5.26.2017 Day in History

pfunked Deviant Art
pfunked Deviant Art

Today in the U.S.A. is National Paper Airplane Day, while, more soulfully, Australia marks this date as a National Day of Healing; in Rome two thousand years back, Germanicus returned to Rome as a conqueror of German tribes west of the Elbe river; four hundred and thirty four years subsequently, in 451, the rising Persian Sassanid Empire sent forces to defeat Armenian rebels at the Battle of Avarayr, the upshot of which was the Armenian right to practice Christianity; six hundred and eighty-nine years before this point in time, William of Ockham and some of his Franciscan colleagues fled Avignon in anticipation of excommunication or worse from the Pope as schism loomed; two hundred ten years subsequently, in 1538, the leaders of the Swiss canton centered on Geneva exiled John Calvin and all of his ‘protesting’ followers; ninety nine years hence, in 1637, British leaders in New England practiced the fine art of divide-and-conquer by recruiting Mohegan Native Americans to join Colonial troops in slaughtering five hundred or more Pequot villagers in Connecticut; one decade later exactly, in 1647, also in Connecticut, colonial authorities killed the first ‘witch’ in British North America by hanging her for her putative beliefs; precisely one hundred twenty-three years later, in 1770, the Orlove Revolt erupted, and met ignominious destruction by Ottoman rulers in Greece; thirteen additional years in time’s march, in 1783, across Europe and the wide Atlantic, the new United States declared a jubilee day to celebrate its recent victories over British forces; a hundred ninety-six years back, Greek rebels constituted the Peloponnesian Senate en route to their successful establishment of an independent Greek state; a thousand ninety-six days beyond that revolutionary conjunction, in 1824, again across Europe and the wide Atlantic, men and women shoe workers in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, rose up in the continent’s first ‘coed’ strike; four years subsequently, in 1828, Northward in Germany, authorities came across an apparently feral child wandering the streets of Nuremberg; two years thereafter, in 1830, across the Atlantic in the Southern United States, the Indian Removal Act took effect, disfranchising and destroying indigenous communities throughout

from Espresso Stalinist
from Espresso Stalinist

the Southern Appalachians, especially the Cherokee; twenty seven years after that point, in 1857, the estimable former bondsman Dred Scott received his freedom for a brief period before thugs and reactionary courts re-enslaved him; a dozen years past that passage, in 1869, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts chartered Boston University; a decade down the road from that, in 1879, Russia and England ‘disposed’ of the future of Afghanistan through the machinations of the Gandamak treaty; a decade and a half henceforth, in 1894, the Western Federation of Miners went on strike in Cripple Creek, Colorado, for the 8-hour day and higher wages; three hundred sixty-five days further along, in 1895, the baby girl was born who would grow up as insightful photographer and social chronicler, Dorothea Lange; another year beyond that conjunction, in 1896, Charles Dow issued the first compilation of the Dow Jones Industrial Average; another three hundred sixty-five days along time’s arc, in 1897, Bram Stoker celebrated a somewhat different publishing event across the Atlantic with his publication of Dracula; three years further up the temporal stream, in 1900, Colombian factions fought each other in civil strife that happenstantially served United States interests in Panama; eight years more proximate to the present, in 1908, the first big oil strike in Southwest Asia took place in Persia, which the Anglo-Persian Oil Company instantly claimed as the property of the British Empire; half a decade yet nearer to now, in 1913, a hundred or so New York performers aggregated themselves as the Actors Equity Union; one year later still, in 1914, the respected and probing photographer and documentarian, Jacob Riis, drew a final breath; half a dozen years ago, in 1920, the International Workers of the World helped to organize a strike of transport workers in Philadelphia to gain some of the luchre that shippers had made during the war, and a female child entered our midst en route to a life as the crooner and wordsmith Peggy Lee; four years past that exact instant, in 1924, acclaimed cellist and music maker Victor Herbert, who founded the  American Society of Composers, Artists, and Publishers, breathed his last; an additional one thousand four hundred and sixty-one days in the direction of today, in 1928, the baby boy was born who would become ‘Dr. Death,’ AKA Jack Kevorkian; nine years further forward in time, in 1937, labor unrest unfolded as 100,000 steelworkers in seven states struck against fascist employers for their human rights as the Memorial Day weekend began, and Nazi sympathizer Henry Ford called out goons on United Auto Workers organizers in the Battle of the Overpass near Detroit; one year subsequent to that moment, in 1938, in Washington, the House Un-American Activities Committee held its first session, and six thousand miles away in Russia, a female infant entered our midst who would mature as the acclaimed storyteller, writer, artist, and performer Lyudmila Petrushevskaya; two years subsequent to that juncture, in 1940, back in the U.S. a male child uttered its first cry en route to life as the iconic musical performer and songwriter, Levon Helm; eight years still further on down life’s highway, in 1948, the United States made its Civil Air Patrol a permanent institution; a mere year yet later on, in 1949, a baby male took an initial breath on his way to becoming Ward Cunningham, the creator of the World’s first Wiki, while another baby boy shouted out who would come to sing and write as the redoubtable bard and singer, Hank Williams, Jr., and across the Atlantic, an infant male opened his eyes who guitar music art performancewould rise as the scrappy scribe and political wizard, Jeremy Corbyn; two decades passage toward now, on the dot, in 1969, the Apollo moon program’s ninth rocket returned to Earth, having tested all the systems and components that would be necessary to carry out a moon landing on the next mission or so; three years in the future from that precise point, in 1972, the U.S. and the Soviet Union agreed to the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, a step back from the cusp of Holocaust that leaders now would do well to recall; four years further on, in 1976, philosopher of being and time and occasional follower of reaction, Martin Heidegger, was no more; twenty-two years henceforth, in 1998, Australia inaugurated its first “National Sorry Day,” in which some million citizens or more offered and accepted apologies for all and sundry sins and wrongs; six years further onward, in 2004, Terry Nichols stood in the dock as a jury of Coloradans found him guilty of a hundred sixty-one murders that he and cohort Timothy McVeigh had committed in Oklahoma City; four years still farther down the pike, in 2008, filmmaker and screenwriter Sidney Pollack died.