2.27.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

Often enough, the ability to accomplish many things comes down to a willingness to forego standards and protocols and elect to make things up as one goes along, accepting that perfection stands in opposition to achievement when events cascade like a rushing waterfall.

Quote of the Day
“It was easy to present figures demonstrating the contrast between lead work in the United States under conditions of neglect and ignorance, and comparable work in England and Germany, under intelligent control. …It was impossible for me to believe that conditions in Europe could be worse than they were in the Polish section of Chicago, and in many Italian and Irish tenements, or that any workshops could be worse than some of those I had seen in our foreign quarters.”  Alice Hamilton
This Day in History

Godefroi1099 medieval catholic crusadesAround the world, today is Polar Bear Day; Roman co-emperors sixteen hundred thirty-five years ago issued edicts ‘requesting’ all citizens to covert to ‘trinitarian’ Christianity; forty-five years hence, in 425, the daughter-in-law of one of those imperial masters helped to found the University of Constantinople; four hundred fifty-five years back, England’s rulers and the Lords of the Congregation of Scotland validated the Treaty of Berwick to expel the French from Scotland; two hundred thirty-three years before the here and now, Parliament voted against further funding of war with America’s colonies; two hundred fourteen years prior to the present pass, the District of Columbia by law came under the direct jurisdiction of the U.S. Congress; six years later, in 1807, a baby boy was born who grew up as popular poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow; another half-decade afterward, in 1812, Manuel Belgrano first raised the flag of an independent Argentina, and Lord Byron delivered his first House-of-Lords speech, a defense of

"Abraham Lincoln O-74 by Gardner, 1863 bw" by Alexander Gardner
“Abraham Lincoln O-74 by Gardner, 1863 bw” by Alexander Gardner

Luddite protests in Nottinghamshire; one hundred fifty-five years ago, Abraham Lincoln delivered his controversial-but-acclaimed speech at Cooper Union in New York, which many credit for his subsequent election to President; three hundred sixty-six days subsequently, in 1861, Russian troops fired on Polish protesters who demanded independence from Moscow rule; two years further on, in 1863, a baby boy came into the world who would mature as philosopher and academic George Herbert Mead; another half-decade further on, in 1868, a female infant uttered her first cry en route to a life as environmental and occupational health scientist and advocate Alice Hamilton; two decades thereafter, in 1888, the baby male came along who would become popular and academic historian Arthur Schlesinger; a hundred eighteen years back, the baby girl who would become world-famous singer Marian Anderson was born; three years thereafter, in 1900, the British Labor Party came into existence; two years closer to the present, in 1902, the baby boy took a first breath who would grow up to win the Nobel Prize in literature as John Steinbeck; a decade hence to the day, in 1912, across the Atlantic in French Africa, a male child gave his first cry on his way to a life as acclaimed novelist Lawrence 8Durrell; ninety-four years before this precise moment, the International Working Union of Socialist Parties came into existence in opposition to the Bolshevik’s dominance in the Third International; a year later exactly, in 1922, the Supreme Court upheld female suffrage as promulgated by the Nineteenth Amendment; eleven years after that point, in 1933, the German Parliament building, the Reichstag, burned in a stepping-stone to Nazi dominance of German politics; just a year afterward, in 1934, across the Atlantic, two baby boys entered the world, the first to grow up as activist, lawyer, and author Ralph Nader, the second to become thinker and writer of Native American matters, N. Scott Momaday; seventy-nine years ago, Russian Nobellist Ivan Pavlov died; three years later, in 1939, the Supreme Court fulfilled its standard function of ruining the rights of workers with its declaration that sit-down strikes were illegal; three hundred sixty-five days beyond that, in 1940, two scientists at Berkeley discovered the radioactive isotope of Carbon that revolutionized the dating of ancient artifacts; two years nearer the present pass, in 1942, a girl infant took her first breath on the way to becoming, as Charlayne Hunter-Gault, the first African American to attend the University of Georgia, ultimately becoming a working journalist; a year beyond that juncture, in 1943, across the Atlantic in Germany, the Rosenstrasse protests against interdicting German Jews who had married German women unfolded; forty-two years back, American Indian Movement activists occupied Wounded

lance robotson flickr
lance robotson flickr

Knee, South Dakota in protest at ill-treatment and historical crimes against indigenous Americans; sixteen years later, in 1989, 3000 miles south in Venezuela, riots against repressive rule, the Caracazo upheaval, began against the government there; eleven years before this point, the initial report from John Jay College, commissioned by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, came out with its damning conclusions about sexual abuse on the part of priests, and Marxist economist and thinker Paul Sweezy took his final breath; four years after that day, in 2008, ‘conservative’ thinker William F. Buckley enjoyed his final day on Earth.

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
democracy participation "sine qua non" OR "necessary component" OR "central element" = 2,550,000 Results.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

http://www.theguardian.com    A Guardian news briefing about the most recent fascist outpourings from Wisconsin, in which the Reichsfuhrer Walker compares trade-unionists to Islamic State in Iraq & Syria killers, while saying his attacks on the former would prepare him to fight the latter, thereby at once conflating his ignorance of the world with his blustering viciousness at the same time that he illustrates the kinds of class warfare that many other articles have noted in regard to Wisconsin’s ‘right-to-work-for-nothing’ legislation, in stark contrast to a recent small-town news outlet in the ‘Cheese State’ that has thrived with a city-subsidy for its operations, much more so in keeping with Wisconsin’s social democratic traditions that the likes of Walker are arrogantly insisting that they will successfully subvert: “‘I want a commander-in-chief who will do everything in their power to make sure the threat from Islamic terrorists will not show up on our soil,” Walker said.  ‘If I can take on 100,000 protesters, I can do the same across the world.’ …While Walker has formed a committee to explore a presidential run, he has not declared his candidacy.  Yet he did not seek to a correct a questioner who asked him what he would do to take on Isis ‘should you become commander-in-chief.’ …He said he did not regret his statement.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

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Flash Fiction Online – We publish stories from 500 to 1,000 words in length.

They’re very short, but they are still stories. That means the best ones have strong, interesting characters, plots, and (to some extent, at least) settings.

Writer’s Digest Annual Writing Competition – Writer’s Digest has been shining a spotlight on up and coming writers in all genres through its Annual Writing Competition for more than 80 years. Enter our 84th Annual Writing Competition for your chance to win and have your work be seen by editors and agents! The winning entries of this writing contest will also be on display in the 84th Annual Writer’s Digest Competition CollectionEarly-Bird Entry Deadline: May 4, 2015

Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Awards = Whether you’re a professional writer, a part-time freelancer or a self-starting student, here’s your chance to enter the premier self-published competition exclusively for self-published books. Writer’s Digest hosts the 23rd annual self-published competition–the Annual Self-Published Book Awards. This self-published competition, co-sponsored by Book Marketing Works, LLC spotlights today’s self-published works and honors self-published authors.

Early-Bird Deadline: April 1, 2015

PHOEBE CONTESTS – Deadline March 1, 2015. Accepting submissions for the annual fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry contests. $17 ENTRY FEE. Fiction limited to 5,000 words. Prize $850 and publication in Phoebe 44.2 (online issue). 
Poetry limited to four poems and ten pages. Prize $850 and publication. Creative fiction limited to 5,000 words. Prize $850 and publication.

PRIME NUMBER MAGAZINE AWARD FOR POETRY – Deadline March 31, 2015. Submit one unpublished poem, no more than three pages. First Prize: $1000 plus publication in Prime Number Magazine. Second Prize: $250 plus publication in Prime Number Magazine. Third Prize: Publication in Prime Number Magazine. $15 ENTRY FEE.
pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

– The Virginian-Pilot : Editor-Special Sections (Norfolk-VA) – 02/13/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8967

– Reading Eagle : Reporter (Reading-PA) – 02/17/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8968

– Reading Eagle : Business writer (Reading-PA) – 02/17/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8969

– Journalismnext.com : test (Windsor-CA) – 02/18/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8971

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

8Commemorating a Socialist Leader 

A Democratic Socialists of America posting that commemorates  the life and work of a very influential socialist leader: “He had another best-seller in 1972 with the unlikely title of Socialism, which sold over 100,000 copies in paperback and influenced many readers with its argument that the “real Karl Marx” was a radical democrat, not a would-be dictator. His last book, Socialism: Past and Future, came out shortly before his death.  He was an editor of Dissent, a commentator on National Public Radio, a frequent contributor to leading opinion magazines like the Nation and the New Republic.  As a public intellectual and a moral tribune, in the 1970s and 1980s, he had few equals on the left, or indeed across the political spectrum.  Harrington, Senator Ted Kennedy would write, “has made more Americans more uncomfortable for more good reasons than any other person I know.””

Mayor Shift in Chicago

An In These Times article that introduces readers to a mayoral race that encapsulates the social and economic tensions alive today: “It’s widely accepted that money and influence rule politics. But yesterday, all Emanuel’s money and connections didn’t snag him a victory. Recent moves like raising the minimum wage, apologizing to victims of police torture and protecting single-room-occupancy affordable housing did not persuade Chicagoans alienated by Emanuel’s closing of public schools and mental health clinics, slashing of city jobs and services, attacking teachers and patronizing parents.”

 

"Film strip" by Bart from New Orleans, Louisiana, Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
“Film strip” by Bart from New Orleans, Louisiana

Film Offerings from Social Perspective

A useful World Socialist Web Site article that reviews, critically at times, the offerings of a  Berlin film festival “This is the fourth in a series of articles on the recent Berlin international film festival, the Berlinale, held February 5-15, 2015. The first part was posted February 19, the second part February 21 and the third part February 25. …

….

Freedom of artistic expression, the film’s central focus, while certainly important, is treated as separate from questions of social inequality and poverty. The isolated, abstract manner in which the struggle for “freedom” is addressed has allowed the film to gain some dubious and even despicable admirers.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

 

 

Anti-war and protest posters: the Political Poster Workshop at the University of California, Berkeley: Peace now (circa 1970) Penn State Special Collection
Anti-war and protest posters: the Political Poster Workshop at the University of California, Berkeley

Arts Funding Social Practices

An Inside Philanthropy posting about arts funding that benefits from social engagement: “Social practice has been defined by the Los Angeles Times as “art that requires the engagement and participation of its audience.” Now, if your initial reaction is, “How’s that any different than a creative writing workshop or an interactive art exhibit?” we won’t fault you for your perfectly valid response. But the concept of social practice has some seemingly innocuous quirks that make it stand apart, while simultaneously borrowing from other movements and genres.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Amusing Internet Anachronism

A Poynter piece that discusses a hilariously outdated humbug view of the internet, particularly poignant because each point was proved wrong: “So why did Stoll so dramatically misjudge the dynamism of the Internet and its potential to produce innovations?

Hard to say: Stoll gave no reply to several entreaties I sent him while I researched the 1995 book.

But clearly, his timing was exquisitely bad. Major change was afoot in the digital world at the time he wrote and he minimized the vitality that defined the then-emergent digital world.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

shah jahan mosque
shah jahan mosque

Islamophobia Countered with Love

An Al Jazeera article that describes a mosque in Texas that met the attack with disarming kindness: “When Facebook user Barour Bob Hammer said, “I don’t know why, but I suddenly feel like throwing severed pig-heads at every Muslim on my path,” Zahid replied: “We are sorry you feel that way. Perhaps we can one day settle our differences and move forward towards a more perfect Union and World. Thank you, sir.”

Oso Osorio, another Facebook user, also focused on the Muslim prohibition on eating pork, writing, “I can donate some bacon sandwiches and a bible if you all want!”

Zahid accepted the offer: “We would gladly take you donation. Knowledge is something we can never have enough of. And we may feed the homeless in our area with the sandwiches. You are such a thoughtful human being!”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Archeologists’ Main Tool Anniversary

A Smithsonian posting about carbon dating, a technology that revolutionized the study of the past: “February 27, 2015, marks the 75th anniversary of the discovery of the radioactive carbon isotope, carbon-14, by Martin Kamen and Sam Ruben at the University of California Radiation Laboratory. Willard Libby would later win a Nobel Prize for developing a method for dating archaeological materials using carbon-14. To celebrate, we chat with Modern Physics curator Roger Sherman about two carbon-14 dating apparatuses in our collection, one from Libby himself and another from Charles Tucek, who went into business dating carbon-14 samples for archaeologists.”

2.25.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

Lethargy and a sense of powerlessness can overtake us when we do not allow ourselves to properly utilize the secret, seething power of anger that exists inside all of us who’ve had to battle for greater justice, a force it behooves us all to take seriously, harness, and channel into useful, life expanding goals.

Quote of the Day
  • I don’t ask for your pity, but just for your understanding—not even that—no. Just for your recognition of me in you, and the enemy, time, in us all.

– Tennessee Williams

This Day in History
By Sun Long (孫隆) and Chen Lu (陳錄)
By Sun Long (孫隆) and Chen Lu (陳錄)

Today is Kitano Baika-sai or “Plum Blossom Festival” in Japan; in the year 138, the Roman emperor Hadrian adopts Antoninus Pius, effectively making him his successor; in 1663 – Pierre Antoine Motteux, French-English playwright was born; in 1723Christopher Wren, the English architect who designed St Paul’s Cathedral, drew his last breath;  in 1778 José de San Martín, Argentinian general and politician, and 1st President of Peru, first drew breath;  in 1797  Colonel William Tate and his force of 1000–1500 soldiers surrender after the Last invasion of Britain; in 1841, the baby who would grow up to be Pierre-Auguste Renoir, renowned French painter and sculptor, first drew breath; in 1848 the Provisional government in revolutionary France,

Renoir - La Liseuse
Renoir – La Liseuse

by Louis Blanc‘s motion, guarantees workers’ rights; in 1852 the Irish poet Thomas Moore died; in 1866, Miners in Calaveras County, California, discover what is now called the Calaveras Skull – human remains that supposedly indicated that man, mastodons, and elephants had co-existed; in 1897, Peter Llewelyn Davies, who would soon become the inspiration behind the character Peter Pan, and later on an English publisher, was born;  in 1901J. P. Morgan incorporates the United States Steel Corporation; in 1917, the child who would become Anthony Burgess, English author, gave his first cry; in 1921Tbilisi, capital of the Democratic Republic of Georgia, is occupied by Bolshevist Russia; in 1943 the child who would become a member of the most famous musical quartet in history,  George Harrison, was born; in in 1945, during World War II, Turkey declares war on Germany; in 1948, the Communist Party takes control of government in Czechoslovakia and the period of the Third Republic ends; in 1980, the government of Suriname is overthrown by a military coup which is initiated by the bombarding of the police station from an army ship off the coast of the nation’s capital,Paramaribo; in 1983, famed American playwright Tennessee Williams died. (from Wikipedia)

 

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"critique of pacifism" OR pacifism + pathology OR fight the power + nonviolence + results OR "social justice + struggle" = 80,600 Results.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

Protecting Justice through Net Neutrality

A Guardian Media post that analyzes the importance of upholding Net Neutrality, which is a good effort to fix a problem, but not nearly enough if what we want is a better world :  “The net neutrality rules proposed by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler would not only protect those organizing for change, but also help close long-standing equity and wealth gaps that disadvantage communities of color and America’s poor. From ensuring access to quality education and health care, to strengthening opportunity for independent artists and small businesses, equal representation in a digital economy and 21st century democracy demands net neutrality protections.

