5.02.2017 Day in History

Baltimore Algebra Project
Baltimore Algebra Project

Today is a very educational day, as it marks National Education Day in Indonesia, and Teacher’s Day in Iran; burning out a long-burning candle of genius, four hundred ninety-eight years ago, the polymathic Leonardo da Vinci breathed his last; four hundred fifty-eight years ago, John Knox returned to Scotland from exile , soon to become a leader of the Scottish Reformation; fifty-two years hence, in 1611, literary history was made when the King James English version of the Bible was published in London for the first time; a century and eighteen years after that, in 1729, the legendary Cathering the Great of Russia was born; forty-three years still later on, in 1772, literary giant Novalis came to the world in Germany; three hundred sixty-five days from that point on, in 1773, a baby boy first cried out on his way to becoming Norwegian philosopher and poet Henrik Steffens; one hundred fifty-one years ago, in Callao, Peruvian defenders fought off the Spanish fleet, pointing the way to future independence; sixteen years hence, in 1879, the Spanish Socialist Worker’s Party was founded in Madrid; two years closer to now, in 1881, the Russian politician Kerensky was born; six years still closer to now, Cree and Assiniboine warriors won the Battle of Cut Knife, a decisive moment in their war against Canadian forces; nine year further down the line, in 1894, the baby first cried out on his way to becoming celebrated English biologist, philosopher, and academic; a year after that, in 1895, another baby boy bound for a future as a literary man, Lorenz Hart, was born; still eight years down the pike, in 1903, the baby destined to become celebrated future pediatrician and controversial pedagogue Benjamin Spock first cried out; nine years hence, in 1912, another baby boy first cried out on his way to becoming German journalist and publisher Axel Springer; three years later, in 1915, the International Congress of Women accepts resolutions; five more years from that point, in 1920. the first of the Negro National League baseball games took place; three years later, in 1923, the baby boy who would grow up to be Joseph Heller of Catch-22 fame first cried out; ten years from then on, in 1933, Hitler busted trade unions; eight years later still, in 1941, following the coup against Iraq prince earlier that year, the UK launched the Anglo Iraqi War; four additional years later, in 1945, the baby girl in Nicaragua who would grow up to be famed model, activist, and rocker’s wife Bianca Jagger first opened her eyes to the world, and across the globe in various theatres of war, American forces liberated concentration camp victims in Wobbelin and Dachau; ten years from there, famed playwright Tennessee Williams won the Pulitzer for his Cat on a Hot Tin Roof; eight years ebola health illness disease plague war pestilencelater, in 1963, Berthold Seliger launched a rocket with three stages and a maximum flight altitude of more than 100 kilometres near Cuxhaven; nine years still further on, in 1972, Sunshine Mine workers died thanks to a fire broken out, and in that same year, Ahni Heinla, Skype co-developer was born, and J Edgar Hoover died; thirty-five years ago, a British nuclear submarine sunk an Argentine cruiser during the Falklands War; four years later, in 1986, the besiegued city of Chernobyl was evacuated six days after the reactor melted down; eleven more years down the pike, in 1997, the famed and important pedagogue, academic, and activist Paolo Freire breathed his last; a year onward, in 1998, the European Central Bank was founded in Brussels so as to execute the European Union’s financial policy; a year still further on, in 1999, the last days on Earth came to Robin Humphreys, the British scholar on Latin America; yet one more year down the line, in 2000, President Clinton made GPS technology available to all; nine years even later, in 2009, celebrated Feminist writer Marilyn French wrote her last words; two additional years from then, in 2011, the world finally had its Osama Bin Laden somewhere in Abbotabad, Pakistan; a year later, in 2012, a pastel version of the century’s most evocative piece of art, Munch’s The Scream, set a sale record when it auctioned off for $120 million; five years later, in 2015, the world lost Ruth Rendell, an English author, and last year, Afeni Shakur, music businesswoman, activist, and Black Panther, went on to her greater reward.