6.07.2017 Day in History

Today in Argentina is Journalists Day; in Palestine nine hundred eighteen years ago, the ongoing predation and geopolitical mayhem of the region and its relations with Europe continued with the initiation of the Siege of Jerusalem during the First Crusade; a half decade less than four centuries subsequent to that, in 1494, Spain and Portugal continued the expression of arrogant European imprimatur with the Treaty of Tordesillas that divided the world between the two Iberian powers; two hundred and forty years in advance of today, in 1776, Virginian representative to the Continental Congress, Henry Lee, introduced a resolution that, after Henry Adams seconded it, would soon lead to the penning of the Declaration of Independence; a dozen years onward from that, in 1788, another revolutionary precursor occurred across  the wide Atlantic, in Grenoble, France, where citizens threw roof tiles at Royal soldiers and constabulary; twenty-two years hence, in 1810, South across the Atlantic in Argentina, that soon-to-be new nation’s printing presses first included the Gazeta de Buenos Ayres; fifty-two years later, in 1862, the United States demanded and received England’s agreement to suppress the slave trade; a mere year in the future from that, in 1863, the French imperial intervention in Mexico yielded the capture of Mexico City by a contingent of French troops; a thousand ninety-six days after that, in 1866, some fifteen hundred miles North, the Duwamish tribal leader Seattle breathed his last; twenty-six years hence, in

CC BY-NC-ND by fanz
CC BY-NC-ND by fanz

1892, Homer Plessy refused to relinquish a White’s Only train seat, which soon enough led to the important validation of White Supremacy by the Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson; another year in the direction of now, in 1893, eight thousand miles or so Southeast in South Africa, Mahatma Ghandi committed an initial and similar, act of civil disobedience in South Africa; a half decade stiull further along time’s pat, in 1899, radical abolitionist Carrie Nation began her violent attack on the sale of libations with an arson against a bar in Kiowa, Kansas; an additional five years in the future, in 1904, ten years and one day after official intervention in favor of miners in Cripple Creek, reactionary mine-owning gangsters attacked and arrested hundreds of protesting mine workers; three hundred sixty-five days thereafter, in 1905, six thousand miles across North America and the North Atlantic, in 1905, Norway officially dissolved its union with Sweden; eight years yet later on, in 1913, backing the United States, in New York, striking textile workers performed a massive pageant in a single performance of working class music and life at Madison Square Garden; a thousand four hundred sixty-one days past that juncture of solidarity, in 1917,  ‘Allied’ forces further developed technologies of mass destruction with the successful use of buried ammonal nitrate bombs beneath German trenches that killed as many as 10,000 German soldiers, and in happier news across the Atlantic, the little baby girl opened her eyes who would rise as poet and activist Gwendolyn Brooks; a dozen years henceforth, in 1929, a bit to the South in Italy, the signing of the Lateran Treaty established the Vatican as its own formal jurisdiction, and across the wide ocean in North Carolina, the killing of a Sheriff in Gastonia, by his own deputies in the midst of a massive strike and company repression solidarityagainst the textile workers there, lays the basis for criminal charges and convictions against the workers, for the crimes of asserting their human rights; seven years afterward, in 1936, the forces of social justice and labor celebrated a better day with the formation of the Steelworkers Organizing Committee; seven hundred and thirty days subsequently, in 1938, halfway around the world in China, Nationalist combatants against the Japanese released the impounded waters of the Yellow River, hoping to destroy Japanese soldiers, and instead killed close to a million civilians; half a decade farther onward still, in 1943, back in the US, a female infant was born who would mature as the poet and critic Nikki Giovanni; five years still further along, in 1948, across the ocean and much of Europe and Czechoslovakia, the ten-President resigned rather than accepting the establishment of a Communist regime in his country; four years yet nearer to now, in 1952, a male child uttered his first cry en route to a life of storytelling and Nobel Prize fame as Orhan Pamuk; two years further down the pike, in 1954, the estimable mathematician and progenitor of much of computer science, Alan Turing, took his own life, and across the Atlantic, the female infant entered our midst who would become the acclaimed writer and popular poet Louise Erdrich; a single years beyond that blessed entrance, in 1955,  the two-decade-old radio program, Lux Radio radio3Theatre, folded its tent as television gobbled up its listeners; a decade even closer to the current context, in 1965, the US Supreme Court allowed the United States to enter modern existence with its decision in Griswold v. Connetticutt, that legalized contraception for married people; a pair of years forward in time, in 1967, across the Altantic and much of the Mediterranean, precisely nine hundred and sixty eight years after Crusaders besieged Jerusalem in the First Crusade, Israeli defense forces entered the city in their conquest in the midst of the Six Day War, and comedian and critic Dorothy Parker lived out her final scene; three years still later, in 1970, the lugubrious but well-regarded novelist, E M Forster, spent his final day alive; exactly three hundred and sixty-five days after that, in 1961, the US Supreme Courts reversed activist Paul Cohen’s conviction for disturbing the peace, in so doing establishing the right to use lewd speech; not quite a decade further along time’s arc, in 1980, the champion of the salacious yarn, Henry Miller, breathed his last; another year more proximate to the present pass, in 1981, Israeli fighter bombers illegally destroyed Iraq’s Osiraq nuclear reactor in one of the Jewish state’s many unpunished acts of war; a quarter century even closer to today, in 2006, the offshoot of the Steelworkers Organizing Committee, the United Steelworkers of America, combined with the Sierra Club to lay the basis for the Blue Green Alliance, a combination of labor and environmental activists; eight years afterward, in 2014,  the nearly one hundred year old South African liberation activist, Epainette Mbeki, died.