Despite the clear benefit that net neutrality protections offer to under-served communities, Internet Service Providers like Comcast and Verizon have continued to propagate myths in an effort to thwart the fight for an open internet. Fortunately for the American people, net neutrality remains on the table at the FCC, despite the industry’s best efforts.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

St. Anthony Messenger is a national Roman Catholic family magazine published by the Franciscan Friars (O.F.M.) of St. John the Baptist Province, Cincinnati, Ohio in the United States, with the explicit ecclesiastical approval of the Archbishop of Cincinnati. 20 cents per word.

AIR & SPACE/Smithsonian is a general interest magazine about flight. Its goal is to show readers, both the knowledgeable and the novice, facets of the enterprise of flight that they are unlikely to encounter elsewhere. The emphasis is on the human rather than the technological, on the ideas behind events, rather than a simple recounting of details. Pays well.

Read more: http://www.airspacemag.com/contact-us/asm-submission-guidelines/?no-ist#ixzz3SsKyBmSS

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Zócalo Group is a social, digital and word of mouth marketing agency focused on making our clients the most recommended brands in their categories. We are looking for a freelance Copywriter to help us deliver insightful creative ideas and concepts to our clients.  Our ideal candidate will have a proven track record of developing concepts and drafting engaging copy and content solutions that achieve client marketing objectives.

The Northern Wyoming Daily News, a 5-day per week,  family-owned newspaper located in Worland, WY near the Bighorn Mountains, in the Rocky Mountain West is seeking a community-focused reporter who is unafraid to dig into the local news scene. The ideal candidate will be creative, motivated and committed to excellent writing and accurate reporting. We are looking for someone who cares about community journalism.

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

Symposium on Environment and Nuclear Free Planet

An EcoWatch posting that announces an event all who care about the environment can check out to great benefit: “The great Dr. Helen Caldicott will present a major symposium on a “Nuclear-Free Planet” in New York City at the New York Academy of Medicine from Feb. 28 – March 1. The gathering will feature some of the world’s most important speakers and thinkers on the issue of nuclear war and how to prevent it.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

 

writing students class kchinchester Flickr
writing students class kchinchester Flickr

Underpaying Adjuncts Harmful to All

A Truth Out article that contextualizes the recent professors’ walkout, while warning of the overall negative consequences of shortchanging these essential members of academia: “A national 2012 study found that the median salary per course for adjuncts was $2,700; teaching four courses is considered full-time. Only 51 percent of adjunct faculty members were eligible for employee benefits. Furthermore, adjuncts rarely get raises or promotions.

Economics drives this widespread practice. When higher education institutions receive less state funding, they may increase tuition to provide revenue. But there is a limit to the tuition level the marketplace will bear. As the institutions struggle to balance their books, one way to reduce costs is to hire adjuncts rather than tenure-track faculty who make much higher salaries. “

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

headphonesPodcasting Casting Wider Net

A Digital Content Net article that describes expanding markets and uses for podcasting, through a famous media site: “Podcasting is definitely making a comeback. But like so many things digital, podcasting isn’t a one-size-fits-all opportunity. While many individuals and organizations are posting podcasts on their own sites, others opt to participate in podcast networks. The Associated Press is taking the latter route,  getting into the resurgent podcasting game while remaining true to its brand: a trusted source of independent news and information licensed by media outlets of all kinds.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

"Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing" por W. Müller Wikimedia Commons
“Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing” por W. Müller Wikimedia Commons

Marijuana Battles

A Hill posting that discusses ongoing battles in the capital’s marijuana legislation, and what this means for the rest of the nation: “GOP members of Congress leveled threats of jail time against Washington, D.C.’s leaders Wednesday, with neither side appearing ready to back down in an intensifying battle over the District’s move to legalize marijuana.

Hours before a statute was to take effect at 12:01 a.m. on Thursday, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser (D) pledged that the city’s plans to allow recreational pot use would proceed over vehement objections from Republicans, including House Oversight Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Mongolia Past and Present

A fascinating glimpse from Geopolitical Monitor into the realities behind this remote and resource-rich land: “Today Mongolia presents a curious picture. In a region of autocracies it is still a democracy two decades on from the 1990 communist collapse. Despite sitting on vast quantities of untapped mineral wealth it has not succumbed to the ‘resource curse’ yet. Mongolia was also one of the world’s fastest growing economies until recent times, with high growth rates reported in 2012 and 2013. Driven by a number of massive mining projects, foreign direct investment has been transforming its post-communist economy.”

2.26.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

Furthering the human project more depends on the ability to give generously even when others did not give in the past, than in lording one’s thrift or toughness over others who seek a helping hand.

Quote of the Day
potato diggersYou have enemies? Why, it is the story of every man who has done a great deed or created a new idea….Social problems overstep frontiers. The sores of the human race, those great sores which cover the globe, do not halt at the red or blue lines traced upon the map – Victor Hugo

 

This Day in History

 On this day in 1564, the baby boy who would become Christopher Marlowe, the English playwright, first drew breath; VIOLINin 1770Giuseppe Tartini, Italian violinist and composer, drew his last breath; in 1802Victor Hugo, French author, poet, and playwright, came into the world; in 1857, the infant who would grow up to be French psychologist Émile Coué, came into being; in 1876Japan and Korea signed a treaty granting Japanese citizens extraterritoriality rights, opening three ports to Japanese trade, and ending Korea’s status as a tributary state of Qing dynasty China; in 1893, I. A. Richards, an English educator and critic who was considered one of the founders of the contemporary study of literature in English, was born; sixteen years later, the general public at the Palace Theatre in London saw the first successful color motion picture process, called Kinemacolor; in 1919, President Woodrow Wilson signed an act of the U.S. Mormon_row_barn_grand_teton_national_parkCongress establishing most of the Grand Canyon as a United States National Park – the Grand Canyon National Park; only ten years later, President Calvin Coolidge signed an Executive Order establishing the 96,000 acre Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming; in 1932, the extremely talented Johnny Cash, American singer-songwriter, guitarist, and actor was born; in 1969, Karl Jaspers, the eminent German psychiatrist, met his end; in 1993, the World Trade Center suffered its first bombing, when a truck bomb parked below the North Tower of the World Trade Center exploded, killing six and injuring over a thousand; in 1994, the world lost Bill Hicks, a brilliant American comedian and singer; in 2012 Trayvon Martin, an American homicide victim whose crime went unpunished, met his early end. (from Wikipedia)

 

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"human species" biology family = 415,000 Results.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

Municipal Broadband Success

A Government Executive article that speaks of a positive development for two cities in southern Appalachia in regards to community access to internet: “Both cities have developed their own local high-speed connectivity broadband networks and have been cited as success stories of local governments taking direct action to provide faster Internet speeds for residents and to encourage economic development.

“By its action today, the FCC has empowered local North Carolina communities to do whatever it takes for all of our citizens to realize the benefits of access to essential Gigabit infrastructure in our beautiful state,” according to an official statement from Wilson’s city government. “All possibilities are now on the table, whether through public-private partnerships or municipally-owned broadband networks, to ensure North Carolina’s businesses and residents remain competitive in the global economy.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

Story|Houston (est. 2013), an online literary journal published quarterly for the Houston community and beyond, is accepting entertaining short fiction and creative nonfiction stories for its Spring 2015 issue. 

Cricket Magazine Group is accepting article pitches for the February 2015 issue of DIG magazine. Published nine times yearly, DIG is an archaeology magazine for kids, ages 9-14. 

Parenting Blog pays $100 per story –  Sumitha Bhandarkar, the founder and primary blogger of A Fine Parent blog (afineparent.com) wants to add more diverse voices on important parenting issues and is now inviting writers to contribute articles. She opens a short reading period before the start of each month to curate stories for a new parenting theme. 

Debuting in spring 2015, Hakai Magazine will be an online publication investigating science and society in our coastal environments. The grassroots magazine is seeking experienced freelance writers to explore the connections between the ocean, land, and human societies via long- and short-form journalism, illustration, photography, and video. The editorial focus is to encourage people and communities to contemplate their relationship with coastal ecosystems—from various perspectives— daily. 

Canadian Women in the Literary Arts (CWILA) has reopened for submissions and is inviting Canadian women writers to submit non-fiction essays (under 4K words) on any subject pertaining to literary arts. 

Listings taken from: http://writingcareer.com/
Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Alternate Roots in Atlanta GA is still looking for a Communications Manager – will design and implement the communications strategy for all internal and external communications, website, and public relations messages and collateral material to consistently articulate and advance the institutional vision and mission of Alternate ROOTS. The Communications Manager will ensure that Alternate ROOTS is viewed as a primary source, disseminator, and conduit of information within the field of arts and social justice. 

Role

The Communications Manager will design and implement the communications strategy for all internal and external communications, website, and public relations messages and collateral material to consistently articulate and advance the institutional vision and mission of Alternate ROOTS. The Communications Manager will ensure that Alternate ROOTS is viewed as a primary source, disseminator, and conduit of information within the field of arts and social justice.

 The Communications Manager reports to the Executive Director, manages the Communications Team, and works closely with other staff within the organization as the communications partner on a variety of strategic initiatives.

Please submit resume and cover letter to communications@alternateroots.org by 4:00 pm on March 6, 2015. Alternate ROOTS is an equal opportunity employer. If you have any questions, please email communications@alternateroots.org.

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

By Allan Ajifo
By Allan Ajifo

Recapturing a Youthful Brain

A fascinating Aeon article that discusses research which seeks to use SOP ‘better living through chemistry’ means to bring youthful elasticity to adult brains, initially for legitimate medical reasons but quickly a clever reader can imagine a context where the market can provide consumers with  a ‘cosmetically enhanced’ brain: “The possibility of reawakening our youthful, receptive brains has piqued a lot of interest among educators, therapists, and those in search of expanded experience or thought. I might be able to immerse myself in music lessons and absorb them more effectively. Others might disable the plasticity brakes before a trip abroad, quickly learning a new language. Still others might wish to tweak an imperfect golf swing. The implications are more profound for people with autism spectrum disorders, mental illness and physical disabilities: re‑opening critical periods could help us rebuild the physical structures of our brains, erasing bad connections and wiring them anew.”

RosaparksVoices of African American Women

A Library of Congress posting at the end of Black History Month that brings us wonderful resources that preserve for posterity the voices, stories, and struggles of African American women, from the grimmest days of slavery to the present moment: “One reason I became interested in the study of folklife was to learn through the voices of peoples who are often under-represented in history. As this is the end of February, African American History Month, and March is Women’s History Month, it seems a good time to take a look at what African American women have to teach us. The primary-source collections of the American Folklife Center, and the Library as a whole, provide wonderful ways to experience history as presented by African American women.

Online video and audio recordings provide the readiest opportunities to hear the women’s voices, and the examples that go back the furthest are recordings made of former slaves. In a previous Folklife Today post at this link, Stephen Winick presented a moving recording of Alberta Bradford and Becky Elzy, two former slaves from Louisiana, singing “Free at Last.””

Standing for Medical Choice

A Global Research posting that introduces readers to a physician others who care about this issue must take note, a courageous doctor who refuses to bow down to legal coercion that seeks to challenge what he has learned firsthand as a pediatrician: “Dr. Paul stated that this bill, as it is written, is “a travesty.” He stated: “We need to protect our children and preserve the right for freedom of choice, and the right to give informed consent when your child is about to get a vaccine.” In testimony before the Senate Committee, Dr. Paul stated that he does not give every vaccine to every child in his practice, and as a result, he has over 1000 children in his practice over the age of 3, and NONE of them have autism. The rest of the country is seeing a rate of about one out of 50 children on the autism spectrum. He states that the “science is not settled” linking too many vaccines to autism, and that doctors like himself should not be coerced by bills like this one proposed in Oregon to give up the right to informed consent in regards to vaccines.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

 

hector gomez
hector gomez

Commenting on Comments

A GigaOm article that analyzes the fate of comments on site, an offering to readers that seems to be suffering obsolescence at the same time that other prominent news sites are going the opposite route and actively promoting engaged readership: “Unlike many of the other organizations that have chosen to kill off their comments — including Re/code, Reuters and The Week — the New York Times apparently doesn’t believe that social-media networks such as Twitter and Facebook can take the place of reader interaction directly on the Times site. As I’ve tried to argue before, the fact that those tools exist should be seen as an addition to traditional commenting, not a replacement for it. In addition to the Times, sites like Quartz, Medium and Gawker have been experimenting with ways of improving comments rather than killing them.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Seeking Profit from Video Platform

A Media Post brief that discusses ways that a popular video sharing site seeks to turn a profit, which is yet another ongoing issue for media dissemination in the digital age: “Google’s YouTube still doesn’t make a profit, although it pulled in a big $4 billion in revenue in 2014, up from $3 billion in 2013.

Which begs the question: Would a traditional TV network/station group survive investor criticism with these kind of bottom-line results?”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory flickr
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory flickr

Nuclear Worker Afflictions

An In These Times articles that describes the harrowing health effects on nuclear plant workers who have not experienced proper worker protection, and the legal actions available to them: “To that end, in November of last year Local 598, Hanford Challenge and Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility filed a 90-day notice of intent to sue the U.S. D.O.E. and WRPS, which manages work at the Hanford tank farms for the D.O.E., over violations of the Federal Resources and Recovery Act that endanger workers’ health.

