11.17.2016 Day in History

student SAT educationToday is International Student Day; six centuries and eleven years ago, in the islands of Malay habitation, the first Caliphate there came into being, called Sulu; five hundred twenty-four years before the here and now, iconic Persian poet Jami died; a mere two years hence, in 1494, the Italian philosopher and author Giovanni Pico della Mirandolla met his maker; just short of eighteen years later, in 1511, England and Spain formed an alliance against France in an important phase of the Italianate wars; Queen Elizabeth came to power four hundred fifty-eight years ahead of today; the Continental Congress transmitted the Articles of Confederation to the thirteen United States in the midst of war with England two centuries and, again, just shy of twenty years thereafter, in 1777; the first labor organization in the U.S., eight years further down the pike, in 1785, the General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen, took shape in New York City; anot her five years yet later on, in 1790, the male infant entered our midst who would mature as the mathematical and philosophical genius, August Ferdinand Möbius; in an urban sector formed from swampland ten years hence, in 1800, Congress first met in the District of Columbia; Chile’s founding junta assumed command of the country eleven years past that conjunction, in 1811, five thousand miles to the South in the Western Hemisphere; two decades subsequently, in 1831, both Ecuador and Venezuela separated from Gran Columbia; eight years subsequent to that juncture, in 1839, the great Verdi’s first opera, Oberto, opened at

CC BY-NC-ND by Boris & Co

Teatro alla Scala in Milan; seventeen years beyond that moment in time, in 1856, four years prior to the Civil War, the United States established Fort Buchanan in Southern Arizona to provide the basis for civil authority in the territory of the Gadsden purchase from Mexico; two years past that instant, in 1858, six thousand miles away in England, the Welsh socialist thinker and social reformer, Robert Owen, breathed his last; the Suez Canal linked the Mediterranean with the Indian Ocean for the first time eleven years and twelve hundred miles South, in 1869, in the Sinai region; two years subsequently and back in North America, in 1871, the

CC BY-SA by joelogon
CC BY-SA by joelogon

National Rifle Association obtained a corporate charter in New York State; the baby boy entered the world a hundred twenty years back who would become psychologist and philosopher Lev Vygotsky; half a decade afterward, in 1901, in ‘Little Russia,’ the Ukrainian-American baby who grew up to become dramatic theorist and teacher Lee Strasberg was born; seven hundred thirty days more along the temporal arc, in 1903, the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party split into two factions the ‘majority’ or Bolshevik section and the ‘minority’ or Menshevik group; four years closer to today, in 1907, the infant who would grow up to fill the role of Aleister Crowley’s secretary as the iconic occultist and author Israel Regardie was born; nine more years nearer to now, in 1916, the child who turned out to write history as Shelby Foote was born; eighty-four years prior to the present pass, the groundbreaking storyteller and author, Charles W. Chesnutt, came to his final chapter; the United States concluded the process of formal recognition of the Soviet Union another year onward, in 1933, which was sixteen years after the revolutionary government’s first iteration; five years subsequent to that point, in 1938, the infant male who matured into singer-songwriter Gordon Lightfoot came into the world; one year later, in 1939, Nazis executed eleven Czech students for their role in leading anti-Nazi demonstrations, with over a thousand deportations of students to concentration camps to follow, all of which established the basis for International Students Day today, and the English journalist Auberon Waugh was born; three years past that juncture, in 1942, the baby boy who grew to become director and screenwriter Martin Scorcese uttered his first cry, and Ben Reitman, the iconic anarchist, organizer, and battler for workers, as well as the scribe responsible for Boxcar Bertha, lived out his final day; the Screen Actor’s Guild added an anti-Communist clause to its loyalty oath another half decade along time’s path, in 1947, and a pair of Bell Laboratory researchers recognized the basis for transistors in the surface electrical qualities of Silicon, while in Philadelphia, the infant first cried out whose destiny it was to become the famed director and screenwriter Steven E. de Souza, and the Russian—Ukrainian-Polish, actually—novelist, historian, and activist Victor Serge died in Mexico; sixty-six years ago, the United Nation Security Council adopted its Resolution 89 which sought to implement armistice agreements in the Middle East; sixteen years later, in 1966, the baby boy meant to become God and Monsters’ frontman and songwriter Jeff Buckley came into the world; in a televised address helicopter war vietnamto the nation, President Lyndon Johnson announced, one year yet later on, in 1967, that U.S. forces were “making progress” in Vietnam; a mere year afterward, in 1968, a hilarious d’enoument to a much-anticipated Raiders-Jets football game, in which the exciting finish was paved over by a previously scheduled NBC broadcast of Heidi, prompted changes to sports broadcasting in the U.S.; one year henceforth, in 1969, negotiators of the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics first gathered in Helsinki for an initial round of Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty talks, attempting to limit the number of nuclear weapons in the countries’ respective arsenals, which by the bye continue to threaten human extinction today; a year after that, in 1970, the trial of Lieutenant William Calley for the My Lai massacre in Vietnam began, and the Soviet Union Luna Program landed the first remote controlled device to rove the surface of the moon; three years from this point, in 1973, Nixon’s famed “I am not a

Richard M. Nixon campaign 1968
Richard M. Nixon campaign 1968

crook” made history on this day, and the Athens Polytechnic uprising against the military regime ended in a bloodshed in the country’s capital; nine years beyond that point, in 1982, ‘Boom Boom’ Mancini killed Duk Koo Kim during a 14-round match in Las Vegas, a fatality which prompted reforms in the sport of boxing; three hundred sixty-five days more proximate to today’s light and air, in the Winter of 1983-84, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation first initiated operations in Mexico; another half dozen years further along, in 1989, Czech students began the protests that led to the end of Soviet dominance in Czechoslovakia; a thousand ninety-six days hence, in 1992, the acclaimed poet and critic and activist for civil rights and human rights, Audre Lorde, played out her final scene; the operation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, authorized two years earlier, first received Congressional imprimatur one year even closer to now, in 1993, and in Nigeria, General Sani Abacha ousted the government of Ernest Shonekan in a military coup; four years after that, in 1997, a tragedy befell over 60 people in Luxor, Egypt, at the hands of six Islamic militants outside the Temple of Hatshepsut; Peru’s President Alberto Fujimori faced ouster from his three years thereafter, in 2000; in London another thirteen years onward, in 2013, Nobel Literary Laureate Doris Lessing breathed her last.