4.19.2017 Daily Links

               A Thought for the Day                    

The contemporary management proclivity to define every range of human response to stimuli or input as an average, while laudable in terms of prescribing and dosing populations with substances that members must purchase, promotes an at best dangerous fantasy about how such ambits of consequential development actually operate in nature, which is to say as a manifestation of variety and not of the ‘central tendency’ so beloved to marketers and accountants and profiteers, who see in the close definition of any multitude the opportunity to impose an orderly unity that in turn makes manufacturing rubrics and production protocols much easier to mandate even as it ‘unintentionally’ subverts evolutionary processes and guarantees a weakening of the underlying organisms’ adaptability to the inevitable fluctuations of environments that are always in one state of another of transformation, rather than ever expressing the fixed locus that hegemons, who hope to regularize their output and sales according to secure formula, concomitantly adore.

                    This Day in History                  

Venezuela on this date commemorates Beginning of the Independence Movement not quite two centuries back, as, around the planet, everyone has an opportunity to tip their hats to Bicycle Day, truly a technology apropos to the human condition now; in the early and arguably first really venal days of Rome’s imperial sway, two thousand and eighty-one years ago, a freed slave, Milichus, turned against the plotters with whom he was associating and gave the entire conspiracy to kill Nero away, resulting in an upcoming opportunity to play strings while the city incinerated itself; five hundred ninety-six years subsequently, in 531, Persian fighters in what is now Northern Syria defeated Byzantine troops at the Battle of Callinicum; MORE HERE

 

                  Quote of the Day                       
  • Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us.
    Controversy is only dreaded by the advocates of error.
    Mirth, and even cheerfulness, when employed as remedies in low spirits, are like hot water to a frozen limb.
  • Benjamin Rush
                   Doc of the Day                      
1. Charles Darwin, 1858.
2. Denton Loring Geyer, 1914.
3. Fidel Castro, 1961.

4. Octavio Paz, 1991.

Numero Uno“DeCandolle, in an eloquent passage, has declared that all nature is at war, one organism with another, or with external nature.  Seeing the contented face of nature, this may at first well be doubted; but reflection will inevitably prove it to be true.  The war, however, is not constant, but recurrent in a slight degree at short periods, and more severely at occasional more distant periods; and hence its effects are easily overlooked.  It is the doctrine of Malthus applied in most cases with tenfold force.  As in every climate there are seasons, for each of its inhabitants, of greater and less abundance, so all annually breed; and the moral restraint which in some small degree checks the increase of mankind is entirely lost.  Even slow-breeding mankind has doubled in twenty-five years; and if he could increase his food with greater ease, he would double in less time.  But for animals without artificial means, the amount of food for each species must, on an average, be constant, whereas the increase of all organisms tends to be geometrical, and in a vast majority of cases at an enormous ratio.  Suppose in a certain spot there are eight pairs of birds, and that only four pairs of them annually (including double hatches) rear only four young, and that these go on rearing their young at the same rate, then at the end of seven years (a short life, excluding violent deaths, for any bird) there will be 2048 birds, instead of the original sixteen.  As this increase is quite impossible, we must conclude either that birds do not rear nearly half their young, or that the average life of a bird is, from accident, not nearly seven years.  Both checks probably concur.  The same kind of calculation applied to all plants and animals affords results more or less striking, but in very few instances more striking than in man. MORE HERE

book hor2

SEARCHDAY
slavery history OR origins evolution resistance OR revolution abolition "color consciousness" "class consciousness" = 129 Citations.

book hor

 

 

                     Nearly Naked Links                  

Russian Revolution Lecture –  http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2017/04/10/lect-a10.html

Syria Tragedies and Effects – https://consortiumnews.com/2017/04/08/where-was-cias-pompeo-on-syria/

Syria Catastrophe – https://nplusonemag.com/online-only/online-only/the-syria-catastrophe/

MORE HERE

JOBSEVENTS

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Submissions

Ends on April 30, 2017
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    Ends on April 30, 2017

    • Our theme for the Summer issue, due out in June, is “Surrender” (see our website for more info).
    • We consider new and previously published work on the theme of healing (emotional, physical, spiritual, community, etc.).
    • Please tell us, if your piece was previously published and you own the rights, where and when it first appeared so we can note that.
    • We allow and encourage simultaneous submissions.
    • Please use our online submission portal to withdraw submissions. We really appreciate if you do this as soon as you know a submission is no longer available for publication.
    • We ask for no more than one creative nonfiction submission of up to 4,000 words: 12pt text; set in Courier, Arial, Times New Roman; double-spaced.
    • We believe a writer should have full control of their work, so all copyright and publication rights remain with the writer at all times. However, we appreciate exclusive publication rights for three months after the issue has been published to ensure maximum impact.
    • Reporting time is approximately one month. If you are a user of Duotrope, we appreciate you reporting your response times.
    • Contributors receive a free online issue in which their work appears, along with an issue for up to three persons (you’ll have to send us their email address), and our deepest appreciation.

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ORGLINK

Saker on Syria

An Information Clearing House post by a thoughtful political analyst, who discusses the tragedy unfolding in Syria currently: “The latest US cruise missile attack on the Syrian airbase is an extremely important event in so many ways that it is important to examine it in some detail.  I will try to do this today with the hope to be able to shed some light on a rather bizarre attack which will nevertheless have profound consequences.  But first, let’s begin by looking at what actually happened.”

WRISSBilingual Brain Research

An Aeon that explores the neurological virtues of knowing more than one language: “Despite all the fuss that has been made about the ‘bilingual advantage’, most researchers have moved on from the simplistic ‘is there an advantage or not’ debate. Rather than asking whether bilingualism per se confers a cognitive advantage, researchers are now taking a more nuanced approach by exploring the various aspects of bilingualism to better understand their individual effects.”

RECEV

Asking ‘Cui Bono?’ About Syria

A listserve analysis of some of the political motivations of the recent attacks:  “So who had something to gain? Well, half a dozen Syrian sects and militias who are fighting against Assad and against each other in the crazy civil war. Also their Sunni Arab allies, the Saudi and other Gulf Sheikhs. And Israel, of course. They all have an interest in arousing the civilized world against the Syrian dictator.

Simple logic.

A MILITARY act must have a political aim. As Carl von Clausewitz famously said 200 years ago: war is the continuation of politics by other means.”

GENISSIdeology, Revolution, ‘Timing’

A JHI look at a book that critically discusses the timing and lack of ubiquity of necessary revolutions: “As critical theory, Left-Wing Melancholia uses the history of socialism and Marxism over the last two hundred years and its defeat in 1989 in order to name the problem of the left today. As intellectual history, it may be found wanting, at least if one seeks in its tracing of left-wing culture some semblance of linearity. If, however, a reader is willing to follow, instead of context à la Skinner, or concept à la Koselleck, a feeling – then Left-Wing Melancholia will soothe, disturb, and offer an alternative: Traverso assures us that “the utopias of the twenty-first century still have to be invented” (119). Indeed, Traverso argues that Bensaïd “rediscovered a Marx for whom ‘revolutions never run on time’ and the hidden tradition of a historical materialism à contretemps, that is, as a theory of nonsynchronous times or non-contemporaneity” (217). Traverso’s own project could be read as part of this now-unearthed tradition.”