12.06.2016 Day in History

CC BY-ND by pieliny
CC BY-ND by pieliny

Across the broad swath of Canada citizens take note that this date is a National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, and Southeast across the Atlantic in Spain, today is Constitution Day; at the fringes of what we would call Eastern Europe seven hundred seventy-six years ago, Mongol fighters under the leadership of Batu Khan successfully initiated a partial conquest of the territories of Rus, including storming the city of Kiev in Little Russia, or what we now call Ukraine; just six years short of three centuries onward from there, and then, in 1534, Spanish colonial adventurers on the West coast of South America established the long-lived city of Quito, Ecuador; seventeen decades past that conjunction, in 1704, a vastly outnumbered Sikh force managed to defeat for a time the attacks of the mMughal armies at the Battle of Chamkaur; exactly sixty-four years later, eight thousand miles to the West in England in 1768, publishers produced the first edition ever of the Britannica Encyclopedia that continues to be a name brand in knowledge; twenty-two additional years in the direction of today, in 1790, the young United States transferred its capital from Manhattan to Philadelphia; three quarters of a century henceforth, in 1865, the United States at least on paper took an important step toward fulfilling its promise of liberty and justice for all with the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the US Constitution, prohibiting slavery, one thousand four hundred sixty-one days after that, in 1869, also in the District of Columbia, African American delegates met in joint session to create the Colored National Labor Union, a Jim Crow expression of the need for working class trade unions; eight years thereafter, in 1877, again in Washington, the first edition of the now-CIA infused Washington Post hit the newsstand; a half decade even closer to the current context, in 1882, the beloved and prolific storyteller and thinker Anthony Trollope turned his final page; four years subsequent to that moment in time, in 1886, to the South in North Carolina, the little baby boy opened his eyes who would rise as the poet of nature and bucolic life cut down by World War One, Joyce Kilmer;westminster london eleven years after on the nose, in 1897, England’s capital became the first metropolitan area to require taxicabs to use special licenses; the very next year, in 1898, a pair of baby boys opened their eyes who would rise to become estimable wordsmiths, the first in Germany and then the United States as Alfred Eisenstaedt, also a renowned photographer, and the second in Sweden as Gunnar Myrdal, also a world-famous social theorist; half a dozen years further along, in 1904, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt promulgated his Monroe Doctrine ‘Corollary,’ further embedding imperial imprimatur into the operations of governance in the ‘land of the free and the home of the brave;’ a thousand ninety-five days beyond that opportunistic interlude, in 1907, colliers in West Virginia confronted the logical outcome of such elevation of bourgeois needs and objectives when an explosion at a Monongah mine killed over three hundred fifty of them in one fell swoop; a decade even closer to the current context, in 1917, Finland’s elites availed themselves of mayhem across the border to declare their ‘independence’ from Russia, while back in the Americas, another gigantic eruption of capital’s relentless drive for profit took place in Halifax Nova Scotia, when munitions in support of the war effort exploded and killed close to two thousand workers and bystanders;another year along time’s temporal arc, in 1919, the male infant entered our midst who would start out his intellectual life as a Belgian collaborator with Nazis but end up a respected, even venerated, literary theorist whose past was unknown to his admirers and followers; two years farther down the pike, in 1921, English and Irish negotiators concluded the Anglo-Irish Treaty and avoided all-out civil war in the British Isles; a mere year nearer to the here and now, in 1922, the Irish Free State became an acknowledged nation; six years onward from that place and time, some six thousand miles Southwest in 1928, Colombian soldiers did the bidding of their United Fruit Company overlords and ended a long walkout by murdering some untabulated scores, or even hundreds, of striking workers;a half decade more toward today, in 1933, a Federal Judge in the U.S. swamp-bayou tree southcame to the only rational conclusion possible in deciding that James Joyce’s protean novel, Ulysses, was not obscene; fourteen additional years on time’s winding path, in 1947, officials in Florida dedicated what would soon become the ever-popular Everglades National Park; just seven hundred thirty-one days subsequently, in 1949, the beloved musical and lyrical pioneer, who went by his nickname, Lead Belly, sang a swansong before exiting; another two cycles round the solar center, Harold Ross died, who had founded and for decades published The New Yorker; a year past that exit, in 1952, an auspicious entrance transpired in which the baby boy called out who would become the Internet entrepreneur and trendsetter, Craig Newmark; the very next year, in 1953, Vladimir Nabokov put the finishing touches on the novel Lolita, which would in many ways define his career as controversial and edgy to the point of transgression; eight more years en route to now, in 1961, a stalwart fighter against colonialism and imperial depredation, Franz Fanon, drew his final breath; four years yet later on, in 1965, the union leader, anarchist, feminist, and seamstress Rose Pesotta made her final exit; six years hence and half a world away in 1971, Pakistan’s severing of diplomatic ties with India marked the beginning of the Indo-Pakistani War of that year; two years still more proximate to the present pass, in 1973, the Twenty-Fifth Amendment came into play as the House of Representatives confirmed Gerald Ford as Richardguitar music art performance Nixon’s Vice President, to replace the discredited and recently resigned Spiro Agnew; fifteen years more along time’s path toward today, in 1988, the Golden-voiced performer and prolific lyricist Roy Orbison lived out his final scene; the next year after that exactly, to the North in Quebec in 1989, a frustrated and crazed gunman murdered fourteen women and then killed himself in Montreal, at the Ecole Polytechnique, claiming that he was acting against feminism in so doing; three years still later, in 1992, a different sort of social division caused the destruction of a nearly four century old mosque in Northeastern India, where Hindu ‘activists’ rose up to raze the building irretrievably; half a dozen years afterward, roughly halfway round the globe in Venezuela in 1998, Hugo Chavez emerged victorious with well over fifty-five percent of the popular vote in Venezuela’s Presidential contest; four years more on time’s traipse toward today’s light and air, in 2002, the redoubtable and beloved activist and proponent of peace and social justice, Philip Berrigan, lived through his final day; four years in even greater proximity to our present day, in 2006, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration released photos that suggested the presence of liquid water on the surface of Mars.