“Workers are not being taken care of,” said Nicacio. “Workers are having health issues and D.O.E. does not want to acknowledge those issues,” he said. “We’re here to make sure we do our part to ensure that they’re going to take some action.””

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Financial Parasitism Holds Up System

A World Socialist Web Site posting that denotes the true character of the financial sector: “All of the major reports on the state of the world economy in the recent period—from the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development—have downgraded previous growth projections and warned that the economy is increasingly characterised by a vicious cycle.

Investment has fallen to historic lows because of the lack of demand and profit opportunities. The decline in investment is leading, in turn, to a further decline in demand and profit expectations.

Notwithstanding these powerful trends, the stock markets continue to power on, providing a graphic demonstration of the degree to which the accumulation of wealth by global financial elites has become divorced from the actual process of production.”

2.23.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

Paradoxically, science both induces and reveals the cures for such social pathologies as lack of exercise, obesity, and other health issues that plague modern humans. The deeper issue is about understanding the connection between the things that we take for granted that are presented to us by science, technology, and business, and the things we want in our lives, such as love, health, and vitality. 

Quote of the Day
pies“My friend is being attacked, threatened, cyber-bullied and harassed because of her recent critical work in exposing Monsanto’s glyphosate in popular food products that children eat. Unfortunately, I know all too well what’s happening to her because it’s happening to me too. This is why I think it’s absolutely critical for us to stick together and not be afraid to tell the truth. These bullies want to intimidate us into submission. They want us to be too scared to write, investigate and share our findings. So scared, that we quit. Well, we cannot let that happen.” Vani Hari, food activist
This Day in History

 Today the festival of Terminalia held in honor of Terminus occurred in Ancient Rome, and Red Army Day was observed in Soviet Russia; Gutenberg_Bible_scanin 1455 the publication of the Gutenberg Bible, the first Western book printed with movable type, took place;  in 1633Samuel Pepys, English politician, first drew breath;  fifty two years later, the baby boy who would grow up to become prominent German-English composer George Frideric Handel came into being; in 1752Simon Knéfacz, Croatian monk and author was born; in 1821,  the renown English poet John Keats drew his last breath; in 1836 the Battle of the Alamo begins in San Antonio, Texas, and a few years later, in 1847, American troops during the Mexican American War, under future president General Zachary Taylor defeat Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna; in 1883Karl Jaspers, a German citizen who grew to become a philosopher, drew his first breath: in 1898  Émile Zola is imprisoned in France after writing “J’accuse“, a letter accusing the French government of antisemitism and wrongfully 515px-Guantanamoimprisoning Captain Alfred Dreyfus; in 1903Cuba leases Guantánamo Bay to the United States “in perpetuity”; in 1917, the first demonstrations that define the beginning of the February Revolution in Saint Petersburg, Russia take place; in 1927, German theoretical physicist Werner Heisenberg wrote a letter to fellow physicist Wolfgang Pauli, in which he described his uncertainty principle for the first time; Nellie Melba, Australian soprano, died in 1931; in 1954, the first mass inoculation of children against polio with the Salk vaccine begins in Pittsburgh; in 1974 the Symbionese Liberation Army demands $4 million more to release kidnap victim Patty Hearst; in 2008, Douglas Fraser, Scottish-American union leader met his end.  (from Wikipedia)

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"msg fat induced mice" OR "food additives" + obesity OR "ingredients with msg" OR "hidden msg" OR "obesity epidemic" = 372,000 Results.

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Fighting Alienation to Fight Drug Addiction

A Yes magazine article that examines Portuguese developments of programs and protocols dramatically to lower addiction rates, by increasing positive social relationships, community connection, participatory democracy, and other necessary elements of fighting alienation: “Professor Peter Cohen argues that human beings have a Addictiondependence1deep need to bond and form connections. It’s how we get our satisfaction. If we can’t connect with each other, we will connect with anything we can find—the whirr of a roulette wheel or the prick of a syringe. He says we should stop talking about ‘addiction’ altogether, and instead call it ‘bonding.’ A heroin addict has bonded with heroin because she couldn’t bond as fully with anything else.

So the opposite of addiction is not sobriety. It is human connection.

When I learned all this, I found it slowly persuading me, but I still couldn’t shake off a nagging doubt. Are these scientists saying chemical hooks make no difference? It was explained to me—you can become addicted to gambling, and nobody thinks you inject a pack of cards into your veins. You can have all the addiction, and none of the chemical hooks. I went to a Gamblers’ Anonymous meeting in Las Vegas (with the permission of everyone present, who knew I was there to observe) and they were as plainly addicted as the cocaine and heroin addicts I have known in my life. Yet there are no chemical hooks on a craps table.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

Snowbound Chapbook Award from Tupelo Press

Deadline February 28. The Snowbound Chapbook Awardincludes a cash award of $1,000, publication by Tupelo Press, 25 copies of your book, a book launch, and national distribution with energetic publicity and promotion. The final judge for this year’s contest is Lia Purpura. All finalists will be considered for publication. Results announced in late spring 2015.

42 Miles Press Poetry Award

Deadline: March 1. Indiana University South Bend’s 42 Miles Press Poetry Award will be given to an emerging or established poet for a book-length manuscript of at least 48 pages. Winner receives $1,000, 50 copies, and will be invited to give a reading in South Bend. David Dodd Lee, Series Editor, will judge. Entry fee: $25 made payable to Indiana University.

Deadline Extended: Robert Frost Foundation Poetry Award

Deadline extended to March 1. The Robert Frost Foundation welcomes poems in the spirit of Robert Frost for its Annual Award. The winner will receive $1,000 and the opportunity to read at a Frost Foundation event. Up to ten runners-up will be shortlisted at the discretion of the judge.

 

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Instructor in Wiscasset, Maine – Chewonki Semester School is a unique semester-length school program of the Chewonki Foundation in Wiscasset, Maine. Each fall and spring, we offer a small number of high school juniors the chance to live and work on a 400-acre saltwater peninsula with the goal of exploring the interrelationship between people and the natural world through challenging courses in natural science, environmental issues, ethics, art, history, mathematics, languages, literature and writing.

Writer/Reporter, ASC Communications – Chicago, IL

Editorial Writer
Newsday Media Group
Melville, NY

Editorial Manager
Advantage Media Group
Charleston, SC

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

typewriter3Striking Back Against Student Loan Fraud

A Guardian article that discusses a vibrant movement that defiantly turns against predatory loan practices, and which could change the face of the entire student loan fiasco: “The picture of Corinthian is similar to the subprime lending practices that led to the 2008 housing market crash and financial crisis. The school allegedly targeted subprime borrowers with bad credit, low incomes, and low financial literacy, promising them an education that would help them punch their ticket into the middle class.

It filled its coffers with federal loans, but when those dried up, it was on the verge of collapse – a “too big to fail” moment. The government released $35m in order to keep the school from going under.

“They gave them the opportunity to make money because they failed,” Bowers says. “We’re the ones facing all the consequences.”

Commemorating Forced Exile in LA

A Latino POV posting that describes a play that commemorates an important but painful historical chapter in Latinos history: “The play “Chavez Ravine” is once again being performed by the Latino-based theatrical group Culture Clash. This live theatrical performance provides a great historical snapshot and artistic depiction of 1950’s Los Angeles and particularly its portrayal of one of the oldest Mexican-American communities that once existed within the heart of the city. As such, this play creatively combines an ethnic format with a content that possesses both political and historical substance. “

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

 

pens Keith Williamson Flickr
pens Keith Williamson Flickr

Important Federal Resource

A Library of Congress posting about different archiving projects that can be useful to all researchers: ““Harvesting born-digital agency web content, making it discoverable, building digital collections, and preserving them for future generations all fulfill the Government Publishing Office’s mission, Keeping America Informed. We are pleased to be partnering with the Library and NARA to get this important project off the ground. Networking and collaboration will be key to our success government-wide.” – Mary Alice Baish, Superintendent of Documents, Government Publishing Office.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

 

Braun HF 1
Braun HF 1

Media Consumption and Culture

A Telesur article that analyzes the purpose and the bread-and-circuses nature of entertainment, and the psychic, physical, and social consequences of this dependence and propagation of TV culture: “Entertainment-culture is gaining momentum worldwide. Throughout the last twenty years, more and more individuals around the globe have been fully metabolized into the psychosphere of technological-spectacle: TV, Hollywood, video games, sporting events, and so forth. For many, these activities represent leisure-time and a way to connect with the larger, outside world. However, this rapidly spreading global phenomena of technological-spectacle is having a tremendously negative impact on society’s collective ideologies, culture, and overall health. Most importantly, the rest of the world is now consuming media at the same pace, and in the same forms, as those living in the United States.”

 

RECENT HAPPENINGS

Ukraine Misrepresentations and Lies

A Counter Current article that discusses the ways that a popular website misrepresents what is occuring in Ukraine, as well as some reasons for the lies : “Dailykos is not America’s disease; it’s a symptom of America’s disease. The source of this disease goes much deeper. The source is America’s worship of power (in any form, “the Almighty,” or “the mainstream,” or “the successful,” or “the Establishment”) rather than of truth (“science,” “honesty,” etc.). And America isn’t unique in having this disease. Instead, this disease is normal; so, it’s not even being called a “disease.” But maybe now, it’s becoming terminal.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

Creative Commons/DonkeyHotey.
Creative Commons/DonkeyHotey.

For Profit Colleges Still Thriving

A Hechinger Report article that discusses the increasing enrollment in for profit colleges, and the reasons why: “The number of students at public community colleges has been declining for two good reasons. The first is demographics. Thanks to declining birth rates more than 20 years ago, the population of high school graduates has been steadily shrinking since 2010. That’s a smaller pool for colleges to draw from. The second is the economy. As businesses rebounded after the 2008 recession, so did hiring. Students older than 24 years, in particular, who make up almost 40 percent of community college students, are finding jobs and leaving school.”

2.20.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

No matter how far-fetched the notion might seem, the social reality of every society today is that those on the bottom could readily, in the course of a few short years or less, take the helms of their nations and empires and colonies and so forth; all that this would require is coming-to-terms with the real relationships that govern affairs, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, organizing with other underlings to assume command—a continuing possibility that, unluckily, may only persist for another decade or so, till the complete automation of production and destruction puts final control in the hands of our so-called ‘leaders’ and the plutocrats who stand behind these puppets.

Quote of the Day
“It is often by a trivial, even an anecdotal decision, that we direct our activities into a certain channel, and thus determine which of the potential expressions of our individuality become manifest.  Usually we know nothing of the ultimate orientation or of the outlet toward which we travel, and the stream sweeps us to a formula of life from which there is no returning.  Every decision is like a murder, and our march forward is over the stillborn bodies of all our possible selves that will never be.”  Rene Dubos
This Day in History

Internationally, today is the World Day of Social Justice; Norway five hundred forty-three years ago proffered two islands to Scotland as a dowry payment for Denmark’s Princess Margaret; a swashbuckling French explorer three hundred thirty

Thomas Hawk - flickr
Thomas Hawk – flickr

years back led an expedition that founded Fort St. Louis in Matagorda Bay, proferring France some reason for claiming Texas as its own; two hundred twenty three years before today, President George Washington established the Post Office Department when he signed the Postal Service Act; eighteen decades prior to the present pass, a massive earthquake leveled the city of Concepcion, in Chile; one hundred sixty-nine years ago, Polish rebels battled for independence in Krakow; one hundred forty-three years back, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan first opened its doors; exactly three hundred sixty-six days hence, in 1873, the University of California opened its first Medical School on the other side of the North American landmass in San Francisco; Tchaikovsky

gabriel saldana - flickr
gabriel saldana – flickr

saw the inaugural performance of Swan Lake four years later, in 1877, eight thousand miles away at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow; a century and two decades before this day, the American slave liberator Frederick Douglass died; six years subsequently, in 1901, a baby boy was born across the Atlantic in France who would grow up to become thinker and writer Rene Dubos; a year after that to the day, in 1902 on the other side of the Atlantic, another male child came into the world who would mature as the acclaimed photographic genius, Ansel Adams; a hundred six years before the here-and-now,the French publication Le Figaro issued the Futurist Manifesto; two years shy of one century ago, one of the first recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize, journalist and critic Klas Arnoldson, took his final breath; half a decade later, in 1921, the Young Communist League of Czechoslovakia came into being; nine decades before this point in time, a boy child entered the world who would go on to fame and fortune as popular and critically exalted director and screenwriter Robert Altman; eighty-two years back, Adolf Hitler met in secret with leading German industrialists and financiers to negotiate financing for the upcoming Nazi electoral campaign; precisely a decade later, in 1943, The Saturday Evening Post and Norman Rockwell mirrored Franklin Roosevelt’s State of the Union speech in extolling the Four Freedoms, at the exact same time that Office of War Information gained the backing of Hollywood moguls to censor U.S. films; fifty-three years prior to our present conjunction, John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Mercury space program; five years afterward, in 1967, a baby boy came howling into the world on his way to a brief life as rocker Kurt Cobain; another half-decade further on, in 1972, journalistic icon Walter Winchell had his last day alive; twenty-nine years ago, the Soviet Union launched its first Mir Space Station, which was to be a fifteen year project with human presence on board two thirds of that period; a decade back, the original gonzo journalist, Hunter S. Thompson, breathed his last.

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
luck OR fate OR randomness "course of history" OR evolution OR "human development" contribution OR inherent OR aspect = 79,200,000 Prime Citations.

book hor

TOP OF THE FOLD

http://ecowatch.com/     A briefing about an upcoming conference at New York’s Academy of Medicine, which Helen Caldicott will co-moderate, and at which various luminaries of progress and peace will speak, textually short but including an hour-long podcast interview of Caldicott, one of multiple recent articles that concern energy and other specifics that affect nuclear matters and other citations that concern the peccadilloes of scientific procedures and protocols, the gathering next weekend in Manhattan’s topic an examination of various nuclear routes to human extinction: “Dr. Caldicott warns that the chaos in Ukraine now threatens 15 Soviet-built atomic reactors still operating there.  She says the death toll from Chernobyl (which is still not fully covered) has climbed to more than a million people, and that the western campaign to ‘back Putin into a corner’ is fraught with global dangers.
     The horrors of Fukushima, Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and more should long ago have made it clear to humankind that there’s no safe place on this Earth for atomic power, either in the form of reactors or bombs.
     The upcoming symposium, she says, will be recorded and archived, and turned into a book like other conferences she’s convened.  This, she says, may be her last.  So don’t miss it!”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

NALAC Fund for the Art – Launched in 2005 by the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures with major support from the Ford Foundation, the NALAC Fund for the Arts provides a variety of grants to assist US-based Latino artists and arts organizations in the development, creation, presentation and sustainability of artistic excellence, as well as the opportunity to participate in activities that contribute to professional and organizational growth.

