrender of the defenders of Baku; across Europe and the Atlantic, seventeen years afterward in 1740, free Blacks, indigenous peoples, and rebel Spaniards fought off British troops near St. Augustine, to establish a semi independent presence in what is now Northern Florida; one hundred thirty-one years before the here and now, Henri Moisson first isolated elemental Fluorine, laying the basis for both the modern aluminum and uranium industries; six years thereafter, in 1892, a prominent family of missionaries and scholars brought a baby girl into the world whose destiny was to win the Nobel Prize in Literature as Pearl S. Buck; thirteen years henceforth, in 1907, across the Atlantic and most of the European portion of the Eurasian land mass, a revolutionary bank robbery occurred in Tbilisi Georgia; three hundred sixty-six days closer to today, in 1908, eight thousand miles away in Chile, a baby boy was born whose fate destined him to become a much loved President, elected as a socialist, whom the CIA had assassinated for his temerity in that regard; seven more years along the temporal path, in 1915, a baby girl entered the world who would live a long life as the poet and children’s writer and publisher, Charlotte Zolotow; eighty-three years ago, in a move to support fdr roosevelt WWII

community banking, President Roosevelt signed the Federal Community Credit Union act; four years subsequently, in 1938, a voice of Black America, James Weldon Johnson, breathed his last; another year along the road, in 1939, the British author of tense domestic scenes and universal human themes, Ford Maddox Ford, died; three years still more proximate to the present, in 1942, more or less five thousand miles Southeast, a male infant was born who became the renowned singer and songwriter and popular political champion, Gilberto Gil; three years henceforth, in 1945, allied and neutral nations signed the charter of the United Nations; three years more proximate to the present, in 1948, iconic storyteller Shirley Jackson published her allegorical dystopian Southern gothic short fiction, “The Lottery’, in the New Yorker, and William Shockley filed the initial patent for a bipolar junction transistor, thereby laying the basis for the ‘solid-state’ era; four years hence, in 1952, a male child of the working class came into our midst who matured as the radical firebrand and lawyer and investigative reporter, Greg Palast; three years even closer to now, in 1955, the African National Congress issued its Freedom Charter at a South African Peoples Congress; four years forward from that point, in 1959, something like eight thousand miles Northwest, the United States opened the Saint Lawrence Seaway and the Great Lakes region to ocean-going shipping for the first time; yet four years more down the pike, in 1963, John F. Kennedy spoke to a German crowd to declare “Ich bin ein Berliner;” forty-three years ago, the first Universal Product Code scanning took place, of a package of chewing gum in Ohio; a year later, in 1975, a gunfight occurred at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the upshot of which was the still-disputed conviction of Leonard Peltier for the deaths of two F.B.I. agents in that altercation; twenty-two years hence, in 1997, the U.S. Supreme Court found the Communications Decency Act unconstitutionally vague in its attempts to ‘sanitize’ the Internet of pornography; three years past that conjunction, in 2000, Bill Clinton announced the sequencing of the entire human genome; three years after that juncture, in 2003,another end-of-term Supreme Court decision pronounced that same-sex anti-sodomy laws were uncsonstitutional; five years back, the popular and screenwriter and thinker, Nora Ephron, played her final scene; exactly one year after, in 2013, the Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act. From Wikipedia Day in History