5.03.2017 Day in History

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This date marks Japan’s acceptance of U.S. political hegemony with that nation’s celebration of Constitution Day, and around the planet, citizens commemorate World Press Freedom Day, a fundamental human right; in post-Roman Italy, five hundred and forty-nine years ago, a male infant bounced into our presence who would mature as the deep thinker and often caricatured schemer Niccolo Machiavelli; three hundred and one years before today’s dawning, in 1715,  a solar eclipse across much of Northern Europe and Asia confirmed new cosmic methods that Edmond Halley had predicted within a few minutes; ninety five years hence, in 1810, the poet Byron swam the Hellespont; thirty-nine years subsequently in 1849, radical protesters in Dresden began the final German installment of the European Revolution of 1848, and slightly further North in Denmark, a baby boy opened his eyes who would rise as the estimable documentarian and advocate of the poor, Jacob Riis; half a dozen years beyond that intersection in time and space, in 1855, William Walker of Tennessee displayed the arrogance and impunity of the slave-owning class, which also marked the upper crusts of the U.S. in general, when he left San Francisco with a few score co-conspirators in order to overthrow and plunder Nicaragua; another dozen years onward toward today, in 1867, the Hudson Bay Company finally relinquished all its claims to Vancouver Island; just short of two decades after that instant in time, in 1886, Eastward in the center of the continent in Chicago, in police murdered several protesters in a huge labor battle with the McCormick Harvesting Combine Company on the eve of the false flag Haymarket Massacre; nine years in the future from that, in 1895,  Eugene Debs and several cohorts with the Pullman workers suffered at the hands of the reactionary plutocratic state when they all received six months in prison for contempt of court, for the ‘crime’ of organizing workers into unions; eighteen years henceforth, in 1913, Indian filmmakers release the Subcontinent’s first feature movie, and a male child gave his first cry who would mature as the dramatist and thinker William Inge; two years more in the direction of now, in 1915, an English officer issues what has become an iconic, if sentimental, statement about the brutalities of war, ‘In Flanders Field;’ four years thereafter, in 1919, a little baby boy sang out whom fate had selected to fill the shoes of the renowned and beloved and ‘red’ folk

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singer Pete Seeger; another two years further along time’s path, in 1921, the state of West Virginia became the first to legislate a comprehensive sales tax, albeit it did not immediately go into effect, and across the wide Atlantic, a partial independence for Ireland happened when the southern part of the island became its own republic, and northern Ireland remained a part of the UK; three years afterward, in 1924, a German Jewish male child took his first breath en route to a life as the German-born Israeli writer and poet Yehuda Amichai; nine years hence, in 1933, another boy infant entered our midst whose destiny was to grow as the iconic crooner and lyricist of soul, James Brown; a thousand four hundred sixty-one days nearer to now, in 1937, Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction; nine years later, in 1946, the Japanese war crimes trial began;  a year past that instant in space and time, in 1947, Japan’s post-World War Two constitution came into effect, embodying the military management model that Douglas MacArthur epitomized and the businesslike efficiency of a modern ‘liberal,’ corporate, ‘free market’ state; a year later, in 1948, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision that prohibited the enforcement of covenants to exclude Blacks and other minorities as future purchasers of real estate; just ten hundred ninety-five days further down the pike, in 1951, the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations and Armed Services Committees began their closed door hearings to investigate the forced resignation of Douglas MacArthur from command of U.S. forces in Korea for insubordination; nine years afterward, in 1960, a different sort of eventuality unfolded as the musical Fantasticks opened off-Broadway on its way to becoming the longest-running musical comedy in history, and the European Free Trade Association came into existence; three years yet later on, in 1963, police in Birmingham Alabama, after a period of watch-and-wait in relation to civil rights marchers and activists, began to employ harsh tactics such as water cannons and unleashed attack dogs against protesters in the city; a decade and a half even closer to the current context, in 1978, a Digital Equipment Corporation sales operative dispatched a mass batch e-mail to every DARPA-net address in the Western U.S., the world’s first mass spamming; another twenty-three years more proximate to the present pass, in 2001, for the first time, the U.S. failed to garner a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Commission.