4.12.2017 Day in History

CC BY-SA by sludgegulper
CC BY-SA by sludgegulper

This date marks a key commemoration for human survival, a Global Day of Action on Military Spending, at the same time that in a more positive technological vein, today around the world is the International Day of Human Space flight and Yuri’s Night, while Russia, where Yuri Gargarin came into the world, celebrates Cosmonautics Day, and in a more social vein, this date also marks Equal Pay Day, the achievement of which could easily write the entire world’s economic doldrums as billions of women received a pay boost ; in the fair green lands of forest and river that now demarcates the United Kingdom a thousand three hundred and ninety years ago, the Northumbrian King Edwin converted to Christianity at the behest of the Bishop of York, as the former Roman and Pagan British Isles became more and more thoroughly Catholic; five hundred seventy-seven years subsequently, in 1204, Fourth Crusade knights and fighters that included many English adherents succeeded in battering down walls around Jerusalem, which they proceeded to occupy by the following afternoon; four hundred twenty-nine years later, in 1633, Galileo Galilei was convicted of heresy; one hundred forty-three years in the future from that, in 1776, North Carolinians came down on the side of liberty with the Halifax Resolution that authorized Continental Congress members to support independence; one hundred fifty-nine years back, a group of Pittsburgh iron workers formed themselves into a labor association that served as the forerunner for today’s United Steelworkers; three years henceforth, in 1861, Confederate cannoneers initiated a shooting war with the Union by firing on Federal forces at Fort Sumter; three years closer to today’s dawning, in 1864, the Fort Pillow massacre took place; thirteen years forward from that point, in 1877, six thousand miles to the Southeast, England, in advance of the ‘scramble for Africa’, asserted its dominance of the Southern part of the continent with the annexation of the Transvaal; twenty-three years onward from that conjunction, in 1900,  the baby girl uttered her first cry en route to a life as the iconic songwriter of solidarity, Florence Reese; a dozen years past that point, in 1912, the estimable activist and caretaker nurse Clara Barton breathed her last; four years afterwards, in 1916, the baby girl first cried out on her way to becoming supercentenarian, librarian and bestselling children’s author Beverly Cleary is born; twelve years more proximate to the present pass, in 1924, a baby boy was born whom fate had designated as a champion for organizing the National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) drivers into a union, as Chris Turner; a thousand ninety-five days in the future from that place in time, in 1927, halfway around the world in China, the treacherous Nationalist leader Shang Kai Scheck ordered the massacre of Chinese communists whom he had opportunistically made his allies in order to advance the Nationalist cause; seven years hence, in 1934, the Auto-Lite strike in Ohio resulted in a five-day long pitched battle between National Guard and Union advocates; three years subsequent to that mayhem, in 1937, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the National Labor Relations Act as a statutory set of protocols for permitting and regulating labor union organizing; seven years later, in 1944, the female infant opened her eyes who would rise as the estimable historian and critic Lisa Jardine; three hundred sixty-five days closer to today’s light and air, in 1945, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt breathed his last;  half a decade farther down the temporal path, in 1948, the baby male gave the first cry who would become the attorney and popular novelist Scott Turow; another three hundred and sixty-five days even closer to the current context, in 1950, a different baby boy looked around him who would become the estimable lyricist and rocker David Cassidy; five additional years past that exact moment, in 1955, the US Food and Drug Administration approved Jonas Salk’s Polio vaccine; two years still nearer to now, in 1957,  the baby boy cried out who would mature as the country songwriter and singer Vince Gill; four years yet later on, in 1961, the first homo sapiens to orbit the Earth, Yuri Gagarin, rode a Soviet rocket into space; three years hence, in 1964, a little baby girl entered our midst who would become the ever-popular songwriting and singing talent Amy Ray; half a dozen years further in the future, in 1970, a Soviet submarine sunk off Spain in the Bay of Biscay, and carried four nuclear torpedoes to the bottom of the ocean; a decade hence, in 1980, Samuel Doe became the first native African to lead Liberia when he overthrew the last in a line of African-American hegemons; a mere year later on, in 1981, the first ever space shuttle launch took place, inaugurating a multi-decade phase in U.S. extraterrestrial exploration; seven years onward in the direction of today, in 1988, the acclaimed and popular South African thinker and storyteller Alan Paton died; an additional year thereafter, in 1989, the activist and gadfly thinker who founded the Youth International Party, Abbie Hoffman, breathed his last; another three years more proximate to today’s light and air, in 1992, the Disney Corporation opened its EuroDisney operation in Paris, in many ways a monumental flop, albeit still in business; seven hundred thirty days henceforth, in 1994, the husband-wife law firm of Canter-Siegel sent out the first mass commercial Usenet Spam; half a decade further along the temporal road, in 1999, President Bill Clinton faced contempt-of-court sanctions  for providing “intentionally false statements” in a civil sexual harassment deposition; seven years subsequent to that day and time, in 2006, the stalwart activist and preacher of peace William Sloane Coffin lived out his final scene; yet another seven year period nearer to this moment in space and time, in 2013, U.S. chess master and writer Robert Byrne lived out his final day.