10.20.2016 Day in History

© Nevit Dilmen
© Nevit Dilmen

Today is World Statistics Day as well as another interlude to commemorate a disease, World Osteoporosis Day; in the so-called New World four hundred sixty-eight years back, two European monarchs permitted Alonso Mendoza to act as their representative in founding the city of La Paz as an exemplar of Our Lady of Peace; two hundred sixty-eight years ago, Caribbean pirate Calico Jack was finally captured by the Royal Navy; two hundred thirty-five years before the here and now,  the Hapsburg Monarchy approved a rudimentary recognition of religious freedom with its Patent of Toleration; twenty-two years later, in 1803, the Senate ratified the Louisiana purchase, a key imperial move in U.S. continental expansion; the forty-ninth parallel became the Northwestern border between Canada and the United States a decade and a half years thereafter, according to the Convention of 1818; at the battle of Navarino nine years subsequently, 1827, Russian, French, and British navies defeated a combined Turkish/Egyptian force off the coast of Greece; one hundred fifty-eight years prior to the present pass, the baby boy entered the world who became acclaimed poet Rimbaud; five years hence, in 1859, the child who matured as philosopher and educator John Dewey books library history researchwas born; a hundred forty-three years ago,  three Ivy League schools and Rutgers created the first set of rules for American Football; ten years afterward, in 1883, Peru and Chile signed the Treaty of Ancon which brought Peru’s involvement in the Pacific War to an end and recarved the South American map; ninety-six years closer to today, in 1920, a baby girl first cried out on her way to becoming celebrated linguist and academic Fanny de Sivers; a half decade subsequently, in 1925, the baby male who would write wittily and scandalously as commentator Art Buchwald was born; Socialist leader of principle and passion Eugene Debs died exactly a year after that, in 1926, in part because of his imprisonment for the ‘crime’ of calling war butchery in favor of the rich; a year subsequent to that conjunction, in 1927, the infant female came into the world who grew up to become the sexual psychologist Dr. Joyce Brothers; a year further down the pike, in 1928,  Dorothy Parker, under her pen name Constant Reader, reviews A.A. Milne’s The House at Pooh Corner in The New Yorker, acknowledging that “to speak against Mr. Milne puts one immediately in the ranks of those who set fire to orphanages; the Long March of Mao Tse Tung and his comrades ended seven years afterward, in 1935, permitting the regrouping that laid the basis for Communist victory a decade and a half later; three hundred sixty-six days still farther along the temporal path, in 1936, a baby boy first shouted out en route to his rise as Black leader and founder of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, Bobby Seale; another three years further along, in 1939, Pope Pius XII issued an encyclical that denounced cultural chauvinism and totalitarian politics generally, in spite of his soon-to-occur agreement with the U.S. to provide safe harbor for Nazi escapees of Germany’s defeat; five years closer to now, in 1944, liquid natural gas leaked in Cleveland and exploded, killing a hundred thirty people, Douglas MacArthur did ‘return’ to the Philippines, and Soviet armies liberated Belgrade from the Nazis, and in the Balkans, the Soviet Army and Yugoslav

By ProtoplasmaKid cc 4.0
By ProtoplasmaKid cc 4.0

Partisans liberated Belgrade; two years down the road to the day, in 1946, the Austrian baby girl who grew up as Elfriede Jelinek and won the Nobel Prize in Literature was born; the House Unamerican Activities Committee yet another year closer to the current context, in 1947, began its investigations of Communist activities among creative sorts in Hollywood, and the U.S.-Pakistani alliance started to take shape; three years beyond that moment of paranoia and depredation, in 1950, a baby boy was born who would rock and write as the iconic Tom Petty; another year later still, in 1951, on a football field in Oklahoma, a White player blatantly assaulted a Black player and broke his jaw, without punishment; a year more proximate to today, in 1952, not quite half a world away in Kenya, British authorities declared a state of emergency over the so-called Mau-Mau uprising against colonial depredation, in the police response to which a former Kenya Prime Minister ends up behind bars; four years henceforth, in 1956, a male child entered our midst who would mature as the writer and filmmaker Danny Boyle; exactly five years hence, in 1961, the Soviets conducted their first armed test of an intercontinental ballistic missile from a submarine launching platform; just a year more proximate to the present moment, in 1962, Chinese Communist forces invaded Northern India and began the Sino-Indian war; seven hundred thirty-one days after that point, in 1964, former President and ‘champion’ of so-called conservatism, Herbert Hoover, lived out his final day; two years hence, in 1966, the baby boy first opened his eyes on his way to becoming Stefan Raab, the German comedian, writer, and talented performer; precisely four years beyond that juncture, in 1970, six

Cape Town South Africa
Cape Town South Africa

thousand miles Westward in the Horn of Africa, Somalia’s leaders declared it a socialist republic; another year onward, in 1971, a baby boy entered the world in standard fashion who would become the rapper and producer and cultural savant, Snoop Dogg; Richard Nixon initiated the so-called “Saturday Night Massacre” three years past that instant in time, in 1973, firing several officials in search of a Justice Department leader who would fire Watergate Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox; four more years along the temporal arc, in 1977, the plane that was transporting the rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd, crashed landed after running out of gas, killing half the band’s members; three years later exactly, in 1980, Ronald Reagan wrote to the head of the Air Traffic Controllers’ Union to seek an endorsement in his race for President, promising support for the union’s demand for better technology and work conditions, a vow that he broke with impunity nine months after the group backed Reagan for President; following another passage of the Earth around the sun, in 1981, two policemen and an armed guard of a shipment of money died in a robbery in suburban New York City conducted by the Weather Underground and the Black Liberation Army; after another two year hiatus, in 1983, acclaimed bard and crooner of working class lament and triumph, Merle Travis, sang his swan song; a year further forward toward today, in 1984, important and path-finding mathematician, physicist, and philosopher Paul Dirac died; two decades afterwards, in 2004, Anthony Hecht, the celebrated poet and educator, breathed his last; six year after that literary death, in 2010, the world lost the publisher of another ‘literary’ enterprise, the man who as Bob Guccione, founded Penthouse Magazine, a single year ahead of this moment in time, 2011 Libyan rebels whom the United States had supplied, supported, and funded captured and prepared to execute Muammar Gaddafi; a year past that, in 2012, the environmental activist who co-founded Earth Day breathed his last.