NET Playwright’s Center – For the past four years, NET and the Playwrights’ Center  have partnered to support collaborations between NET ensemble members and members of the Playwrights’ Center’s Core Writers Program. Grants of $4,000 are given to support Ensemble and Playwright collaborations.

PWC Center Playwright opportunities  – For years, busy playwrights have relied on the Playwrights’ Center for our extensive, robust, continually updated collection of playwriting opportunities. This database of opportunities is updated almost every day and contains information on contests, theaters looking for scripts, publication opportunities, fellowships, and more. The opportunities board is a benefit of Playwrights’ Center membership. If you want access to hundreds of opportunities like the ones you see below—as well as a host of other benefits—become a member today!

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

– The Virginian-Pilot : Editor-Special Sections (Norfolk-VA) – 02/13/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8967

– Reading Eagle : Reporter (Reading-PA) – 02/17/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8968

– Reading Eagle : Business writer (Reading-PA) – 02/17/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8969

– Journalismnext.com : test (Windsor-CA) – 02/18/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8971

 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

 

"Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing" por W. Müller Wikimedia Commons
“Cannabis sativa Koehler drawing” por W. Müller Wikimedia Commons

Native American Tribes and Marijuana

A Government Executive posting that discusses the relationship between marijuana legislature and Native American tribes: “Thanks to a clarifying memo from the Justice Department last October, Native American tribes can now decide for themselves whether to legalize, grow, process, or sell marijuana on their lands. Which means tribes are going to be in the “same situation” as states, says Salvador Mungia, a Tacoma-based lawyer who has represented the ACLU in recent Washington state marijuana cases. Just like a state can decide whether to allow medical marijuana, recreational marijuana, or both, Indian reservations can also choose to open a pot dispensary or grow fields of legalized weed on their lands.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

Podcasts Potential

A Digiday article that discusses the future of podcasts, and possibilities involving growth of the medium: “Podcasts, aided by the smash hit “Serial,” are having a moment. They’ve broken through with mainstream audiences, they’ve piqued interest from brand advertisers. Ad agencies — when they’re not busy producing their own podcasts — finally feel comfortable discussing podcast buys with clients.

Despite these gains, the podcast industry has been mostly unable to tap into what could become its largest listener segment: people who use phones with Google’s mobile operating system, Android.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Hip Hop Cultural Appropriation Claims

A World Socialist Web Site posting, inspired by recent events,  discussing the reasons why analyzing the hip hop world in terms of cultural misappropriation and racial co-optation is misguided at best: “However, the general climate of the last several decades has been dominated by individualism, worship of money and status, and political conformism. Much of the noise, posturing and bravado in hip hop, in reality, is an effort to conceal the fact that, on all important matters, the leading artists, often aspiring or successful businessmen and women, align themselves with official public opinion.

So, to suggest that the “radicalism” and “anti-authoritarian sneer” of African American-dominated rap music, which supposedly “valorizes outsiders and underdogs,” is threatened by Iggy Azalea’s “empty white echo,” in the manner of Washington Post pop music critic Chris Richards, is a fantasy. The anti-establishment image of hip hop, in fact, has been largely a marketing and public relations gimmick, which has helped build up careers and bank accounts for a host of performers, producers and record company executives.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

"MQ-9 Reaper in flight (2007)" by U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Brian Ferguson
“MQ-9 Reaper in flight (2007)” by U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Brian Ferguson

Drone Armageddon Imminent

A Global Research article that discusses a huge blunder that the Obama administration will make if the powers that be insist on promoting warfare and empire through the use of inhumane weapons: “Here we go again. The US Empire does what it does best, exporting more death, destruction and terror around the world. On Tuesday the Obama administration disclosed that it plans to export killer drones to its allies from Turkey to Italy to Saudi Arabia. And we already know how that song goes. In recent years the Islamic extremists have managed to invariably get their hands on countless weapons and arms shipments intended for our so called allies. Be it in Iraq or Syria, arms that were supposed to go to the Iraqi army or allied Kurds or moderate rebels in Syria somehow always get delivered to the Islamic State extremists, the latest US-Israeli-Saudi created terrorist monster-on- steroids.

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Frozen Misery for Most Unfortunate

A World Socialist Web Site posting describing the human toll of extraordinary temperatures on the nation’s poorest, and the true cost of austerity: “Record low temperatures and wind chills across the eastern United States have caused at least a hundred deaths so far this winter, particularly among the most vulnerable sections of society, including the extremely poor and the elderly. For the millions of homeless men, women, and children in America, each day is a struggle for survival.

Three recent deaths have brought the number of cold-related fatalities in Cook County, Illinois, where Chicago is located, to at least 21 this winter. During the 2013-14 winter season, there were 32 cold-related fatalities in Cook County alone.”

2.18.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

The vast majority of Americans, apparently, would rather drive spikes into their eyes than acknowledge the realities of class conflict, class relations, and the formative role of social class in both the broad definition and particular expression of our larger society, a chariness to deal with certain realities that inevitably distorts personal awareness and makes any collective action for social justice or even simple social welfare almost impossible to accomplish.

Quote of the Day
“We live in a disposable society.  We throw so much away.  But it doesn’t come from nowhere.  It comes from the planet and it comes from future generations’ lives. …We live in a world that tells us not to care, to consume everything in sight.  It tells us that being cool and being an individual actually means buying what everyone else is buying and doing what everyone else is doing.”  Julia Butterfly Hill
This Day in History

In the Sixth Crusade seven hundred eighty-six years ago, the second Frederick Holy Roman Emperor negotiated a decade long 364px-Jerusalem_Erlöserkirche_um_1900truce by which Christians regained control of Jerusalem, Nazareth, and Bethlehem without fighting; six hundred eighty-three years back, Ethiopia’s Emperor Amda Seyon led an expansion of Ethiopian and Christian culture and power throughout much of Africa’s Horn; five hundred thirty seven years before this moment, British rulers executed King Edward IV’s brother for treason against his sibling; four hundred sixty-nine years ago, the reformer and protestant Martin Luther died; eighteen years hence, in 1564, artist and thinker Michelangelo breathed his last; two centuries and seven decades back, a baby boy was born who would grow up to electrify humankind as Alessandro Volta;two hundred forty-nine years prior to this moment-in-time, a slave ship’s ‘chattel cargo’ rose up and destroyed the vessel, with survivors then facing recapture in South Africa; two hundred thirty-four years before the here-and-now, England initiated a war of colonial expansion against Dutch rule in West Africa; sixteen years later, in 1797, English forces used France’s revolutionary upsurge as an excuse further to expand Britain’s colonial reach with an invasion of Trinidad; one hundred fifty-four years ago, Jefferson Davis assumed command as512px-Confederate_100_Dollars President of the Confederate States of America, and across the Atlantic, the second Victor Emmanuel took charge of a nearly unified Italy as king; a century-and-a-half prior to the present pass, on their march to the sea, Union troops under William Sherman’s generalship burned the South Carolina capitol of Columbia; one hundred thirty years back to the day, Samuel Clemons, under his Mark Twain moniker, first published Huckleberry Finnone hundred six years prior to this juncture, a male infant entered the world who would grow up as writer and historian Wallace Stegner; three hundred sixty-five days afterward, in 1910, the firebrand abolitionist Lucy Stanton spent her last day alive; one year subsequently, in 1911, a French competitive pilot book sq6made the world’s first air mail delivery in India, taking some six-to-seven thousand letters a distance of six to seven miles in his biplane; ninety-three years ago, a baby girl uttered a first cry on her way to a long life as feminist, writer, and publisher Helen Gurley Brown; a decade after that, in 1932, Japan’s imperial rulers declared Manchuria separate from China and hence open for annexing or other exploitation as Japanese hegemons saw fit, and a baby boy drew his first breath on his way to a career as filmmaker and screenwriter Milos Forman; seventy-two years back, Nazi police arrested top partisans of Germany’s White Rose Society, which had called for active resistance to Hitler and his cronies; three years after precisely, in 1946, sailors of Britain’s Royal Indian Navy mutinied in Bombay, a resistance movement that spread throughout the country and involved almost eighty ships; another three hundred sixty-five days further on, in 1947, French troops temporarily gained complete control of Hanoi in the First Indochina War; sixty-five years prior to this precise conjunction, a male infant came along who would become acclaimed filmmaker and screenwriter John Hughes; half a decade hence, in 1955, the first of many of the Teapot Series nuclear weapons atmospheric tests in Nevada took place; forty-eight years ago, physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer drew his final breath; three years thereafter, in 1970, a jury in Chicago acquitted the so-called ‘Chicago Seven’ of the charges against them for conspiracy and more, and a girl child came into the world who would grow up as environmental activist Julia Butterfly Hill; four years back,people’s poet and writer Victor Martinez died; three years down the road, just one year past in 2014, the Maidan murders in Kiev reached their peak in the overthrow of the elected and corrupt President of Ukraine.book hor2

SEARCH OF THE DAY
solidarity "class consciousness" "inextricably intertwined" OR "completely interdependent" OR "totally interdependent" OR "largely interdependent" = 1,520 Citations.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

http://www.socialeurope.eu       An absolutely mandatory analysis from Social Europe about the glaring contradictions of, call it what we will, the ‘liberal platform’ or the ‘progressive project,’ in which all of the hopes and dreams of democracy and solidarity depend on results in the immediate future that reflect popular choices and grassroots voices instead of the grants and tricks and machination of, call them what we will, ‘elites’ or plutocrats: “The Syriza negotiators are presenting a direct challenge to the powers that be.  Their audacity consists of suggesting that the European institutions should be more responsive to the democratic process.  They are making the point of principle that national elections should not be entirely irrelevant.
     At stake is the credibility of the electoral road to a more progressive Europe – this is the basic premise of social democratic strategy in Europe, not some harebrained crackpot scheme.  A negative outcome for Syriza is bad news for anyone who believes that once the votes have been counted the votes should count.
     The choices facing the likes of Jeroen Dijsselbloem are therefore stark: they can either work to consolidate a Europe of subjects or defend a Europe of citizens.  They can look to enforce the status quo or attempt to change the rules of the game.  They can choose to represent the European institutions to their electorate, or to represent their electorate through the European institutions.  They can look out for the part or for the whole.
      If they fail to rise to the occasion, the historic price to pay will be very high.  A bevy of far-right nationalists is waiting in the wings, eager to scapegoat internal and external enemies, and prepared to promise to safeguard sovereignty against an unresponsive and disconnected European elite.  The risk is not abstract; they are already comfortably installed in parliaments across the Union, rising in the polls, and ready to take advantage of the situation.  If the progressive challenge fails, the fascist challenge is up next.  The end of the end of history is well upon us.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

Gival Press 11th Annual Gival Press Novel Award-  Submissions of a previously unpublished original (not a translation) novel in English must be approximately 30,000 to 100,000 words of high literary quality, etc.  Author should keep a copy of the submission as it will not be returned.

2015 Southeastern Writers Workshop will be June 19-23, 2015 at Epworth by the Sea on scenic St. Simons Island, Georgia.  The weekend workshop (June 20-21) is dedicated to fiction writing. The weekday workshop (June 22-23) is focused on nonfiction writing. Registration for a single workshop is $249. Full conference tuition for both workshops is $445; however, those opting to stay on campus at Epworth by the Sea receive a discounted tuition of $395.  14th Annual Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest (no fee)
Top prize $1,000. Ten Honorable Mentions of $100 each. Winning entries published online. Accepts published and unpublished work.Enter for free by April 1.

Utmost Christian Poetry Contest Deadline: February 28. Christian writers are invited to compete for $3,000 in cash prizes, including a grand prize of $1,000 and a second prize of $500. Special awards for rhyming poems.

42 Miles Press Poetry Award Deadline: March 1. Indiana University South Bend’s 42 Miles Press Poetry Award will be given to an emerging or established poet for a book-length manuscript of at least 48 pages. Winner receives $1,000, 50 copies, and will be invited to give a reading in South Bend. David Dodd Lee, Series Editor, will judge. Entry fee: $25 made payable to Indiana University.

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Beaverton OR  – Needs a bachelor’s degree in journalism, experience in both print and video media. Will be writing news stories for the news and for the web, will also perform occasional video editing. Part-time opportunity.

Skillset.com is looking for knowledgable professionals who can write about education, career development, professional certification, and IT career certification topics. Experience as an information technology or educational professional is a plus, but not required.

Allett Inc. We are a thin wallet company looking for an experienced blogger/writer to research and write articles for our website. We will give you the topics to write about and are open to ideas for new topics as well. Our website is soon to be remodeled and your articles will appear in our blog section. We are looking to engage with and increase our online interaction with our customers. 

Freelance Writer – PulsePoint™ is a next-gen advertising technology platform that fuses the science of programmatic targeting, distribution and optimization with the art of content marketing. Our platform is powered by terabytes of impression-level data, allowing brands to efficiently engage the right audiences at scale while helping publishers increase yield through actionable insights.

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

364px-Jerusalem_Erlöserkirche_um_1900Olive Branch for Israel Palestine A Good posting that describes a wonderful initiative occurring in the long-disputed lands, demonstrating that folks with a common interest in improving their lives and sharing a resource can fairly easy overcome false rivalries: “OOWB is a collaborative economic initiative among 34 olive oil farming communities in Israel and the West Bank. It is spearheaded by the Near East Foundation (NEF), a 100-year old nongovernmental organization working on economic development among poverty-stricken communities throughout Africa and the Mideast. The initiative is funded by USAID, which provides financial and operative assistance to foreign nations and regions in need. The program has been successful enough that USAID has just granted OOWB its second $1.2 million round of funding, expected to serve some 2,000 Palestinians and Israelis working in the olive oil business over the course of three years.”

