6.01.2017 Day in History

By Christopher J. Fynn (Own work)
By Christopher J. Fynn (Own work)

Today is a Global Day of Parents and International Children’s Day, as well as standing in for World Milk Day and Neighbors Day on the international scene; in China eight hundred two years ago precisely, forces under the leadership of Mongol emperor, Genghis Khan, completed their capture of the city and surrounding areas that are now Beijing, thereby furthering Mongol conquest of China; seven hundred eighteen years in advance of our dawning light, Lithuanian Pagans and Rigan Christians combined to defeat Teutonic knights of the Livonian Order in ongoing warfare between Prussians and Slavs; three years less than two centuries subsequently, across the Eurasian landmass and over the English channel, in 1495, Friar John Cor wrote down the recipe for the first known batch of Scotch whisky; four decades later to the day, in 1535, Holy Roman Imperial troops overran Ottoman forces and established European rule in Tunis; a century and fourteen years later, in 1649, restive indigenous Filipinos began the Sumuroy insurrection against the Spanish colonial rule, one of countless uprisings against colonial rule over the years; eleven years hence, in 1660, around the world in Massachusetts Bay Colony, authorities hanged a woman guilty of the ‘crime’ of being a Quaker in their midst; just a year short of a hundred and ten years thereafter, in 1769, the prominent Edward Holyoke, who had been Harvard’s chief officer for more than twenty years, gave up his ghost in Massachusetts; a simple decade past that point, in 1779, further South in the English colonies, authorities arrested Benedict Arnold on suspicion of treason for funneling information to the British about Continental plans; thirteen years more proximate to the present, in 1792, Kentucky became the fifteenth United States jurisdiction; four years still further along time’s arc, in 1796, Tennessee followed suit as the sixteenth state; sixteen years still later, in 1812, U.S. President James Madison requested a declaration of war against the British; a thousand ninety-five days forward from that passage in space and time, across the wide Atlantic in 1815, the recently-absconded from Elba Napoleon oversaw a plebiscite for a French Constitution, which passed overwhelmingly, both liberalizing censorship and other harsh aspects of rule and placing Mssr. Bonaparte in charge for the remaining month prior to his recapture and imprisonment; a hundred and eighty six years back, James Clark Ross increased human understanding of our planetary home with his discovery of the magnetic North Pole; twelve years beyond that intersection, in 1843, a Scottish male infant shouted out en route to becoming Henry Faulds, the promulgator of an altogether different sort of scientific advance, the conceptualization of fingerprinting; an additional dozen years beyond that time, in 1855, much closer to the equator in the Western Hemisphere, William Walker led an insurrection that put him briefly in charge of Nicaraguan territory that had been, and would soon be again, under William Vanderbilt’s sway; seven hundred and thirty one days in the future from that point, in 1857, four thousand miles north east across the Atlantic in Paris, Charles Baudelaire published his affecting and eerie critique of Parisian bourgeois conformity Les Fleurs du Mal; eleven years later, in 1868, six thousand miles back the other way, in the South Western United States, semi-genocidal U.S. policy ‘offered’ Navajo people The Treaty of Bosque Redondo allowing them to return to their own territory after forcing them to walk  a thousand miles to leave one enforced reservation and enter another; two decades thereafter, in 1888, the American Federation of Labor recognized Ladies Federal Labor Union #2703 in Illinois that brought together women from various trades and occupations under a union banner; just seven hundred thirty days past that juncture, in 1890, the United States Census Bureau began using a Hollerith analog computing machine to tabulate its results; eight years farther along in the direction of now, in 1898, Congress passed the Erdman Act, which prohibited railroad industry contracts that either prohibited unions or permitted eliminating company liability for injuries on the job; half a decade further down the pike, in 1903, largely Mexican mineworkers whom the Western Federation of Miners had largely ignored organized themselves and struck, thousands-strong in solidarity for an eight hour day and against a ten percent wage cut, in the mines around the Mexican border in Clifton, Arizona; ten years subsequent to that precise conjunction, in 1913, in a warm-up for World War One, Greece and Serbia cemented a treaty that made a Second Balkan War—from which archducal assassinations emerged—unavoidable; three hundred sixty-five sunrises afterward, back in Western North America in 1914,National Guard troops took over the collieries where company assassins had just butchered a score of innocents in a striking mining camp near Ludlow, Colorado; two years later on, in 1916, the appointment of Louis Brandeis as the Supreme Court justice marked the first Jewish representation on the High Court, and plus or minus thirteen thousand International Workers of the World longshoreman up and down the Pacific coast struck for union recognition and better working conditions; half a decade after that juncture, in 1921, across the continent in Tulsa, White Supremacy destroyed ethnic harmony as brutal attacks on Black communities continued in a massive ‘race riot;’ a year hence, in 1922,  five thousand miles away in Northern Ireland, Britain established the Royal Ulster Constabulary as an oppressive colonial force against the local Irish populace, while back in the United States as many as sixty thousand railroad shopmen struck across the country against reduced wages; seven hundred thirty-one days after that exact instant, in 1924, a baby boy was born whom fate had selected as the thinker, activist, and religious leader, William Sloane Coffin; another two years henceforth, in 1926, a baby male entered the world who would grow up as the folksy and beloved Andy Griffith, whose acting and storytelling abilities were almost legendary; three years afterward, in 1929, multiple South American countries’ Communist parties met for the first time to express solidarity and discuss strategy in Buenos

