3.09.2017 Day in History

chinese emperor horse china asiaTwo thousand one hundred fifty-seven years ago, a seventh Han Dynasty emperor, Liu Che or Emperor Wu, took command of his dynasty at age fifteen, to rule for over five decades and cement the establishment of one of the world’s premier empires, replete with the still practical ideology of Confucianism; thirteen hundred eighty-five years prior to the present pass, Muhammad delivered his final sermon on Mount Arafat, three months before his final breath; three hundred seventy-eight years thereafter, in 1009, the first documentation of the existence of Lithuania appeared, in the records of a monastery at Quedlinburg; seven-hundred forty-one years before today, in a precursor to the origin of bourgeois development and ascendancy, the city of Augsburg became the first so-called Imperial Free City of the Holy Roman Empire; five hundred sixty-three years prior to this conjunction in time, a baby boy came into the world on the Italian Peninsula who would grow up as explorer and mapmaker Amerigo Vespucci; forty-seven years subsequent to that exact juncture, in 1500, a fleet under the leadership of Pedro Cabral left Lisbon en route to its ‘discovery’ of Brazil, a founding moment that Papal mandates guaranteed as a Portuguese colony; sixty-six years later, in 1566, Mary, Queen of Scots’ private secretary died at the hands of assassins in the Edinburgh castle, Holyroodhouse; one hundred ninety-seven years yet later on, in 1763, a baby boy shouted out en route to a life as the radical ‘paleo-liberal’ pamphleteer and politician and farmer, William Cobbett; seven hundred sixty-six days beyond that moment, in 1765, Voltaire’s campaign to exonerate his friend, Jean Calas, from the charge that he murdered his son ended in success, though the poor man was long dead after torture and execution by that point; a hundred ninety-three years before today’s instantiation, a male infant came into the world who would grow up as Amasa Leland Stanford, whose name a famous university now bears; seven years still nearer to now, in 1831, France’s authorities first created a French Foreign Legion, primarily to fight in the nation’s wars of plunder in Algeria and elsewhere in Africa; one hundred seventy-five years back, in United States v. the Amistad, the octopus animalSupreme Court ruled that the seizure for sale as slaves of the African ‘cargo’ of the famous ship was an illegal act; three hundred sixty-five days thereafter, in 1842, many years prior to United States control of the region, prospectors first discovered gold in California at Rancho San Francisco; half-a-decade hence, in 1847, the U.S. orchestrated a Vera Cruz amphibious landing that would lead, despite its inherent weaknesses, to the defeat of the Mexican State in the War with Mexico; thirty-two years subsequently, in 1879, a male child opened his eyes who would rise as the anarchist and International Workers of the World firebrand Carlo Tresca; thirteen years hence, in 1892, a baby girl was born who would go on to write and grow things as Vita Sackville-West; just three years past that conjunction in space-time, in 1895, the folklorist and roué, Leopold Sacher-Masoch, breathed his last scent of ‘fur;’ a decade and a half past that instant, in 1910, plus-or-minus 15,000 Pennsylvania coal miners went on strike under the leadership of the United Mineworkers, in a conflict that lasted fifteen months before police and business managed to crush the labor action; one year more along time’s arc, in 1911, Fresno California released I.W.W. free-speech fighters, including iconic organizer Frank Little; five years subsequently and exactly a century past, in 1916, Pancho Villa led approximately a mexico-Pancho_villa_horsebackregiment of his soldiers on an incursion over the New Mexico border; seven hundred thirty-one days henceforth, in 1918, a baby boy gave a first cry en route to a life as Mickey Spillane, a creator of noir thrillers among other narratives; another year onward toward today, in 1919, an overflow crowd of nearly a thousand workers and citizens came to watch a showing of The Blacklist a documentary film account of Rockefeller ‘interest’ depredations at Ludlow, Colorado five years before; fourteen years afterward, in 1933, Franklin Roosevelt submitted his first major ‘New Deal’ legislation, the Emergency Banking Act, to Congress, and ; a decade thereafter, 1943, the male infant who would grow into chess prodigy Bobby Fischer was born into the world; two years even closer to the here and now, in 1945, U.S. Army Air Force bombers delivered death from the air to Tokyo in such fiery intensity that as many as 150,000 people died, while a thousand miles South, Japanese operatives orchestrated a coup in Northern Indochina that replaced French administration temporarily with Japan’s managers; nine years after that juncture, in 1954, CBS News broadcast a Fred-Friendly-produced See It Now program on Joseph McCarthy that putatively contributed to the demise of

Cold War Poster
Cold War Poster

blatant anti-‘red’ witch-hunts; two years later to the day, in 1956, half a world away in Soviet Russia, troops repressed massive protests in Georgia against Russia’s ‘destalinization’ plans; three years beyond that, in 1959, a Barbie doll first went on store shelves as a representation of what being a woman supposedly meant; seven hundred thirty-one days further on, in 1961, again across the Atlantic and much of Europe’s continent in the Soviet Union, Sputnik 9 entered orbit with a human dummy, setting the stage for Russia’s manned space program; thirteen years still more proximate to this day and time, in 1974, the most massive construction project of Alaskan history began, an oil pipeline of nearly 800 miles, when completed, from Prudhoe Bay to Valdez; in a little studied but arguably centrally important event three years henceforth, in 1977, a hostage-taking siege that involved nearly a hundred-fifty people began in the District of Columbia as a result of an Islamic leader’s fury at the murder of his five children and a grandchild, which he believed had not received adequate investigation into the background and connections of the convicted perpetrators; a dozen years further

pfunked Deviant Art
pfunked Deviant Art

along, in 1989, anti-labor Eastern Airlines formally declared bankruptcy; two years farther along time’s highway, in 1991, massive protests against Slobodan Milosevic began in Yugoslavia as the country splintered and headed toward civil war; two years thereafter, in 1993, prolific British naval historian and public administration author, C. Northcote Parkinson, breathed his last; still another year past that, in 1994, iconic poet and writer and gadfly Charles Bukowski lived out his final scene; three years later, also in California, in 1997, the iconic rap artist whose name included the denotation the Notorious Big died at the hands of drive-by assassins in Los Angeles; another fourteen years in the direction of now, in 2011, establishment political journalist and insider reporter David S. Broder died.