US flag reflexion on Vietnam Veterans Memorial 12 2011 000124 by Mariordo Mario Roverto Durán Ortiz - Own work
US flag reflexion on Vietnam Veterans Memorial 12 2011 000124 by Mariordo Mario Roverto Durán Ortiz – Own work

Vietnam Retrospective A thorough Consortium News offering that explores the many faceted consequences of the tragically ill-conceived war America waged on Vietnam: “This is Vietnam as seen through the lens of five American ex-soldiers: They returned to their former battlefield, where three saw fierce fighting, to live full time among and to aid the people burdened by two terrible legacies of that war. These tragedies are the thousands of children and farmers who still are blown up or injured by bombs dropped half a century ago that didn’t explode back then. And the chillingly large number of children and adults who suffer from the effects of the world’s most poisonous defoliant, Agent Orange; today fourth-generation children continue to be born with twisted and useless limbs. Throughout Vietnam today, this band of brothers in peace, travel and work tirelessly to help these victims of a war long past. The group includes a poet, a psychiatric social worker, a former aide to a United States senator, a former cop and a long ago gang member who found peace and purpose back here, in Vietnam.”

Spanish Party Democratic Expression A Common Dreams article that describes the burgeoning of true democracy in Spain as a response to antidemocratic measures, an occurrence that can serve as an example to other struggling states: ““Probably,” Iglesias said of his party, “we are the result of the disaster of these policies of austerity in Spain. And probably we are the expression of the hope now.” Iglesias described how the Spanish people are beginning to understand that in democracy, when something is going wrong, you can activate and organize to change course. “We are a new opportunity of change in Spain,” Iglesias continued, and we are happy to be an instrument of the people for political change.””

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

U.S. DEPRESSION BREAD LINEGig Economy Woes A Fast Company article that properly contextualizes the inhuman conditions of gig economy contractors, and discusses steps lawmakers seek to take to address these ills, a move that threatens the very viability of a business that relies exclusively on the basest form of slave labor and worker exploitation: “Lawsuits like the one being brought against Handy are just the most threatening cloud in a brewing storm. Uber drivers have protested in San Francisco and Los Angeles and gone on strike in New York. Anecdotes in high-profile stories about Homejoy, a cleaning service similar to Handy, detail grueling hours and so little pay that in one instance, the worker was homeless. Workers on Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, an online platform that pays independent contractors cents per task, recently orchestrated a letter-writing campaign to Jeff Bezos asking for him “to see that Turkers are not only actual human beings, but people who deserve respect, fair treatment, and open communication.” Legally, Uber and Lyft are also facing charges of misclassifying workers, and a case against an online work platform called Crowdflower that uses independent contractors to complete tasks is in the process of being settled.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Journalism Incubation  A Nieman Lab article that discusses a media accelerator company that tries to connect old and traditional journalism companies: “While previous Matter classes have mostly been made up of relatively unknown entrepreneurs looking to build media-related products, some names among the new class will be familiar to Nieman Lab readers. Setrakian, for example, is the founder of News Deeply, the single-subject news network that creates content around timely, specific stories as they develop, such as Ebola Deeply or Syria Deeply. Setrakian hopes to focus on continuing to grow the News Deeply project and brand. “We’re here to solidify the proposition, to take the single-subject news model that we’ve come to be known for and turn it into a successful, scalable media startup,” she says. “

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons
By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons

Vulture Capitalists Haunt Argentina A Naked Capitalism post that describes same old shenanigans that Argentina has been subjected to since the earliest days it decided to sell out to international banks, in spite of all attempts to democratize: “Argentina’s infamous “vulture funds”, as the holdout creditors represented by Paul Singer’s NML Capital are affectionately known, are back at their usual antics of trying to claw back from the Argentine government what they (and the US court system) see as rightfully theirs. But these holdouts lost a critical battle last week in the courts of the United Kingdom, where London Judge David Richards ruled that the Bank of New York, rather than Argentina, was responsible for not making payments on Argentina’s bonds issued under UK law. In the eyes of the British court, Argentina has made the payment and the onus of distributing the funds to the bondholders falls on BoNY.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Veterans History Project A Library of Congress posting that discusses a poignant chapter in the life of an unlikely WWII recruit, and helps illustrate the myriad ways war affects people: “Overall, this vast collection of letters between the Jaffes is the correspondence of a long-time married couple unused to separation. Betty did not expect to be managing the family business at that stage of her life, and Ralph Jaffe was unprepared for the rigors and monotony of Army life. They knew each other so well, they did not have to tiptoe around issues of health, money, resentment, anger, loneliness, ennui, and maintaining one’s values in the face of challenges.”

2.19.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

 

"Cocacola-5cents-1900 edit2" by derivative work: Victorrocha
“Cocacola-5cents-1900 edit2” by derivative work: Victorrocha

That every imperial, or national, or ‘civilized’ society has manifested its own “ruling class” is controvertible only if one chooses to overlook or discount almost limitless caches of evidence about families and networks that have in fact obviously administered and otherwise overseen both the day-to-day operations of governments, as well as other institutions, and the more-involved, longer-term, strategies and plans that have yielded expansion and conquest and war and more.

Quote of the Day
“Reading for me was a refuge.  I could escape from everything that was miserable in my life and I could be anyone I wanted to be in a story, through a character.  It was almost sinful how much I liked it.  That’s how I felt about it.  If my parents knew how much I loved it, I thought they would take it away from me.  I think I was also blessed with a very wild imagination because I can remember, when I was at an age before I could read, that I could imagine things that weren’t real and whatever my imagination saw is what I actually saw.  Some people would say that was psychosis but I prefer to say it was the beginning of a writer’s imagination.  If I believed that insects had eyes and mouths and noses and could talk, that’s what they did.  If I thought I could see devils dancing out of the ground, that’s what I saw.  If I thought lightning had eyes and would follow me and strike me down, that’s what would happen.  And I think I needed an outlet for all that imagination, so I found it in books.”  Amy Tan
This Day in History
Giovanni Paolo Panini (Italian, Piacenza 1691–1765 Rome) - Ancient Rome
Giovanni Paolo Panini (Italian, Piacenza 1691–1765 Rome) – Ancient Rome

One thousand eight hundred and eighteen years back, two contenders to rule the Roman Empire led huge armies into the bloodiest internecine warfare in Roman history, so as to determine which faction would rule the chieftains of loot in charge of Rome; sixteen hundred fifty-nine years ago, the second Emperor Constantius ordered all pagan shrines in the entire empire to close; three hundred sixty-six years back, Holland’s hopes of colonizing part of Brazil ended with the defeat of Dutch forces at the Second Battle of Guararapes; a quarter century subsequently, in 1674, roughly a century in advance of their next colonial dust-up, England and the Netherlands settled the Third Anglo-Dutch War, in part by transferring New Amsterdam and Manhattan to British rule; in Wakefield, Alabama two hundred eight years before the here-and-now, Vice President Aaron Burr faced arrest for treason and confinement at Fort Stoddert; in Switzerland, a hundred eighty-two years before

By ProtoplasmaKid cc 4.0
By ProtoplasmaKid cc 4.0

today, a baby boy came into the world who would grow up to be a journalist, peace activist, and Nobel Peace Prize recipient named Ellie Dullomun; one hundred sixty-nine years ago, Texas officially formed a State government to which the Republic of Texas transferred power, permitting the Lone Star’s entry into the U.S. firmament; a decade and a half later, in 1861, Russian rulers ordered the abolition of serfdom; a hundred thirty-seven years prior to the present pass, Thomas Edison successfully presented his patent for the phonograph; nine years thereafter, in 1887, the popular journalist and anti-imperial writer who called himself Multatuli died;seven years later to the day, in 1896, a male baby was born in France who would go on to become acclaimed poet Andre Breton; ninety-eight years back, a baby girl uttered her first cry en route to life as author and storyteller Carson McCullers; seventy-three years before the present point, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 that permitted placing Japanese Americans in concentration camps; sixty-seven years ago, a widely attended 640px-Presidency_University_-_Kolkata_7404student conference began in Calcutta, India that helped to foster widespread nationalist and communist resistance and rebellion in different parts of Southern and Southeast Asia; half-a-world away and three hundred sixty-six days afterward, in 1949, Ezra Pound received the Bollingen Poetry Prize from Yale University; three years later, a baby girl entered the world who would become popular author Amy Tan; a year down the road on the dot, in 1953, Georgia became the first U.S. State to empower a Censorship Board to censor school and other official books in its jurisdiction; seven hundred thirty days hence, in 1955, the male child was born who would mature as playwright and popular actor, Jeff Daniels; fifty-seven years back, meanwhile, a little girl took her first breath on the other side of the Atlantic on the way to her life as the wildly popular author, Helen Fielding; three hundred sixty-five days subsequently, in 1959, Cyprus gained its independence from English rule; another year further down the road, in 1960,China launched its first sub-orbital research rocket; fifty-two years ago, Betty Friedan published her ‘middle-

VCU CNS flickr
VCU CNS flickr

class’ feminist ‘manifesto,’ The Feminine Mystiquethirty-nine years prior to this point-in-time, President Ford rescinded the Japanese internment camp order of FDR in 1942; exactly two years after that juncture, in 1978, Egyptian commandos sought surreptitiously to intervene in a Cypriot airport hijacking that involved Egyptian planes and nationals, leading to a firefight that resulted in the destruction of the aircraft and the death of at least fifteen special forces fighters; thirteen years prior to today, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mars Odyssey probe began its mapping of the surface of the Red Planet; four years before this exact conjunction, Singapore opened an exhibition that contained Tang Dynasty artifacts that explorers and scientists had recovered from an ancient shipwreck.

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SEARCH OF THE DAY
"student debt" OR "student loans" jubilee OR forgiveness OR "write off" justice OR "right thing to do" OR fairness benefit OR advantage analysis = 1,940,000

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TOP OF THE FOLD
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/2015/lynd180215.html            An extremely useful overview and review-essay, progressive and even social democratic, of the fallacies of U.S. foreign policy and imperial flag living room house booksarrogance, the apparently eternal vogue of ‘American Exceptionalism,’ one of various recent critiques of these sorts of simplistic fancies about the U.S., in terms of both political economy and domestic social movements, merely some of the arenas in which critical views should accompany assessments of such matters as this article examines, the ongoing attempt to ‘resuscitate’ Vietnam as a justifiable, even positive, exercise of imperial power: “This book, with this central theme, could not have appeared at a more appropriate moment.  The United States government has initiated a program, planned to extend over several years, to celebrate the Vietnam War.  The emphasis, as Appy incisively observes, will be not so much on the war itself, because this country lost that war, and not at all on the catastrophic harm inflicted by the American invasion on the Vietnamese people and the very ecology of Vietnam.  Rather our government will seek to stir up positive sentiment about the valor and sacrifice of American soldiers.  In this way, it is apparently hoped, the Vietnam syndrome of disillusionment and suspicion of government undertakings abroad can at last be overcome.
Draft_card_burning_NYC_1967   Why Were We in Vietnam?
The antiwar movement was never able to answer this question.   There were references to rubber, tin, and oil, but natural resources simply didn’t — and don’t — seem to explain the enormity of the American effort. …

     But the point to understand about the Kennedys, the Bundys, the Rostows, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., Richard Bissell (the Yale professor who was chief strategist for the Bay of Pigs), and their cohorts, is: They were not personally greedy.  They didn’t need to be.  They looked down on individual money-grubbing but considered themselves entrusted with managing the system as a whole.
     American capitalism, as they saw the world, was essential to preserving freedom.  Hence Vietnam was critically important, not as a market for American exports, but as a market for goods produced in Japan lest Japan fail in its function of offering a counterweight in Asia to the expansion of Communist China.
     In practice, so Appy continues his analysis, “the United States has been far more consistent in its support of capitalism than democratic rights.”  The Cold War“provided a powerful ideological cover for economic goals.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

National Theater Project Creation Creation & Touring Grants provide funds for creation and U.S. touring of artist-led, ensemble, devised projects. These grants are highly competitive and are awarded to approximately six projects annually.

Creative Capital provides integrated financial and advisory support to artists pursuing adventurous projects in all disciplines.  To learn more about Creative Capital and our approach to supporting artists, visit About Us. To learn more about how and when to apply, visit How to Apply.

Global Connections supports geographically unrestricted travel to foster international collaborations between US-based artists and their colleagues around the world. The program offers funding in three different categories: On the Road travel grants of up to $5,000 each, In the Labproject development grants of $10,000 each andOn the Stage touring grants between $10,000 and $15,000 each. Deadline March 11

Idea Cafe is excited to present its 16th $ 1,000.00 Small Business Grant aimed at helping businesses realize their full potential. This Grant is all about getting entrepreneurs to take steps toward living their dream and pursuing new heights. For all writers who feel their model fits the small biz paradigm. 

NEA Creative Writing Fellowships

Fellowships in fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Non-matching grants are for $25,000.  Application Deadline: March 11, 2015

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

– Editorial Projects in Education (Education Week) : Assistant Commentary Editor (Bethesda-MD) – 02/05/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8955

– Gannett Co. Inc. : Reporters, Coaches, Photographers, Planners and Producers (Cincinnati-OH) – 02/09/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8963

– SourceMedia : Reporter (Arlington-VA) – 02/10/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8964

– Gannett Co. Inc. : Education Watchdog Reporter (Jackson-TN) – 02/11/15
URL: http://www.journalismnext.com/jobdetails.cfm?jid=8965

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

NYC strike Athena Saldana FlickrA Moral Movement Takes Form

A New Yorker article that analyses the clash between a divisive, retrograde establishment and a recent movement which hopes to mold populist ideals into a true expression of unity: “In Barber’s telling, the Moral Mondays movement is trying to establish a Third Reconstruction: a new alliance of black voters with working-class whites, Latinos, other immigrants, and liberal élites to meld the formal equality of the civil-rights era (the Second Reconstruction) with economic opportunity and fairness. The state legislature, on the other hand, is hellbent on a Second Redemption, rolling back the right to vote and undercutting democratic representation through gerrymandering. Of course, these interpretations of history, morality, and constitutionality are not simply true or false. They are the kinds of things that become true when people start living as if they were.”

comma_radio_stationLocal Journalism and Radio

A Nieman Lab posting that discusses the surprising role that online audio is playing in the revitalization of local newspapers: ““We’re ripping and reading our own stories on air,” Fisher told me as I joined him and the other hosts in on an on-air discussion about online radio as part of their “Behind the News” show, one of four hourlong shows they broadcast from the boat show that day.