Buenos Aires Luis Argerich
Buenos Aires Luis Argerich

Aires; a year yet nearer to now, in 1930, a male child opened his eyes who would rise in Puerto Rico as the Marxist thinker, scientist, activist, and public intellectual, Richard Levins; two years later to the day, in 1932, a male infant was born who would grow up as Christopher Lasch, an enemy of narcissism and a proponent of responsibility both individual and collective; nine years further down the road, in 1941, across the Atlantic and North Africa in South West Asia, while English forces consolidated their control, a slaughter of Iraqi Jews took place at Baghdad which led to a Diaspora; eleven years even closer to the current context, in 1952, philosopher and educator John Dewey breathed his last; a decade beyond that conjunction, in 1962, a Royal commission in England filed its report that recommended against the commercialization of English Radio and Television and the expansion of American cultural hegemony, while Israeli authorities executed Adolph Eichmann for crimes against humanity during World War Two; four years yet later on, in 1966, a Farmworkers Organizing Committee strike unfolded in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley; a mere year past that point in space and time, in 1967, back in Europe, the greatest English commercial cultural success since Shakespeare issued its iconic deconstruction of bourgeois values, which the Beatles entitledSergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band; another three hundred sixty-six days further along, in 1968, the estimable and beloved icon of human struggle and cooperation, Helen Keller, exited a realm where her powers had expanded beyond the sensations of sight and hearing that she lacked; three years hence, in 1971, the incisive thinker about ethics and religion, Reinhold Niebuhr, left the Earthly realm; three more years down the pike, in 1974, Emergency Medicine first published a description of the Heimlich Maneuver, and a little baby girl came screaming into our midst en route to life as the singer and songwriter Alanis Morissette; a thousand four hundred and sixty-one days nearer to this day in time, in 1978, the first filings took place for patents under the Patent Cooperation Treaty regime; a pair of years more proximate to the present, in 1980, the Cable News Network first began operation; ten years more along time’s arc, in 1990, Mikhail Gorbachev and George Herbert Walker Bush agreed to protocols putatively to eliminate chemical weapons production; eleven additional years on the march to today, in 2001, the popular comic artist and creator of Dennis the Menace lived out his final scene; three years later still, in 2004, the prolific and respected historian of the American establishment, William Manchester, died; five years to the day closer to now, in 2009, General Motors went bankrupt, becoming the largest such dissolution in history.