As Internet radio and podcasting have become more prominent in recent years, a number of local newspapers — from small community chains like Hersam Acorn, which owns 18 local papers, to metro dailies like The Boston Herald — have launched online radio stations. “

Fake Democracy Ruled by Wealth

An Al Jazeera article that discusses the myriad ways that ‘democracies’ are no such thing, due to the pull that resources have over the decisions that mostly affect the ones who have no power to change things: “Recent research offers compelling answers to these criticisms. The new evidence adds credence to the Bartels-Gilens-Hacker view that money is corrupting American politics. By using a massive database of ideology that includes the super wealthy, Schaffner and Rhodes found that “members of Congress are much more responsive to the wealthy than to their poor constituents.” However, this difference is not equal between both parties; rather, Democrats are far more responsive to the poor than Republicans. (This is not surprising; other research supports this claim.) They find that both parties strongly favor the upper-middle class, those with $100,000 to $300,000 in wealth. But Republicans are not only more responsive to the rich, but particularly to rich donors. Schaffner and Rhodes argue that, “campaign donations, but not voter registration or participation in primary or general election, may help explain the disproportionate influence of the wealthy among Republican representatives.””

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

 

Desk - Bright Meadow Flickr
Desk – Bright Meadow Flickr

Caveat Emptor on Laptops

A Media Post article that warns of unintended consequences that an otherwise excellent laptop manufacturer can run into through the relentless drive to ‘remain competitive’: “But it emerged last night that the adware has some unintended consequences. Superfish — “a horrifically dangerous piece of software,” according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation — also leaves users vulnerable to hackers.

That’s because the program tinkers with Windows’ cryptographic security, in order to inject ads into secure HTTPS pages. “Lenovo has not just injected ads in a wildly inappropriate manner, but engineered a massive security catastrophe for its users,” the EFF says. “If you access your webmail from such a laptop, any network attacker can read your mail as well or steal your password. If you log into your online banking account, any network attacker can pilfer your credentials.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Intelligence Cellphone Espionage 

A Common Dreams posting that shows the extent of NSA overreaching in terms of violating the most basic privacy rights: “Explosive new reporting by The Intercept published Thursday, based on documents obtained by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, reveals how the U.S. spy agency and their British counterpart, the GCHQ, worked together in order to hack into the computer systems of the world’s largest manufacturer of cell phone SIM cards – giving government spies access to highly-guarded encryption codes and unparalleled abilities to monitor the global communications of those with phones using the cards.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

364px-Jerusalem_Erlöserkirche_um_1900Israel Settlements Challenged in Court

A Mondoweiss article that discusses actions taken against Israel’s continued chauvinism in regards to Palestine: “The Palestinian Foreign Ministry on Sunday said that it will respond to Israel’s continued expansion of illegal settlements in occupied Palestinian territories by referring the case to the International Criminal Court (ICC). “Israel’s aggression on the Palestinian people and the Palestinian state has crossed all the red lines and the situation is nearing a complete implosion,” the ministry said in a statement. The decision came in response to Israel’s announcement of tenders to erect 450 new illegal settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

Regulating Exchange in the Digital Age

A Tech Policy Daily article that touches on what makes Bitcoin so appealing, at the same time that it must contend with legal gray areas: “Bitcoin, it seems, is growing up. Exciting things are on the horizon for this “peer-to-peer (2)” digital currency, which allows individual users to transact directly, without an intermediary like a bank or credit card company. The details for how one can “earn” Bitcoins are intricate, but for the uninitiated, the emphasis of the system is on facilitating a “peer-to-peer” relationship. If this sounds familiar, it should; it harkens back to the ancient tradition of bartered exchange.”

2.17.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

Whatever being a worker entails in the contemporary United States, it does not suggest even a modicum, barely a smidgeon, of what radicals and thinkers have often called “class consciousness,” the awareness that since wages are one’s only source of ‘making a living,’ organizing and networking with others similarly situated is of utmost importance: unfortunately, such a state of general ignorance ends up exactly the opposite of blissful, since no social advance for working people is possible except collectively.

Quote of the Day
main_solstices_equinoxesThere are countless suns and countless earths all rotating round their suns in exactly the same way as the seven planets of our system.  We see only the suns because they are the largest bodies and are luminous, but their planets remain invisible to us because they are smaller and non-luminous.  The countless worlds in the universe are no worse and no less inhabited than our earth.  For it is utterly unreasonable to suppose that those teeming worlds which are as magnificent as our own, perhaps more so, and which enjoy the fructifying rays of a sun just as we do, should be uninhabited and should not bear similar or even more perfect inhabitants than our earth.  The unnumbered worlds in the universe are all similar in form and rank and subject to the same forces and the same laws.  Impart to us the knowledge of the universality of terrestrial laws throughout all worlds and of the similarity of all substances in the cosmos!  Destroy the theories that the earth is the centre of the universe!  Crush the supernatural powers said to animate the world, along with the so-called crystalline spheres!  Open the door through which we can look out into the limitless, unified firmament composed of similar elements and show us that the other worlds float in an ethereal ocean like our own!  Make it plain to us that the motions of all the worlds proceed from inner forces and teach us in the light of such attitudes to go forward with surer tread in the investigation and discovery of nature!  Take comfort, the time will come when all men will see as I do.”  Giordano Bruno
This Day in History

 

By Grzegorz Wysocki (Own work)
Viking Ship by Grzegorz Wysocki (Own work)

Six hundred forty-four years ago, invading Danes, Swedes, and other ‘Viking’ or Teutonic Europeans continued their campaigns against pagan locals in the Baltic region, in what historians now term the Northern Crusades; four hundred fifteen years back, Catholic inquisitors in Rome oversaw the immolation of philosopher Giordano Bruno for heresy; three hundred forty-two years before this exact point, the acclaimed dramatist and thinker, Moliere, breathed his last; the House of Representatives two hundred fourteen years prior to today decided an Electoral College tie between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr in Jefferson’s favor, leaving Burr as Vice President; a hundred ninety-six years before the here-and-now, Congress first passed the Missouri compromise to permit a continued dual development of the United States as half slave and half free; one

"1670 virginia tobacco slaves" by Unknown
“1670 virginia tobacco slaves” by Unknown

hundred seventy-seven years ago, hundreds of Dutch migrants met their end in a battle on the Blaukraans River in what is now Natal Province of South Africa, when indigenous Zulus massacred them; one hundred fifty-nine years prior to this juncture, the acclaimed German poet Heinrich Heine died; in Geneva, a hundred fifty-two years prior to the present pass, a group of bourgeois citizens founded the organization that would become the International Red Cross; Prussian troops one hundred forty-four years back marched in martial glory through the streets of a conquered Paris after their brutal victory in the brief Franco-Prussian War; a hundred eleven years ago, a baby boy took his first breath on his way to a peripatetic life as philosopher and political theorist Hans Morgenthau; five years later, in 1909, the brilliant Native American leader Geronimo drew his last breath; four years subsequently, in 1913, the Armory Show opened in New York with works of American artists who would for decades be critical taste-makers; ninety-one years before this day, a baby girl entered book horthe world who would grow up in politics and end up as popular writer, Margaret Truman; half a decade beyond that point, in 1929, a baby boy uttered his first shout en route to a life as a rabbi, thinker, and writer, Chaim Potok; four years hence exactly, in 1933, the Blaine Act ended the disaster of U.S. prohibition of alcohol; seventy-three years ago, a baby boy was born who would grow up to face official murder as leader and writer Huey Newton; seven years down the road, in 1949, Chaim Weizman became Israel’s first President; fifty-six years back, the U.S. launched the world’s first weather satellite, Vanguard II; six years after, in 1965, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched Ranger 8, which would map out the landing sites for the first manned mission to the moon; five years further on, in 1970, the Ukrainian-Israeli Nobel literary laureate Schmuel Yosef Agnon had his last day on Earth; the Chinese went to war with Vietnam exactly thirty-six years ago; chess champion Gary Kasparov fended off International Business Machines computer, Deep Blue, nineteen years before this conjunction in time and space.

book hor2

SEARCH OF THE DAY
"social class" opportunity inequality drawback OR "social problem" "political economy" OR radical analysis history = 554,000 Hits.

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TOP OF THE FOLD

http://www.pewinternet.org      A Pew Research Center Internet, Science, & Tech survey of citizens and scientists about their perceptions of science as an enterprise, government funding of research, flashpoints in scientific fields, and much more, in particular opinions about which significant disparities exist between the views of citizens and scientists: “A majority of the public sees societal benefit from government investment in science and engineering research.  Roughly seven-in-ten adults say that government investment in engineering and technology (72%) as well as basic science research (71%) pays off in the long run while a minority says such spending is not worth it (22% and 24%, respectively).  Positive views about the value of government investment in each area is about the same as in 2009, though negative views that such spending is not worth it have ticked up 5 points for engineering and technology research and 6 points for basic science research.

By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons
By 2bgr8 via Wikimedia Commons

  Views about the role of government funding as compared with private investment show steady support for government investment (61% in 2014 and 60% in 2009) but, there is a slight rise in the view that private investment, without government funds, will be enough to ensure scientific progress (from 29% in 2009 to 34% today).  The modest difference over time stems from more expressing an opinion today than did so five years ago. …
     Fully 83% of AAAS scientists report that obtaining federal research funding is harder today than it was five years ago.  More than four-in-ten say the same about industry funding (45%) and private foundation funding (45%) compared with five years ago.  Further, when asked to consider each of seven potential issues as a ‘serious problem for conducting high quality research today,’ fully 88% of AAAS scientists say that a lack of funding for basic research is a serious problem, substantially more than any of the other issues considered.
     Fully 83% of AAAS scientists report that obtaining federal research funding is harder today than it was five years ago.  More than four-in-ten say the same about industry funding (45%) and private foundation funding (45%) compared with five years ago.  Further, when asked to consider each of seven potential issues as a ‘serious problem for conducting high quality research today,’ fully 88% of AAAS scientists say that a lack of funding for basic research is a serious problem, substantially more than any of the other issues considered.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

America sponsors the annual Foley Poetry Award, given in honor of William T. Foley, M.D. Each entrant is asked to submit only one poem of 30 lines or fewer for consideration. Submissions must be postmarked between January 1 and March 31. The winning poem will be announced in early June and published in America. The cash prize will be $1,000.

Entries are now being sought for the 2015 Jeremy Mogford Prize for Food and Drink Writing, the annual short story competition run by the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival in association with Oxford Gastronomica, part of the Oxford School of Hospitality Management at Oxford Brookes University.

Named in honor of the distinguished American poet Emily Dickinson, the competition welcomes submissions of unpublished, original poems. This competition is open to all poets – those with or without previous publishing credits and from anywhere in the world. Winning manuscripts will reflect the thoughtful humanity and careful craftsmanship of Emily Dickinson’s poetry, though not necessarily her style. 

 Selected Shorts, along with Gotham Writers Workshop, is thrilled to announce that the 2015 Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize, judged by Karen Russell, will partner with our friends Electric Literature.  The winning entry will receive $1000 and the work will be performed and recorded live at the Selected Shorts performance at Symphony Space on Wednesday, June 10, 2015, and will be published on electricliterature.com. The winning writer will also earn free admission to a 10-week course with Gotham Writers Workshop.

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Copywriter-Editor
James Avery Jewelry
Kerrville, TX

Kennedy Communications Madison, WI –The Director of Account Services leads and manages the client service team by overseeing each account, ensures that client relationships are stable and thriving and identifies opportunities for growth, in addition to managing their own client accounts.
The Director also assists Account Executives in solving problems or client issues and mentors Account Executives as they grow in their careers. 

Spaner Marketing Communications Canton, OH – We need a good writer who wants to work directly with clients in a wide range of markets from technical to art museums. We are a very small advertising agency so you’ll wear many hats, learn a lot and have some fun in a unique downtown Canton office. We will consider all levels of experience.

Creative Services, IU Comm, Indiana University Bloomington, IN – Preferred: Three years of work in higher education or an organization or agency with a record of marketing/public relations work for clients with multiple audiences and many products; agency experience; experience in the role of web writer, writer/editor, copywriter, publications specialist, public relations specialist, communications assistant, or other job where writing and editing are the primary responsibilities.

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

Participatory Democracy in Action

A posting from Other Worlds that contextualizes the promising democratic alternative present in Central America: “Well, for us power is holistic. It is completely rooted in the people. There is a lot of wisdom in people, and so what leaders have to do is be with the people, listen to the people, and address the issues that the people raise, because together, we collectively build the alternatives that actually work. Anything that is done from an office is not going to coincide with reality. So we’re building from the people up.”

hiro explosion nuke nuclearNuclear Rain Aftereffects

A Common Dreams article that discusses retribution that Hiroshima survivors seek for aftereffects of atomic bomb: “The A-bomb survivors — all residents of Hiroshima Prefecture — are currently not receiving assistance under the Atomic Bomb Survivors’ Assistance Law as they were outside the black rain area recognized by the government. They will apply to the Hiroshima prefectural and municipal governments for A-bomb survivors’ certificates as early as next month. They expect to be rejected, and plan to file suit seeking a nullification of those rejections.”

Real Food Crusader

An EcoWatch posting that introduces readers to a real food advocate, a woman who tirelessly uncovers food industry malfeasance, often having to cope with personal threats in the process:  “Did you know you are eating yoga mat ingredients in your fast food sandwich or Silly Putty in your French fries? You should.

Once or twice in a generation a brave citizen or scientist stands up to the status quo, tells the truth about what most of us would rather ignore.  It changes everything about how we see the world, about the choices we make and how we live our lives.”

 

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

 

"Vegetarian diet" by Scott Bauer, USDA ARS
“Vegetarian diet” by Scott Bauer, USDA ARS

Brain Boosting Foods

An article that could be of use to any scrappy writer seeking to get the most bang for their buck, healthwise, from their food: “Who doesn’t want to become smarter? Who wants to look better or feel healthier? Many recent studies have shown how certain nutrients can positively affect the brain, specifically in areas of the brain related to cognitive processing or feelings and emotions. Generally speaking, you want to follow a healthy diet for your brain that will lead to strong blood flow, maintenance of mental sharpness and reduce the risk of heart disease and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Measure of an Idea

A Government Executive article that describes, with charts included, the seminal ideas to come out of uniquely American ideas and innovations: “But was it, really? Was it more significant than the transistor, or the microprocessor, or the World Wide Web? More importantly, how would an enthusiast of American ideas (as The Atlantic has proudly been for a century and a half) measure something as ineffable as the significance of a new invention? In fact, in a new paper, Mikko Packalen at the University of Waterloo and Jay Bhattacharya of Stanford University, devised a brilliant way to address this question empirically. In short, they counted words in patent texts.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

 

(Photo: London Palestine Action)
(Photo: London Palestine Action)

Heroic Efforts Shut Down Death Operation

A Mondo Weiss posting that documents the valiant efforts of various dissenting groups that occupied an optics and weapons factory in England: “Instro Precision, an arms company near Broadstairs (Kent), was occupied at 5am this morning to protest its sales to both Israel and Afghanistan. Four people are on the roof with banners to shut the factory down, with ten more on the ground, one of whom is locked to the fence. A wide range of groups came together to make this happen, including: Brighton BDS, Brighton Palestine Action, Smash EDO, Stop NATO Cymru, Anarchist Action Network, East Kent CAAT, Swansea Action for Palestine (with a bit of support from us too).”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

"Adderallrx" by FtWashGuy
“Adderallrx” by FtWashGuy

Hooked on Smart Drugs

A Guardian article that outlines the alarming trend among students to take performance enhancing drugs for study, which also touches upon some of the dire socioeconomic realities that students face which inspire some of this drug boom: ““We can track it from the change in stories that interest students these days. It’s stories about CVs, jobs, fees… much more so than it used to be. We can see it. Students are much more career-conscious than they were even five years ago when I was a student. They’re much more conscious of getting value out of their degree. The atmosphere is definitely careerist and competitive and getting more so.”

And, this is where modafinil, and the other smart drugs that have become increasingly common in universities across Britain – Ritalin (methylphenidate), Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts), Dexedrine (dextroamphetamine), all of which are attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications – start to look like a symptom rather than a cause.”

2.16.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

solidarityMany people confuse solidarity with agreement, or loyalty, in general, when in actuality its meaning in the twenty-first century context revolves around five key factors, simple yet indispensable: first, support for workers rights and empowerment; second, support for social rights and empowerment; third, support for citizens rights and empowerment; fourth, the existence and flowering of an engaged, participatory democracy; fifth, the growth of organizations that workers independently operate and lead.

Quote of the Day
“A revolution is not a bed of roses.  A revolution is a struggle to the death between the future and the past. …I was a man who was lucky enough to have discovered a political theory, a man who was caught up in the whirlpool of Cuba’s political crisis long before becoming a fully fledged Communist … discovering Marxism was like finding a map in the forest.”  Fidel Castro
This Day in History

  Eighteen hundred ninety-eight years ago, the Roman Emperor Trajan’s conquests in present-day Iraq and Armenia expanded Theodosius_II_solidus_Constantinople_439_450_gold_4480mgRome’s territorial extent to its greatest limits; seven hundred sixty-six years back, Louis IX sent a French representative to parlay with Mongol leaders who might conceivably overrun parts or even all of Europe; three hundred eighty-five years before the here and now, Holland’s troops expanded the parameters of Dutch Brazil with the capture of Olinda from the Portuguese; two hundred eleven years ago, Steven Decatur led a surprise attack on the recently captured U.S.S. Philadelphia, burning it and denying it to Libyan pirates in the First Barbary War; one hundred seventy-seven years before today, a baby boy was born into a prosperous and prominent New England family who would grow up as the author Henry Adams; a hundred sixty-two years prior to the present pass, the brothers Studebaker established the eponymous wagon company that would become the iconic automobile brand decades later; in England, one hundred thirty-nine years prior to this point, a male infant came into the world who would grow up as the ‘liberal’ historian and thinker G.M. Trevelyan; soon enough thereafter, a hundred eleven years before this instant, another boy child took his first breath en route to a life as the influential analyst book sq6and writer George Kennan; three years hence, in 1907, Italy’s first Nobel literary laureate, the poet Giosue Carducci, took his final breath; a decade later, in 1917, the French anarcho-liberal poet, playwright, and thinker Octave Mirbeau died; ninety-seven years back,Lithuanian leaders unanimously declared their country’s independence; eighty-eight years prior to the present moment, a baby boy uttered his first cry on the way to a life as acclaimed historian of slavery and more, David Brion Davis; eighty-one years ago, the Austrian Civil War ended with the defeat of Social Democratic and parliamentary partisans; two years subsequently, in 1936, Spain’s Popular Front took power after electoral victories briefly handed the socialist and communist and anarchist and populist party the reins of rule; seventy-one years back, the male newborn came along who would grow up as ‘accidental novelist’ of middle America, Richard Ford; fifty-seven years before this exact point-in-time, a little girl was born who would grow up as popular and critically lauded science writer Natalie Angier; just a year afterward, in 1959, Fidel

By Jialiang Gao www.peace-on-earth.org
Havana By Jialiang Gao www.peace-on-earth.org

Castro came to power as a revolutionary leader in Cuba; two years further on, in 1961, Chicago’s DuSable Museum opened as the first institution that focused on African American history and culture; also in Chicago thirty-seven years ago, the first computer Bulletin Board System came into operation; two dozen years before today, Enrique Bermudez, the Nicaraguan fascist, died from assassins bullets in Mangua; after the arrest of one of their key leaders in Turkey sixteen years back, Kurdish militants seized embassies and held hostages in protest all over Europe; two years afterward, in 2001, sexologist and thinker William Masters died; and four years hence from that point, in 2005, the Kyoto Global Warming Protocols took effect after their prior ratification in 1997; just seven hundred thirty days before this instant, Russian thinker and philosopher, as well as famed Soviet dissident, Gregor Pomerants took his last breath.

book hor2

SEARCH OF THE DAY
"higher education" OR "university education" OR "college studies" free OR right OR "social benefit" OR entitlement OR privilege "political economy" OR radical analysis = 25,000,000 Results.

book hor

TOP OF THE FOLD

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article40996.htm           A juicy essay from MIT’s preeminent linguist and gadfly, in yesterday’s edition of International Clearinghouse, an assessment of the history of science, the nature of theories of matter and mind, ruminations epistemological and more generally philosophical combined, densely layered and worth many readings by scrappy scribes who want to figure out how to move on the basis of where they stand: “For these quite different kinds of reasons, the great P_Sciencefigures of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment believed that there are phenomena that fall beyond human understanding.  Their reasoning seems to me substantial, and not easily dismissed.  But contemporary doctrine is quite different.  The conclusions are regarded as a dangerous heresy.  They are derided as ‘the new mysterianism,’ a term coined by philosopher Owen Flanagan, who defined it as ‘a postmodern position designed to drive a railroad spike through the heart of scientism.’  Flanagan is referring specifically to explanation of consciousness, but the same concerns hold of mental processes in general.

The ‘new mysterianism’ is compared today with the ‘old mysterianism,’ Cartesian dualism, its fate typically misunderstood.  To repeat, Cartesian dualism was a perfectly respectable scientific doctrine, disproven by Newton, who exorcised the machine, leaving the ghost intact, contrary to what is commonly believed.

By Allan Ajifo
By Allan Ajifo

The ‘new mysterianism,’ I believe, is misnamed.  It should be called ‘truism’ — at least, for anyone who accepts the major findings of modern biology, which regards humans as part of the organic world.  If so, then they will be like all other organisms in having a genetic endowment that enables them to grow and develop to their mature form.  By simple logic, the endowment that makes this possible also excludes other paths of development.  The endowment that yields scope also establishes limits. What enables us to grow legs and arms, and a mammalian visual system, prevents us from growing wings and having an insect visual system. …

The quest for better explanations may well indeed be infinite, but infinite is of course not the same as limitless. English is infinite, but doesn’t include Greek.  The integers are an infinite set, but do not include the reals.  I cannot discern any argument here that addresses the concerns and conclusions of the great mysterians of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment.

We are left with a serious and challenging scientific inquiry: to determine the innate components of our cognitive nature in language, perception, concept formation, reflection, inference, theory construction, artistic creation, and all other domains of life, including the most ordinary ones.  By pursuing this task we may hope to determine the scope and limits of human understanding, while recognizing that some differently structured intelligence might regard human mysteries as simple problems and wonder that we cannot find the answers, much as we can observe the inability of rats to run prime number mazes because of the very design of their cognitive nature.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

Biannual literary journal Vestal Review (est. 2000) is now open to receiving submissions until the end of May. The journal specializes in publishing well-plotted flash literary fiction—short, short stories under 500 words. 

Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission

Plenitude Magazine has updated its writer’s guidelines and is inviting submissions from freelance writers. The quarterly magazine is now an online publication, free and available to everyone. Plenitude Magazine supports the progress and advancement of LGBTTQI literature by publishing diverse literary works by both aspiring and experienced LGBTTQI writers. 

Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission

Living Education Journal Needs Articles Related to Homeschooling Oak Meadow (est. 1975), an accredited distance learning school, needs submissions for Living Education, the school’s complimentary magazine distributed to readers in the academic and homeschooling communities 

Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission

Barrelhouse Journal Reopens for Nonfiction Essays Barrelhouse, which publishes a biannual literary journal and whose stories have appeared in the Best American Nonrequired Reading, has announced the editors are open for nonfiction submissions. The editors are not accepting poetry at this time—only nonfiction – See more at: 

Copyright © WritingCareer.com – used with permission

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

The Fly Summit, NJ – We’re looking to fill a Staff Writer position located in either our Bayside, NY or Summit, NJ office. Writing experience is required, with internship experience acceptable. Financial writing experience, including financial journalism or business writing, is strongly preferred. Being able to excel in a fast paced environment is a must.

Wall Street Daily Baltimore, MD – We want someone who is interested in learning copywriting from a new perspective. You won’t just write sales letters. You’ll use state-of-the-art marketing, technology and “sales stories” to drive your response rates higher, consistently. Ultimately you’ll develop into a new breed of master copywriter – the Story Architect. 

Duke Magazine (Durham NC), the university’s award-winning alumni magazine, seeks an associate editor. The magazine showcases the intellectual dynamism of a community of engaged, interesting, and accomplished faculty members, students, and alumni. The associate editor should be a strong reporter and a nimble storyteller, be adept at writing long-form and short pieces alike, show a wide-ranging intellectual curiosity, and have experience generating ideas and editing copy.dd

The Child Center of NY Woodside, NY We are seeking an experienced Grant Writer to write select foundation grant proposals in the fields of early childhood education and children’s mental health on a project by project basis. 

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

30 Community_gardenLove and Philanthropy

An Inside Philanthropy article that seeks to demonstrate that philanthropists and other deep pockets can succeed in reversing today’s world problems if only they can manage to access a loving, caring, more evolved side to their funding efforts, thus bypassing any need of political transformation: “A more robust love framework for philanthropy might start where the Buffetts do: That we need to push back against a rising tide of self-interest, along with the growing dominance of market values across society—values like competition, choice, and efficiency, as well as a belief that the chips should fall where they may, however harsh the outcomes.

Love doesn’t square with that world view. Because love is about a softer set of human values—like empathy, compassion, romantic connection, and the unconditional bonds of family. These values aren’t irrational or fuzzy, since humanity wouldn’t have come this far without them. But they are difficult to quantify or prioritize within any sort of marketplace. And so, as market values have taken over, love has gone on the defensive.

 

Fighting Back Against Militarization

A Common Dreams article that reports on the frightening reality of SWAT teams and other police abuse, and ends with a optimistic agenda as to what citizens can do to stem the coming tide:”Balko’s book and the ACLU’s first-rate new report, “War Comes Home: The Excessive Militarization of American Policing,” offer irrefutable evidence of the trend; both publications ought to be required reading for all Americans who value both freedom and safe neighborhoods.

But how to reverse the militarization trend? As Seattle’s police chief during the World Trade Organization’s 1999 “Battle in Seattle,” and acutely aware of my own unwise reliance on militarized tactics, I realize just how difficult the task will be. But that should not stop us. Here are five steps that can help us turn things around.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

 

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

Writing Blues

A fun Chronicle of Higher Education that sincerely articulates some of the sturm und drang involved in the writing process, while arguing that potentially the psychic distress of birthing words actually contributes to the best writing that writers can hope to do: “Surely there’s some middle ground here, between those of us who feel like we’re bleeding on the page and those of you who are quickly wiping down the kitchen counter after the meal has been prepared and eaten. On either end of the bell curve stretches a dangerous flat line where you care either too much or not enough and the work suffers, often by not getting done.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Musical History on Auction Blockrooftop_cover1 concert beatles

A Rolling Stone brief that discusses a fascinating piece of musical history soon to exchange hands from one private interest to, most likely, another: “A rare recording of the Beatles performing at a Hamburg, Germany strip club in December 1962 is set to hit the auction block starting February 27th. Auction house Ted Owen & Co. will offer up the original master recording tape of the small Star Club gigs, recorded between Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve 1962, with a reserve price of £100,000, or roughly $150,000, the Guardian reports, but they’re expected to fetch much higher at auction.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

Tentative Triumph in Ukraine

A Stockman’s Corner analysis of European leaders’ recent diplomatic mission to the land besieged by strife: “Given the intensity of the situation, Germany and France together took the initiative and forced the Wednesday night summit in Minsk, Belarus. The long night of talks, which extended deep into Thursday morning, was the apex of eight days of shuttle diplomacy between Moscow, Kiev, Washington and Munich. With intense focus during dozens of hours of telephone conversations and negotiations across the globe, the German chancellor helped wrest a cease-fire from the belligerents. It is a fragile deal full of question marks, one which can only succeed if all parties dedicate themselves to adhering to it. Whether that will be the case is doubtful. The Minsk deal is brief respite. Nothing more. But it is a success nonetheless.”

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

 

"Solar panels in Ogiinuur" by Chinneeb - Own work.
“Solar panels in Ogiinuur” by Chinneeb – Own work.

Clean Power Enemies 

An EcoWatch article that discusses the small techniques that dirty energy advocates are using in order to stall even the most cursory clean energy initiatives: “So why the outcry against the Clean Power Rule? Quite simply, its adoption will establish that U.S. is serious about averting the threat of global warming, that coal’s future as a primary fuel is coming to an end, and that the U.S. utility sector is poised to go through the most fundamental changes in 90 years.

As a result, the arguments being made are almost devoid of policy substance—because they are not really about the rule, but about what the rule symbolizes. Most of the attacks focus on legal technicalities and overheated constitutional rhetoric. None of them convincingly argues that cleaning up carbon pollution and shutting down outmoded, dirty power plants will be bad for the American economy.”

2.13.2015 Daily Links

A Thought for the Day

The cosmic cradle’s rocking, rarely detected, barely detectable, has incubated the stuff of galaxies and suns, the Earth and us: the vast span of matter and energy in transit contains nearly infinite reaches of time and space that in turn yield both every strange, unexpected articulation and its contemplation.

Quote of the Day
antioch“Contemporary Christianity, diverse and complex as we find it, actually may show more unanimity than the Christian churches of the first and second centuries.   For nearly all Christians since that time, Catholics, Protestants, or Orthodox, have shared three basic premises.   First, they accept the canon of the New Testament; second, they confess the apostolic creed; and third, they affirm specific forms of church institution.  But every one of these-the canon of Scripture, the creed, and the institutional structure–emerged in its present form only toward the end of the second century.   Before that time, as Irenaeus and others attest, numerous gospels circulated among various Christian groups, ranging from those of the New Testament, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, to such writings as theGospel of Thomas, the Gospel of Philip, and the Gospel of Truth, as well as many other secret teachings, myths, and poems attributed to Jesus or his disciples.  Some of these, apparently, were discovered at Nag Hammadi; many others are lost to us.  Those who identified themselves as Christians entertained many–and radically differing-religious beliefs and practices.   And the communities scattered throughout the known world organized themselves in ways that differed widely from one group to another.”  Elaine Pagels, from The Gnostic Gospels
This Day in History
Descartes Magnetic Field
Descartes Magnetic Field

Today, in tribute to the Electromagnetic Spectrum and those who have understood and used it, is World Radio Day; in a model for how ruling classes should conduct war,five hundred twelve years back, French knights disparaged Italian fighting spirit and ability, causing a thirteen-on-thirteen battle-competition, the loser of which had to pay a steep ransom; Catherine Howard, at 19, Wenceslas_Hollar_-_Catherine_Howard_(.)_(State_2)lost her head four hundred seventy-three years prior to this point at the Tower of London, a tragic end to this ‘wild child’s’ life; French authorities four hundred and forty years ahead of our time crowned the likely gay or bisexual Henry III whose dozen years of rule were religiously, politically, and socially fractious and brutal; three hundred eighty-two years before this day, the Inquisition in Rome prepared for the trial of the just-arrived Galileo Galilei; three hundred forty-seven years prior to the present pass, Spain formally acceded to Portugal’s independence; in what was in part a plot to destroy Scotland’s clan system, three hundred twenty six years ago, agents of the recently crowned William of Orange murdered four score Macdonalds at the Massacre at Glencoe; two hundred eighty-nine years before this very day, the preacher and writer Cotton Mather breathed his last; two hundred seventy-six years before the here-and-now, an Iranian force at the Battle of Karnaj won out over an Indian Mughal army; in

By Malthus_PL.svg: Kravietz derivative work (translation): Jarry1250 cc 3.0
By Malthus_PL.svg: Kravietz derivative work (translation): Jarry1250 cc 3.0

England, two hundred thirty-nine years prior to this precise conjunction, a baby boy was born who grew up as thinker and economist Thomas Malthus; a delegation of Romanian activists one hundred sixty-six years back petitioned the Austrian emperor with a General Petition of Romanian Leaders for national recognition;a hundred thirty-five years ago, Thomas Edison observed thermionic emission, a useful aspect of atomic chemical behavior that led, among other things, to the ‘discovery’ of the electron; exactly three hundred sixty-six days later, in 1881, French suffragette and anti-imperialist Hubertine Auclert oversaw the publication of the first issue of the feminist La Citoyennea century and a year before this conjunction, to further publisher and elite writer interests, artists and writers in New York formed the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers; eighty-four years back, New Delhi became India’s capitol city; seventy-two years ago, a baby girl entered the world who would mature as thinker and theological scholar Elaine Pagels; two years thereafter, in 1945, a male infant uttered his first cry en route to life as popular English historian Simon Schama; fifty-seven years back, Cristabel Pankhurst, the fiery feminist leader of Britain, took her final look around before dying; seven hundred thirty days later, in 1960, France exploded its first nuclear weapon, thereby becoming the fourth nation to construct atomic bombs; forty-eight years before just

Da Vinci Codex
Da Vinci Codex

now, researchers discovered a Da Vinci codex of immense significance in expressing his ideas and thinking; in a last-gasp effort to destroy North Vietnamese capacity four years hence, in 1971, South Vietnamese troops, assisted by U.S. Air Force cover and unacknowledged U.S. ground support, invaded Laos; a dozen years afterward, in 1982, several years of extrajudicial murder and slaughter began in Guatemala, in which U.S.-backed troops killed indigenous people by the thousands around Rio Negro; a quarter century ago, a plan for German reunification issued forth that soon came to pass; a year after that on the dot, a thousand miles to the South, U.S. smart bombs annihilated hundreds of civilians in a Baghdad bomb shelter that U.S. intelligence suggested was a military bunker; a day after Charles Schulz died fifteen years back, the final originalPeanuts cartoon strip appeared in newspapers; half a decade before this precise point in time, the acclaimed poet of the people, Louise Clinton, drew a final breath; two years further on, in 2012, the European Space Agency launched its first Vega Rocket from its facility in Caribbean South America.

book hor2

SEARCH OF THE DAY
"history of writing" speaking OR "recorded speech" analysis OR deconstruction OR interpretation OR explication = 16,800,000 Citations.

book hor

TOP OF THE FOLD

http://www.globalresearch.ca      A briefing from Global Research, initially concerned with Canada’s newest attempts to abrogate speech and understanding about ‘terrorism’ by labeling such discussion as ‘advocacy of terrorism,’ which in providing this reportage also contextualizes a vast swath of both the current political moment and the present media landscape, in terms of the latter such recent articles as ones about the University of Massachusetts decision to ban Iranian engineering students and many thousands more, a contextualization that, if we can pay heed, expresses a sine qua non comprehension for those who would truly ‘eliminate terrorism:’ “If the West really wants to stop terrorism, then it should stop allying itself to terror organizations, and it should stop invading secular countries.  That is the simple truth behind the blinding spin.
      But the West doesn’t really want to stop terrorism.
      Those who control the levers of power want to exploit unreasonable fear, they want to keep the public in the dark, and they want to impose police state legislation. They could not advance their destructive agendas if they told the truth.”

JOB & GRANT PROSPECTS, UPCOMING EVENTS & CONTESTS

student writing arm

OPPS/SUBS/CONTESTS

CREATIVE WRITING FOR SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (IRELAND)
——————————————————–
DEADLINE: March 2
PRIZES: €200 in total prizes
DETAILS: Two youth categories: 14 years and under, and 18 years and
under; submit poem or short story.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Writers’ Week Creative Writing for Special Educational
Needs, Literary Competitions, Writers’ Week Limited, 24 The Square,
Listowel, Co. Kerry, IRELAND, info@writersweek.ie
WEB: http://writersweek.ie/competition

KERRY COUNTY COUNCIL CREATIVE WRITING
FOR YOUTH COMPETITIONS (IRELAND)
——————————
DEADLINE: March 2
PRIZES: €1,500 in total prizes
DETAILS: Creative writing categories for five different youth age
brackets – submissions may be stories, poems or essays, plus a
limerick category for all youth age categories.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Writers’ Week Kerry County Council Creative Writing for
Youth Competitions, Literary Competitions, Writers’ Week Limited,
24 The Square, Listowel, Co. Kerry, IRELAND, info@writersweek.ie
WEB: http://writersweek.ie/competition

THE NILSSON LOCAL HERITAGE COMPETITION (IRELAND)
————————————————
DEADLINE: March 2
PRIZES: €750
DETAILS: Submit two copies of a published book on Local Heritage
(presumably Irish).  Not specified whether this competition is open
to writers outside of Ireland.
ONLINE/ELECTRONIC ENTRIES: No
CONTACT: Writers’ Week Nilsson Local Heritage Competition, Literary
Competitions, Writers’ Week Limited, 24 The Square, Listowel, Co.
Kerry, IRELAND, info@writersweek.ie
WEB: http://writersweek.ie/competition

 

pascal maramis - flickr
pascal maramis – flickr

JOBS

Reporter – Raleigh, North Carolina Triangle Business Journal reporter is the beating heart of the organization and the business, with the vital task of pumping news, information and life into our products on all platforms. First and foremost, reporters must establish themselves as the go-to source of news, data and perspective in their assigned area of coverage. The top mission: to own audience, by every measure.

Weekly newspapers seeking reporter/editors Monona and Sigourney, Iowa Mid-America Publishing Corporation is seeking full-time reporters/news editors for two of its weekly newspaper publications.

Danvers, Massachusetts HCPro’s intelligent, interesting, and dedicated team of editors are expected to generate amazing article ideas, charm busy healthcare professionals into sharing their tips and best practices, keep tabs on regulations important to readers, and work with their editorial, marketing, sales, and customer service colleagues to create and support innovative tools that help industry professionals comply with challenging regulations.

ORGANIZATIONAL LINKS & NETWORKING

Under the Surface of Measles Witch Hunt

331px-Fluzone_vaccine_extractingA Global Research article that expresses some fundamental realities that have created the current anti vaxx hysteria, and pointing to SOP nebulous Big Pharma practices: The blitz has all the markings of an orchestrated campaign, perhaps a good example of “crisis capitalism” revealed to us in Naomi Klein’s seminal work, “The Shock Doctrine”. Whomever the hidden persuaders are, we know who will benefit from the freak-out. They are the Big Pharma megacorporations, their shareholders and others who are trying to shine up the honor of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Practice, and other medical trade organizations, all of which are highly dependent on Big Pharma’s largesse (in the form of advertising revenues and financial support for their medical conventions).”

Coal Mining Endemic Abuses

A Daily Beast article that puts the death of coal miners in a larger and tragic historical perspective: “The loss of life in the Montcoal explosion was the coal industry’s worst since 1970, but in a long view it fit a pattern going back more than a century. The indictment of Blankenship and two of his subordinates is rare in the history of American coal mining, and if convictions follow, it may signal a welcome break in the bloody history of corporate irresponsibility that has characterized West Virginia’s coal industry.”

380px-The_ScreamUnderstanding Demonized Emotions

A refreshing Aeon article that seeks to put a human face on one of the most common and reviled emotions, in a world that too quickly want to pathologize and medicate all uncomfortable emotions away: “This picture of anxiety as a dark and pernicious force certainly has illustrious supporters. Even so, I believe that it is mistaken. It goes against the grain to say this, but anxiety can be a good thing. Indeed, I hope to persuade you that it is central to our ability to successfully navigate moral and social life. I won’t go as far as to say that we need more of it, but we should cultivate it. Worry is important; we should get it right.”

WRITERS' ISSUES & EVENTS & TOOLS

New Productivity Tool

 

Trello from LifeHacker
Trello from LifeHacker

A Life Hacker post that introduces readers to a neat online productivity tool that improves upon other list-making information sharing protocols out there: “Trello works for me because I tend to think very visually, and images and colored labels register with my brain better than plain text. While I’m a big fan of Evernote for managing tons of information, in the past I found myself turning back to individual lists scrawled on paper and even index cards spread out everywhere to get that top-level overview of my days. Trello was a big upgrade; it’s one of those few apps that actually balances both a simple, elegant user interface and powerful, flexible features.”

GENERAL MEDIA & 'INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY' ISSUES

Paywall Blunders and Opportunities

A Digiday article that discusses the various ways that publishers and journalists seek to create revenue so as to be able to maintain the fantasy of profitability in an age where content is easy to come by and advertising revenues don’t cut it:  ““Publishers were reluctant to put enough content behind the paywall. Most adopted a freemium model, but while you might reach a 20-article limit on the New York Times, you’re less likely to on most other sites,” said Piano Media head of communications David Brauchli.

True, but the paywall model also faced a fatal flaw that most publishers are loath to admit: Their content is not differentiated enough to get people to cough up money online.”

RECENT HAPPENINGS

 

"Church of the Saviour on the Blood at Night, St. Petersburg, Russia" by neil_barman - Flickr.com
“Church of the Saviour on the Blood at Night, St. Petersburg, Russia” by neil_barman – Flickr.com

More Absurd Anti Russia Propaganda

A Consortium News article that exposes the fabrications of mainstream media obfuscating the reality of things in Russia that could escalate an all-out war: “Is the New York Times really suggesting that Putin pulled the strings on the likes of Merkel and Nuland, secretly organized neo-Nazi brigades, and ruthlessly deployed these thugs to Kiev to provoke violence and overthrow Yanukovych, all while pretending to try to save Yanukovych’s government – all so Putin could advance some dastardly plot to conquer Europe?

The Times often makes fun of “conspiracy theorists,” but the Times’ narrative is something that would make even the most dedicated “conspiracy theorist” blush. Yet, the Times not only asserts this crazy conspiracy theory but calls it “incontrovertible.””

GENERAL PAST & PRESENT ISSUES & DEVELOPMENTS

America Infrastructure Woes

Boston City FlowA City Lab piece, including charts, that discusses the woeful condition of existing infrastructure, and  points to potential reasons and solutions to this impasse: “It’s long been time to focus more on maintaining America’s existing roads and less on building new ones. The National Highway System already connects virtually all of the areas worth connecting. Driving peaked circa 2004—and even earlier in some states. Traffic remains bad in many metros, but by itself expanding road networks can only temporarily alleviate the problem, and over time might even increase it.

And yet we build. We build without seeming to appreciate that every mile of fresh new road will one day become a mile of crumbling old road that needs additional attention. We build even though our pot of road funding requires increasingly creative (and arguably illegal) solutions to stay anything other than empty.”